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Full text of "Antioch News 05/15/1986"

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, ANTJp.GHvTOWNSHIP- LIBRARY 
757 Nr MAIN 1ST.. . 
ANTiQCH, ILL C0O§2 



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Newspapers 



VOL. 100— NO. 20 



ANTIOCH, iLllNOISi THURSDAY, MAY15, 









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R SECTIONS— 76 PAGES 



35' PER COPY 



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by CHARLES JOHNSTON 

Former Antioch mayoral candidate, 
Philip Burke, was found guilty of six counts 
of deceptive^ practices in the Lake, County. 
Circuit Court on May 7., 

Burke had been accused of writing six 
checks, five to the PlgglyWiggly Food Store 
in Antioch amounting to a total of $210 and 
one to Triple A Auto Parts in the amount of 
$119.34. without funds in his account. The 
checks were writteninearly March of 1985. - 

According to Asst. States Ally. Dave' 
Deltose. the Piggly Wiggly : store; tried to 
contact Burke numerous times without 






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success. When the Triple A Auto Parts Store 
contacted him, Burke told the owner that he 
would just have "to do what you have to do," 
DeRosesaid. 

Lt. Tom Fisher of the Antioch Police Dept. , 
talked to Burke several times and said that 
Burke finally just swore at him. 

In midrApril of 1985, Burke disappeared 
from town and; made.no attempt to make 
good on the bad checks. The Antioch Police 
Dept, put out a warrant for his arrest. 

"According to Fisher, the Antioch Police 
had information that Burke was living with a 
girl in Chicago. A tip that came in late 
December resulted in Antioch calling the 
Chicago Police Dept. with an address where 
they, believed Burke could be found. On Jan. 
1, 1986, the Chicago Police arrested Burke. 

After the arrest, Burke's girlfriend mailed 
money to the stores in an attempt to clear the 
matter up. The states, attorney's office 
decided to continue prosecution. 

The trial ran for three days in the cour- 
troom of Judge John Hughes. On May 7, the 
jury retired, considered the case for a half an 
hour; and returned with a verdict of guilty on 
all six charges. Burke will be sentenced on 
June 4. He could receive as much as one to 
three years in the penitentiary or as little as 
'probation. 

In 1981, Burke ran for mayor of Antioch. 
During that campaign, he promised to 
"bring the village back under the control of 
its citizens." He said that he_ would broaden 
the tax base through new land annexations. 
The voters were unimpressed, giving him 
only eight votes out of a total of 1536 cast. 



Gwinn Heads 



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Index 



James Gwinn, of Antioch, has been named 
vice-president of the Public Ministries 
Branch of Chicago^ Moody Bible Institute 
(MBI). Gwinn has been with MBI for 13 
years, working in the area of public relations 
and church conferences. 

In his new position, Gwinn will oversee the 
work of the Moody-Keswick Bible Con- 
ference Center, the MBI Alumni Assn., 
the Sonlife Youth Ministries and the Moody 
Broadcasting Network, in addition to public 
relations and church conferences. 





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Sport* .,.......■•».■• .Tkl*J,3ip, 

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Help Kids 

The Antioch Jaycees will hold the seventh 
: annual '.'Bowling for Autistic Children" at 
Antioch; Bowl oh Sunday, May 18; from 10 
a.m. tol'6 p.m. Bowlers will collect pledges 
for each pin they knock down in a three-game 
series. The money will be used to help 
autistic children. 

Anyone may participateand prizes will be 
given to the top two collectors in the adult 
and children's categories. The top bowler in 
each category will also receive a prize. 

For further information, call Debbie 
O'Connor at (312) 395-0152 or Kathleen 
Branyik at (312) 395-3111. 






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Prom Court 

Students at Antioch Community High School enjoyed their annual prom on May 9 at 
the Chicago Marriott O'Hare. The prom court included, back row, from left: Scott 
Koeller; Todd Gedville; Sean Tuley; George Allen, King; and Bob Carney. Front 
row, from left: Sue Behling; Crissy Brown; Linda Sexton, Queen; Alicia Moats; and 
Mary Bodin. 

Health Dept. To 




During the week of May 19-23. Lake Countv 
. Health Dept. animal wardens will be can- 
vassing door-to-door in the Lotus Woods area 
of Antioch Twp. to check for rabies vac- 
cination and Lake County Registration Tags 
on dogs and cats. 

During canvassing, violators will be issued 
tickets at $15 per violation. Violations in- 
clude: no current rabies vaccination; no 
Lake County rabies registration tags; and an' 
animal running at large, off. the owner's 
property. 

The Lake County.Rabies Control ordinance 
requires that all dogs and cats have attached 
to their collar a Lake County rabies tag as 
proof of their vaccination status. The tags 
are available -from the health department 



auu cct'iditi muiuciiKuuitb upon prcWntalioh 
of the vaccination certificate (obtained from 
the veterinarian) with the required fee. Pets 
must be registered within 21 days of vac- 
cination. 

The purpose of the tags is to provide proof 
of vaccination if the animal bites or if the 
animal is bitten by a rabid animal. Tags are 
also useful in tracing ownership if the pet is 
lost. A file of all registered dogs and cats is 
kept by the health department, cross 
referenced by the animal owner's last name 
and Lake County Tag number, to. assist 

' residents in need of such information. 
For additional information on rabies 

registration tags and rabies, call. the Lake 

County Health Dept. rabies control program 

at (312) 360-6424 or (312) 526-5336. 



ACHS, GCHS Students 
Receive Scholarships 



The Lake Villa Community Consolidated 
Scholarship Fund Dist. 41 is announcing that 
area students have been selected to receive 
the 1986 scholarship awards. 

Jean Kim, Lindenhurst resident and An- 
tioch High School student, has been chosen to 
receive a four-year scholarship of $500 for 
each of the four years. 

Another Lindenhurst resident, Jennifer 
Smith has been named to receive a one time 
$500 scholarship. She is a'senior at Grayslake 
High School. 

Denis Maple of Lake Villa, has been named 
to receive the Gina Allen Memorial Scholar- 
ship. She will receive $500 to continue her 
education. Maple attends Antioch High 
School. 

Elizabeth Trychta, Antioch High School 
senior and Lake Villa resident, will be 
receiving a one time scholarship of $500. 

Stacey Anderson from Antioch High School 
will be receiving a one time vocational 
scholarship of $500. This scholarship is the 
First American Bank of Lake County 
Scholarship. 

These students were selected as recipients 
based on their academic records for the past 
four years, various test scores and their ] 
class rank. The scholarships are to be used to 
help defray the costs of the students' con- 
tinuing education. 

The scholarship committee was especially 
pleased this year to be able to award both a 
four-year scholarship and a ; vocational 
scholarship. 

This was due to the tremendous response 
the community gave to the fund, raising ef- 
forts as well as donations from the area 
businesses. 



First American Bank of Lake County has 
received the special distinction of having a 
scholarship named in their honor for their 
ongoing support of the scholarship fund. 

The scholarship fund has grown rapidly 
since its inception three years ago. With con- 
tinued growth the scholarship fund will be 
able to award a greater number of scholar- 
ships in the future. 

. Contributions to the scholarship fund may 
be made by sending donations to The Dist. 
41 Scholarship Fund, Administrative Of- 
fice, 304 E. Grand Ave. Lake Villa, 111. 60046. 

These students will be receiving their 
awards at their individual high school 
ceremonies. Antioch High School will have 
its on May 22, at 2:30 p.m. and Grayslake 
students will have theirs on May 28, at 7:30 
p.m. 



Orientation 
Set For 19th 

'On Monday, May 19, at 7:30 p.m., the An- 
tioch; Upper Grade School will host a fifth- 
grade orientation. This program is designed 
for fifth graders who will enter the school as 
sixth graders in the fall. 

The .program will include a short in- 
troductory talk, a slide presentation, and a 
question and answer session! Parents who 
wish to tour the building may arrive at 7 p.m. 
Staff and student monitors will be available 
to answer questions about facilities and 
programs. ^ 

Refreshments' will be served in the 
cafeteria after the program. 



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CHEVROLET 

ROUTE 41 & PARK AVENUE • HIGHLAND PARK 

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Saturday 9 AM-6 PM 



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SUBARU 



ROUTE 41 & PARK AVENUE • HIGHLANO PARK 
432-4000 

HOURS: Monday thru Friday 9 AM-9 PM, 
Saturday 9 AM-6 PM 



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Thunday May 15,4966 



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Athlete Of The Week 

Baseball player/ Rich Risch, has been selected 'Athlete; of -'the 'Week' at Antioch 
High School for the week ending May 4: During three games, Risch pitched a six-hit 
shut-out against Lake, Forest, and weht.fqur for five white batting in- four runs 
against Grant and Stevenson. Doug Raupp of .the First National Bank of Antioch 
presented a $50 check to the Parent-teacher Scholarship Fund in Risch' name. 
Baseball coach Rich Brown presented a plaque to Risch in honor of his 
achievement. 

Holtz Tells How 
To Cut Tax Bl 




(312) 223-8161. 



Chirles Johnston, 



Folwf, (312) 223-8161 



Pit 



(312) 39M700. 



Jean Rrbicki, 



Grass Lake, Ar- 
deen Harris (312) 395-2761. 



ft mi ti 1IM, Combining the 

Antioch News and Antioch 
Reporter. 1985. 

Published every Thursday, second 
class postage paid at Antioch, IL 
60002. 

•ffitt tf NMm H — ! 952 Main 

Street. Antioch, IL 60002. Phone : 
(312)395-8700. 




HctDg-toorter 




Newspapers 

(USPS 027-080) 



SKY 




Winners of many 

State and Local 

Newspaper Awards 




. .J lilw: $11.50 
Per Year by Mail paid in advance 
in Lake, Cook, Kenosha and 
McHenry Counties; elsewhere' 
117.00 Per Year by Mail paid in 
advance. : 

tetsMtaf: Send address 
changes to Lakeland Newspapers, 
30 South Whitney Street, P.O. Box 
268, Grayslake, Illinois 60030. 

Mf •rliiitg ItatfliKf 

Regular edition, Retail Display advertising must be in the office of publication no later than Mon- 
day at 5:00 p.m. Classified Display advertising must be in the office of publication by Tuesday at 
11:00 a.m. Word Rate Classified will be accepted until 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday. 

Hm ItafliM 

Society News 5:00 p.m. Friday, Club Meeting News 5:00 p.m. Friday, Sports News Noon Monday, 
Obituary. 8:00 a.m. Tuesday, Business News 5:00 p.m. Friday. 



by CHARLES JOHNSTON 

Real estate tax bills have been sent out 
and, according to Antioch T\vp- Assessor, 
R.G. "Bud" Holtz, residents of the Antioch 
area can expect to sec an increase over last 
year's bill. *.' -. 

Tax rates went up overall by about 64 cents 
per $100 of assessed valuation with the big 
increases coming from Lake County, Antioch 
Community High School, and the Antioch 
Twp. Library District. 

For a home with a market value of $70,000, 
the total increase works out to about $150 
more than last year. 

Holtz has served as the assessor of Antioch 
Township since January of 1974. He is a 
Certified Illinois Assessing Official (CIAO) 
and has continued his education on the 
subject since taking office 12 years ago. 

One of the things that irritates Holtz is that 
homeowners frequently do not take ad- 
vantage of all the exemptions that are 
available to them. "People could save 
themselves some money if they took ad- 
vantage of all the exemptions that the law 
provides for," Holtz said. 

As an example, he cited 'the homestead 
exemption, which is available to anyone who 



is living in their own home. "All people have 
to do is apply for this exemption at the 
assessor's office and they get $3,500 exemp- 
ted from their assessed valuation. Senior 
citizens who apply every year can get an 
additional $2,000 exempted " Holtz said. 

Homeowners who, make improvements to 
their home can get a four-year homestead 
improvement exemption for the entire 
assessed value of the improvement, up to a 
maximum of $30,000. 

Holtz is particularly busy right now as this 
is "the year for* Antioch Township's 
quadrennial reassessment. All properly in 
the township must be reassessed this year. 

To help carry out the duties of his office, 
Holtz has a, part-time man in the field and 
two women in the office. One of the women is 
a CIAO and the other is in training for her 
certification. "I'm a great believer in 
education," Holtz said; "the more you know 
about your work, the better you can do your 
job." 

For those who had the misguided notion 
that the assessor's job is to squeeze as much 
out of the homeowner in taxes as possible, 
see Bud Holtz. He will happily tell you how to 
pay less. 




ACHS Plans Spring Recital 



On Thursday, May 15, at 7:30 p.m. the 
Antioch High School Arts Dept. will present 
its annual spring concert in the auditorium. 

The school year of 1985 and '86 has been an 
exceedingly busy year for the choirs. The a- 
cappella choir has presented four major 
concerts, and participated in two festivals, 
one of the festivals hosted to 10 converence 
schools. The freshman girls chorus, and the 
concert choir have taken part in two con- 
certs. 



The evening performance will feature a 
piano duo, Christine Exner and Philip Fabry 
playing Sonatina in C Major Opus 36 No. 3, a 

mixed ensemble, freshman chorus, concert 
choir and the a-cappella choir, and the 

Madrigal singers. The a-cappella will per- 
form a medley, of songs from the hit musical 

"Cats," "Amazing Grace" an American folk 
song, and many other songs that are 
designed to please the listener. 



Taking A Bite Out Of Crime 

The Rotary Club of Antioch presented Crimestoppers Executive Director, Mike 
Holliday (left), with a check for $500. Presenting the check were, Paul Pavelskl 
(center), Rotary President, and Antioch Rotarian Bud Scichowski, who is also a 
member of the' Crimestoppers board of directors. Before presenting the check, 
Payelski said, The money we are presenting today is just one small investment in 
a program that has a significant impact on the lives of all of us in Antioch and Lake 
County.' 

Announce Sen/or Services Schedule 



Chain Of Lakes Senior 
Services provides tran- 
sportation for senior citizens 
to the doctor, dentist, etc. by 
appointment. Call (312) 395- 
5161 between 9 a.m. and 3 
p.m. 

The following is the 



planned transportation 
schedule for the last half of 
May: 

Monday, May 12— shop- 
ping at Hawthorn; Thur- 
sday, May 15— shopping in 
Antioch; Friday, May 
16— Regency Mall; Monday, 



May 19— shopping at Round 
Lake Mall; Thursday, May 
22— shopping in Antioch; 
Friday, May 23— garage 
sales; Thursday, May 
29— shopping in Antioch; and 
Friday, May 30— Welton's 
Discount Grocery, Gurnee. 



ACHS' Announces 3rd Quarter Honor Roll 



Antioch Community High - 
School has announced the 
honor roll for the third nine- 
week period. Students who 
achieved top academic 

honors Were: High Honort-Sonlort- 
Kim Allooo, Slocay Andarton, Jotaph ' 
Boblo. Jannllar Bokar,' Cindy Boro, Alan 
Block, David Oat*, Jay Crkhton, Jattlca 
Druklonit, Both Oubak, Chrlttlna Ebar- 
man, Shannon Gooch, Julia Culka, Ranaa 
Hoi I wot. Doran* Harp, Patrick Hannatty, 
Ttrtii Johanaton, . "Joan Kim. Karl 
Krauloch, OanltaMopla, MorioMorovalat, 
Kotrlna Mayor, and Daonrva Muror. 

Alto, Mlchoal Oiltchtooar. Jill Paluccl. 
Draft Parkhurtt, .Dawn Potchok, Paul 
Polawottyk, Barbara Rampola, Mork 
Rognlo. Varalia Rahrt, Lor I Rugojat, Uto 
Rumpt, Carrlaxhatkia, Mallita Schwartz. 
Robin' Sharwood, Holly Taylor. David 
Thief*. Gratchan Tlmmarmon, Todd Mi- 
men, Dorto Ward, Wandy Walli. Robart 
Whltnay, Matlhaw Wltion, and Mlchalla 
Slahl. 

Junlort-Robarl Abbott, Gaorga Allan, 
Jannllar Bonkt. Krltlln Ball, Klmbarly 
Bighorn, Jana Carton., Klmbarly Crank,' 
Jonat Eng, John Fador, Jomat Hornondoi, 1 
Uto Hawick, Slocay Howla. Donna 
Jocktan, Jaflray Johnion, Uto Johnton, 
Pomata Kotprowlct, JaHaroy local, Koran 
linoblonm, Satan' Montrlmat,' 'Kannalh 
Mullon, and Kally Murray, 



' Alto, Sua Naumon, Cindy Olian, Malody 
Rallmoyor, Lynnalta -Ramon, Richard C. 
Ruck, Stavan Scoria, Julia Saltan, Undo 
Saxton, Dabra Slglar, Angola Slmont, 
Dion* Smith, Cindy Spronk, Jannllar 
Stoork, Colhl Slalnka. Andraw Trlagar, 
Saon Tuloy, Jaton Vaughn. Mkhalla Wolk. 
Sharri Wolth, Gragory Wat bo, Jotaph 
Wetlorgoord, and Larry W Miami. 

SophomorotElaanor Allan, Dorothy An- 
darton, Paul Andarton. Trocl Atklnton, 
■rati tannatt, Phillip Brown. Richard Con- 
callara. John Ctko, Krltllna Cormonay, Jill 
Curtit, Eric Datbiant, Tina Dloman- 
topoulot, John Dydo, Jaton Gulka, Oovld 
Hollwot, Brodlay Homlln, Corral - Ham- 
mond, Victoria Jack ton. Amy Kir- 
•chonhaliar, Stalonla Kuahn, and frad 
Locttar, .■"'*'.. 

Alto, John Urtdgran. Timothy Moo 
Donald, Brut Mahar. Jomai McCtora, 
Thomat MuaKcr,- Sharon Muror, Tom ■ 
Niamlac, David Orwlck. Brandon Parkhur- 
tt, Cyndl Qulnn, Matt S**!on, Joanna 
Shinaliug, Koran Spronk, . Kola Stock; 
Oanial Sttllo, Roban Slurma, Robart 
Sykat, Rico Turco, Diana Vallman, Sandra 
VHIarraol, and Rabacca Waakt. 
', Frathman-Alytio Colby. Pomalo 
Erlckton. Mkhoal Farrora, Jo* Flkojt. 
Down Flood, Amanda Frltlt, Michaal 
Golablowtbl, Scott Gooch, Amy Groattar, 
Soroh Gray, Dan Grota, Daboroh Harkh, 
Rod ooarla, Rabacca Johnt, Garald John. 
ton, Daboroh Koiprowia, Cryttol Kan- 
nady.. Douglot' Kllllan. Joton Koahlar. 



Mlchoal Laltio, and Kalll Lalllth. 

Alto, Jonaihon Madama, Chad Modra, 
William Radmon, Scott Rotmart, Ala«lt 
RogoLa Mlchalla Schmidlka. Corola Sch. 
warti, Jannllar Schworti, Paula Smith, 
Haathar Sorantan, Lorry Sowdar, Thomot 
Stock, Tom Stoork, Jomta Slaworl, Mika 
Ulttch. Mlchalla Vallman, Jotaph Wolth. 
Ryan Word. Mark Womiok, Klmbarly 
Yaoton, ond Gaorga Zuponadt. • 

Honorc-Sanlort-Kotatt* Adklnt, Rabac- 

co Allan, Sondl Allmonn, Scott Andanon, 
Ronald Bakar, Charyl Backar, Carl Bonnatt, . 
Mork Bar. Loult Blllmyor, John Blakanay. 
KannathjBock, Patrick BVunt, Mlchoal Bye- 
>ak, Julia Camay, Krltlan Chrlttantan, 
Moryonn Cropiawtkl, Volar la Dommonn, 
Cindy Oorlond, Mory DaZattar, and Gf •)- 
chan Dvorok. 
' Alto. Brian Eltata, Philip Faery, Slavan 
Fancl, Brondi Forgvion. Suianna Fratch, 
'Laaonn Frydrychowkz, Motihaw Gall, 
Maria - Gotwoln, Eric , Glovor, Mlchoal 
Grublch, Donold Gunthar,. Oarrlck'Gur- 
tchka, Jaf) Gutka. Staphan Horrton, 
Sobrlno Hougk. Owrlat Hawk, Nlchola 
Howorth, Edward Hoyat, John Holmat, 
ond Poolo Howla. 

Alto, Chrlttla Hubbard, Julia Joroch. 
Dorlana Johnion, Mlchallo Koymayar, 
Chrlttlna Korantkl, Garrl loach, Elian Laa, 
Koy Llndtay, Haathar lucodallo, Louro 
Mottton, Loorla'McDavHt, Erin McMohon, 
Dannlt Moora, ' CroJg Muallar. Karry 
Mullen.' JohnNoughron. Ntkhl NMtan. 
Jaonallar Nydan, lourla Paddock, and 



Trie la Panned. 

Alto, Julia Plochy, Chrlttlna Ron, lorry 
Rodgart, Dabra Rutcko. Dabra Schoan, 

Erian Saflorlund, Anlka Sorantan, John 
Sioark, Mika Slonak', Haldi Stubnar, Klm- 
barly Sullivan, Jannllar Tatro, Brian 
Thoran, Rick Turco, Roban Vltaa, Malitta 
Wothburn, Bryan Whlta, John Wlaricham, 
Cindy Wlllati , Shown Wiltto, Kim Zlemann, 
Haldl" . Zimmarmann, and Mlchalla 
Zuponack, 

Junlort-Daborah j Albrachl, Thomot 
Bach, Joal Bochochln, Jonlna Balll, Ilia 
Bond, Holdl Brodlay^ John Corlay, Robari 
Cornay, Kalth Cartwrlght, Jonny Chatla, 
Dava Chiiholm, Mlchalla Cotkay, Cindy 
Dalono, Down Doty, Sally Deucat. Koran 
Druta, Thomat Durall, Paulo Erlckton, 
Diana Emit, and Timothy Gognon. 

Alto, Thomat Gauthlar, Corlnno Gran- 
dtart, Jtnnlfer Cflllin, Graiio Gronnlgar, 
Jomat Harnondaz. John Higglnt. Sutanna 
Huackttoadl, Richard Joblomki, Raymond 
Janlnak, Chrlttlna Johnton, ErtkoJung, - 
April Kruagar. Jomai Kuachla, - Suton 
laparo, Krlilina laurtan, Mlchoal Lowran- 
ce, Mlchala Lanz, Cynthia Lattard, Thomot 
Mocak, ond Amy Malona, 

Alto, Brldgat Moulo.' Julia McBrody. 
Amy McPhaa, Bill Mlrowtki. JaHray Maul, 
Jalfray Nlaltan, Klmbarly Pouly, Dawn 
Priory. Haidl Raulboch; Jock Rutch, 
Thomot Scbron, Patar Slymon, Holly Smith, 
Haldl Sorantan, Rob Stachar, JaHary 
Slaiti. Trocl Vlllo. Dannlt Wolth, Dovid 
Wattafpoord, Tarata Whlllock, Darran 



Wolf, and Jaff ray Wolf. 

Sophomorat-Curtlt Aril, Dona Athloy, 
Brando Balka, Julia Billmyar, Malltto 
Brown, Trocy Buaga, Daonna Camp, 
Daboroh Chrlttantan, Brian Clark. 
Daboroh Cooler, Charyl Cook, Branno 
Dota. Varonlco DaBroccio, Suionna 
Dabruhl. Rich Daultch, David Doty. Dabfala 
Draltka, Shown Eppart, Undo Fattar, and 
Scott Fratch. 

Alto, Krlilina Friar, Kavln Honrahan, 
Trocay Hawklnt, Llta Hannatty, Wandy 
Jantan, Kothlaan Jonat, Andrao ' Kohtar, 
Lorroln* Klrwon, Suton Klamma, . Jill 
Lallaur, John Latch, Kavln Moglnn, 
ootamorla Mortholl, Dlonno McKonly, 
Corfnna Mllchan. Vlckl* Nalton, Paul 
Naurouiar, Dovid Ohalm, Shari Otruilna, 
ondChrltPolark.' 

Alto, Wandy Proctor. Corrla Pullan, 
Julia Raynlok, Robart Rtckan, Jaroma 
Rutcko, Chrlilophar Shap, Saon Sidat, 
Chritll Sklnnar. Philip ' Smart, Bryan 
Striichak. Donald Sokoch, Tammy Wognar, 
Jolton Wlncklar,- Dannlt Wunn, Richard 
Young, Cynlhlo Zlamann, and Mlchoal 
Zolno. 

Frathmen-Reborl Adomt, Chod Allono, 
Kim' Andanon, Victor- Atkaw. Mlchoal 
Boblo. And raw Bar gar , lona Barnard, Bar- 
bara Billmyar, Caul* Block, Scott Bond, 
Darek Bortky, Mallndo Brauar, Janny Bun- 
ting,' Jomat Cowort, John Curtit, Cotharlno 
Cropiawtkl, Mlchalla Dovlt, Ban|omln 
Damortlnl, Stacy Dawor, and. Haothor 
Dingtdoto, 



Alto. Donnatla Dowall, Holly Edwordt, 
Carrla EHingar, Darlaan Fraitag, Thomot 
Fray, Chrit Glabalhaut, Joton Goodman, 
Victoria Grodowtkl, Jannllar Hoguo. Jan- 
i nilar Halay, Andraw Hontan, Cornallo 
' Hougk, Richard Hatrick, Suton Hubbard, 
Janniler Huackilaodt, Morykata Hug hat. 
Wary El I an Humphrayt, Randy Jeam, 
Rochal Jannlngi, and Mika Kollnowtkl. 

Alto. Jomat Kalm, April Kltal, Danlta 
Krojac, Andraw Krartko, Rabacco Kromar, 
Erlka Londl, Altera lavlgna. Rochalla Lin- 
dot, Kolly Mopla, David Moton, Rabacca 
McKinlay, Mlchoal Madama, "Dawn 
Maradllh, Jomat Mooli, Mlchoal Monoco, 
Rochal Moratl, Uto Morlay, Haolhar 
Nation,* Stavan Nawcomb, ond Rott 
Noathllng, 

Alto. Cor mo n Ogia, Co I Ian Otmond, 
'Krttttn Pognl, Trocy Patok, Danlal Plallar, 
Jomat Plarca, Koran Plat, Suton Romlg. 
Bath Roukohl. Amy Raid, Hopa Raidal, 
Juha Rlndlaub, Adam Ring, Dawn Salyar- 
dt, Mlchoal Schuli, Trocy Saarla, Tammy 
Slbtlk, Robart Sotlantkog, Jannllar Sioh- 
mar, and Scott Statonc . 

Alto. Chrlilophar Swombor, Corrl* 
Taylor. Laura Valanzlono, Chrlt Von- 
d*rw**l , Gragory Vltaa, Mlchoal Vltoc- ■ 
nlk. Eugana Wognar, Elliobalh Watart, 
Erlck Wabar. Mlchoal Walnintkl, Paul 
Walth, Patricia Warhana, Koran William - 
ton, Joonno Wilton, and Elltobaih Zalan, 



% 

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Thursday May 15. 1986 



lataond N««npap*m 3A 



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Carmel Spring 



The spring concert at Carmel High School 
for Girls will be presented at 7 p.m. on 
Friday, May 16 and at 8 p.m., Saturday, May 
17 in the school auditorium. Tickets are $2 Tor 
adults and $1.50 for students and senior 
citizens. 

The program, "Ease On Down the Years 
With Carmel," will feature music from the 
'20s through the '80s: country, blues, jazz, as 
well as some current songs. Selections in- 
clude "Ma, He's Makin* Eyes at Me," "I 




Like Mountain Music," "Birth "of the Blues," 
"I Just Called to Say I Love You," as well as 
many other songs. 

Students participating in the show as 
soloists are: Soloists: Michelle Kline 
(Ingleside); Letitia Todd (Lake Villa); 
Tonya Straughn (Great Lakes); Diane 
Wadas (Wildwood); Sally Canfield 
(Libertyville); Beth Ann Rivelli (Gurnee); 
Angie Rivelli (Gurnec); Cindy Fleming 
(Gurnee); Gina Race (Gurnec). Dance: 



Sheri Pink (Libertyville) ; Malcolm Williams 
(North Chicago); Allison Castelani (HiglK 
wood) ; Dawn Kamradt (Wildwood) ; 
Christopher Collins (Mundelein) ; Dian M- 
cEnroe (Ingleside) ; Sue Migely (Arlington 
Heights); Jackie Bond (Libertyville). In- 



strumental: Rita Kazlauskus (Waukeganj; 
Julie Ambrus (Mundelein ) ; -'■■.. Rachellc 
LeBeau (Zion). '. 

Music director is Lynn Henderson; Music 
conductor, Eric Stitz and Sissy DePrima is 
choreographing the show. 



Receive Scholarships 



The Penwasciz Health 
Careers Program at Condell 
Memorial Hospital con- 
cluded another successful 
year with the presentation of 
scholarships to seven 
graduating high school 
seniors during its annual 
capping and graduation 
ceremony. 

Sponsored by the hospital, 
the Penwasciz program of- 
fers an opportunity for area 
high school girls and boys to 
experience a variety of 
careers in the health care 
field through education and 
participation. The name 
"Penwasciz" originated by 
combining the names of pen, 
watch and scissors, the three 
items always carried by a 
nurse. 

Holly Hall and Arena 
Mehta, both of Libertyville, 
received the Condell 
Memorial Hospital Auxiliary 
Scholarships, while Laura 
Muno, of Libertyville, was 
awarded the medical staff's 
Gift of Appreciation. 

Recipients of the Condell 
Memorial Hospital Scholar- 
ship were Kathy Olson and 
Karmyn Wusenich, both of 
Libertyville, and . Jenny 
Morris, of Round Lake. 

Vince Bendinelli, of 
Grayslake, not only received 
the first year cap and pin 
and graduating senior 
certificate, but he also was 
awarded the Dr. Jac Bell is 
Scholarship. • 



Helpful Civic informa- 
tion to acquaint you with 
your community. Call 
the Welcome Wagon 
representative so that 
she may visit you 

Grayslake 

Wildwood 

Lake Villa 

Lindenhurst 

Viola Retdel 
(312)336-5971 

Round Lake 
Area 

Myrtle Klemens 
(312) 546-1617 

Mundelein 

Marion Butler 

(312) 362-1567 

You .are entilled to a 
c-omp.l tm e n t a r y 
subscription from your. 
lometown —lewspapot . 
To. receive your paper 
contact your. Welcome 
Wagon representative 
or : " Call Lakeland 
Newspapers at (312) 
223-8161 



First year, Penwasciz par- 
ticipants received caps and 
pins during the special cap- 
ping ceremony. They were 
Sunil Agnani, Kristan Boyle, 
Chrissie Brown, Suzanne 
Griffin, Vicki Mcllnay, Erin 
Moran, Kim Morgan, 
Margaret O'Brien, Lorraine 
Perez, Dana Ramsey, Beth 
Seal, Jim Snell, Ched 
Vugrincic and Claire West, 
all of Libertyville. 

Other Penwasciz receiving 
caps and pins were Karen 
Becker, Jayne Chase, Chris 
Monroe, Karen Peters and 
Kim Ureche, all of Mun- 
delein; Mario Greco, of 
Palatine; Chris Kendziorski, 
of Ingleside; Cindy Sanchez, 



of Round Lake Beach; and 
Amit Kumar, of .. Lake 
Forest. 

Honored for their third 
year in Penwasciz were Jen- 
nifer Ary, of Gurnee; Karen 
Balmes, Jenny Bloom' and 
Kelly Medick, all of Liber- 
tyville; Anne Brophy, of 
Ingleside; and Tony Pieske 
and Eddie Sullivan, both of 
Mundelein. 

Certificates were also 
presented to all the 
graduating seniors, in- 
cluding the scholarship 
recipients. , 

Holly Hall was named 
president of the Penwasciz 
for 1986-87. 




Scholarship Winner 

Vince Bendinelli (right), Grayslake, receives the Dr. Joe Bellis Scholarship from 
Jane Beese, RN, of the emergency department, Condell Memorial Hospital, during 
the annual Penwasciz Health Career Program Capping and Graduation Ceremony. 




CAPACITY DAYS -fc 

ot 

FOX LAKE • ANTIOCH • WAUKEGAN PLAZA 



4 DAYS ONLY • WEDNESDAY ♦ THURSDAY • FRIDAY • SATURDAY 



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Special Values For Women 

Pykettes Sportswear Coordinates : ;30%0FF 

Haberdashery By Personal .25%IFF 

Misses & Jr. Polo Shirts (Reg. $15 & $16). ...... -*VP ; 

Entire Stock Swimwear 2S%IFF 

Spandex Shorts (Reg, $24).. $ U M 

Entire Stock, Spring & Summer Dresses. . .25%IFF 

Entire Stock, Spring Coats & Jackets }k W ViOFF 

Entire Stock, Loungewear 31% IFF 

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Leather Handbags .30%OFF 



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Girls Knit Tops (Reg. $7.50 & $8.50) *4" TO *5 W 

Boys Tops & Shorts (Reg. $7.50 To $12.50) HP TO T 1 

Special Values For Men 

Haggar Slacks (Reg. $28) ...W 

Entire Stock Mens Sport Coats (Reg. $75 To $110f5S TO 'TO 

Short Sleeve Knit Shirts (Reg. $16) MO" 

Entire Stock Long Sleeve Dress Shirts 25% OFF 

Special Values For The Home 

First Quality Bath Towels (Reg. To $5) , 2" 

First Quality Reversible Comforters (Reg. To $80f 20" 
Plump Poly Pillows (Reg. $7To $9) .-HP 



Enter Our 
Spring Sweepstakes" 

Register For 1 0f 3 $100 
Shopping Sprees 

Name 

Address 

Citv ..... 
Phone . ^ 




Bonus Coupon 

Take An Additional 

10% OFF 

The Sale Price 

kpn any single if&m of your choice. 
Only valid with this coupon 



4A LaUfcMd H&moaptt 



Thuraday May 15, 1966 



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Presidents Wives Pfoy Host 

Angie Moras, Hawthorn Center public relations, second right and John Zweifel, 
creator of White House replica, far right, join "former Presidents and their wives" 
in hosting a press brunch in honor of the displaying of the replica at-Hawthorn. 
From left- are, President and Mrs. U. S. Grantjjacque Vogt and Ken Smouse, 
Antioch), President and Mrs. George Washington (Lake County Coroner Barb 
'Richardson and William Seamann, Antioch) and President and Mrs. Abe Lin- 
coln(Jean Frank, Grayslakeand Robert Wilton, Antioch). — Photo by Gloria Davis. 




business Cards In ft Bottle 

From just ; 15 
business cards 
-create a per- 
sonalized gift to 
_ say "I love you." 

Father's Day 
Sp&ciai 
S34.00 

(AHo#3Wa*k*ForD*U?wty) 

Ov®r SO Designs To ChoeeoFroml 

•JJ Blinkers* 

Clownin 1 Around Gift Shop 

896 Main, Antioch , (312) 395-3770 j \ 





Schedule 
Reunion 

A reunion for all past 
confirmation classes. will be 
staged Sunday, May 18, at 
St. Mark Lutheran Church, 
Lindenhurst 

The reunion is being held- 
as part of the 25th an- 
niversary of St. Mark. 

Confirmands and. . their 

families are invited to attend 

. reunion festivities from 8:30 

a.m. to 1 p.m.,, including 

• regularly worship services 

and social hours. 



IN LINDENHURST 



3 bedrooms 

■■■wz 



2 baths from $125,500 




* Homestead Ranch with 1.694 sq. It. ol living space plus 2 car 
attached garage & basement. Also available are 1 v» and 2 story. 
3-BR. 2fr-bath models with up to 2.200 sq. It. Call lor prices. 

Beck Road & Penn Boulevard 

P.O. Box 6099, Lindenhurst, IL 60046 

(312)356-2400 

Exclusive Sates Agent rrj 

CENTURY 21 Francis Carr Ltd., Realtors * m 



Models open daily, n a.m. -4 p.m., Sat. & Sun. until 5 p.m. 



■ ■ 



SIMMER JOBS 

For Students 

Ages 16 -21 
Lake County Residents 

Up to 40 hours work per week. 
Must meet income guidelines 

CALL YOUTH PROGRAM 

The Pri vate Industry Council 

of Lake County 

(312)249-2200 




§ 9 * 



46 







^Eas 



WmgJheHandic 
Of Lake County 

Chandler's Family Fitness Center 

And 

Athlete's Choice 







5~~ ▼" " (Opening Soon In linden Plaza) 

\PMiS\n Conjunction With Easter Seals Ot Lake County 
%M HW Invite You To Enter The 

"Run So Others Can Walk" 

6.2-Mile Run And 2 Mile Fun Run 



u 



® 



Pier-A-Matic $ 

"The one person/one hour pier" 

EASY TO INSTALL: No huts or bolts- 
unique interlocking design; no parts 
over 20-pounds; one person installs 
40-foot pier in less than one hour. 

HIGH QUALITY MATERIAL: 

Rustproof aluminum and stainless 
steel frame; Centrite decking never 
rots, splinters or, warps; maintenance 
free; 20-year guarantee. 

Windsor Industries Inc. 






Memorial Day - Monday, May 26, 1986 - 9:00 a.m. 

T-Shirts To The First 250 Registrants 

Individual awards will be presented to top male and tem^nrmr^ln^h^slo^at port 

£ C a^a C oM^ 
and 60 and over. 

Sign In: 8:00 - 8:30 a.m. Race Starts: 9:00 a.m. Start & finish at Chandler's Family Fitness Center. 
a Linden Plaza, Lindenhurst, IL 

RE6ISTRATI0M FORM 

MAIL DEADLINE - MAY 21 , 1986 • 



vlT »1; 



Rt.2 



Elkhart Lake, Wl 53020 

(414)8764127 



Thursday May 15. 1?W 




REGISTRATION FEE $6.00. $8.00 DAY OF RACE. 

D6.2 MILE RUN D2 MILE FUN RUN T-SHIRT SIZE DS DM DL DXL 



Name. 



Sex. 



_Age_ 



_Phone_ 



Address : 

. ." hereby release Easter Seals of Lake County, 

Chandler's Family Fitness Center, Athlete's Choice, and d\^W^*£°W 
liability in case of lass, injury, damage or death in connection with the May 26, 
1986 6.2/2 mile runs. 

(parent If minor) 



Signature ' 

To raise additional funds, all runners will be asked to get sponsors, these will be 
picked up at Chandler's or mailed, if registration is mailed ,in. 



Lakeland Newspapers 5A 



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3 



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■"■• ■ .--TT 



Atefcy 






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i 




Biggest Fish Sfory Ever; 
Friday Night Fish Frys 



by GLORIA DAVIS 

Eating fish on Friday reportedly started 
when religious factions made, it a sin to eat 
meat on Friday. Soon, people who had no 
religious reason to do so, got in the habit of 
designating Friday, "Fish Day." 

Today, many restaurant's report that their 
Friday evening dinner hour often draws 
bigger crowds than the traditional Saturday 
night out or Sunday afternoon feast. 

Many people prefer dining out on Fridays 
just to start the weekend off or because they 
don't work the next day, compared to going 
out on a Saturday evening when they have to 
rise early on Sunday for church. 

Friday> dinner specials are also usually 
very resonably priced. 

Friday "all you can eat " fish frys are 
probably the most popular and in the long 
run, the biggest money makers for 
restaurants that have them. 

A supervisor from the nation's biggest fast 
food fish chain, Long John Silver's, reports 
that an "all you can eat" offer brings an 
increase in customers who feel they are 
getting more for their money. 

What really happens is that, taking 
children who pick, women who nibble, and 
people who are filled-up by the normal 
generous portions, into consideration, even 
when adding the high school guys who "pig 
out" and other big eaters, it all averages out 
to one extra piece of fish per customer in a 
promotion that draws three times as many of 
them. 

In the Lakeland area, most restaurants 
have a Friday fish special, just as everyone 
is now featuring Sunday brunch. 

At Zackery's in the Gurnee Holiday Inn, 
one can get a myriad of fish choices from the 
seafood buffet that features crab legs, ser- 
ving from 5 to9 p.m. 



B.L Plenty's in Grayslake adds ribs to its 
seafood buffet for non-fish lovers, available 
from 4:30 to 10 p.m. 

The Rustic Manor in Gurnee has a fish fry 
and the Country House in Antioch has a fish 
and shrimp fry. 

For those with more of a gourmet palate, 
Memories' Porch Restaurant in Trevor 
serves whiting and cod on its come back for 
more menu. They also serve an out of this 
world walleye filet topped with a lemon 
pecan sauce. 

The salmon topped with a special sauce, 
served at the Red Geranium in Lake Geneva 
and at Slerbenz Little Acres outside of An- 
tioch are real Friday taste pleasers, one that 
leaves the diner satisfied but not stuffed to 
the( pardon the pun) gills. 

The oyster bar and shrimp cocktails 
served on the deck that overlook a lake are 
also Little Acres' favorites. 

Mad Dan's in Twin Lakes has long been 
famous for it's outstanding food served for 
reasonable prices. This continues on Friday 
especially with the crab legs and deviled 
crab that are featured items. 

Many lower priced area restaurants serve 
delcious clam chowder every Friday. 

The Gilead House in Wilmot trims its perch 
fry special by preceeding it with homemade 
breads and Wisconsin cheese spreads. 

The long lines in front of the Fairview 
Restaurant in Twin Lakes on Fridays is a 
testation, not only to the fish fry, but tothe 
delicious potatoe pancakes topped with 
applesauce that are always on the menu. 

The "Door County Fish Boil" served 
weekly, starting at 5 p.m. at Olde Fit- 
zgerald's in Twin Lakes is a picturesque and 
palate pleasing experience. 



Blood Drive At Lakehurst 



Lakehurst Mall, in con- 
junction with the American 
Red Cross, will sponsor a 
blood drive Saturday, May 
18, from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. 
The blood drive will be held 
in the community room of 
the mall, located at 199 



Lakehurst Rd. in Waukegan. 
Healthy individuals bet- 
ween the ages of 17 and 66, 
weighing at least 110 pounds 
are encouraged to donate. 
The Red Cross needs to 
collect 1,700 units of blood 
each week to meet the needs 



of over 120 hospitals and 
blood banks served in the 
northeastern Illinois area. 

For more information, or 
to schedule a blood donor ap- 
pointment, please call the 
Red Cross at (312) 949-1000. 



English Folk-Singer To Perform 



Steve Turner, one of 
England's finest folk per- 
formers, will return to the 
David Adler Cultural Center 
for two shows, at 7:30 and 
9:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 
17. 

He plays traditional songs 
from his homeland as well as 
from Newfoundland, 
Scotland, Canada and the 
United States, and Turner's 



array of instruments is 
equally wide ranging: 
guitar, mandola, concertina, 
mandolin and bouzouki. 

Opening both shows will be 
Adler favorites Judy 
Morkrid and Bonnie Biehl, 
whose songs are traditional 
American folk music, whose 
instruments are guitar and 
autoharp, and whose love of 
homemade music is evident. 



The New Midlane Country Club 



Offers... 

Women's 18 Hole League 

Now Forming 

SPECIAL PRICES! 

For Further Information Call Howie Robinson, Golf Director 




COUNTRY CLUB 



\^ 



(312)244-1990 



I liifnt YarliliotiHV liotnl / ti utltiirorlh. Utinois MHlHli 



Awa 






Irene Hahn, 12 year old 
violinist ,f rom . Libertyyille, 
won first -prize ;in the 
Waukegan Symphony Or- 
chestra's Sixth'. Annual 
Fuqua Memorial Young Ar- 
tist's Competition, with the 
playing of Lab's "Sym- 
phonic EspagnoSe." 

Exceptional talent must 
run in the family because, 
her sister,. Sarah, is a 
previous first prize winner in 
the Fuqua Memorial Com- 
petition.' 

There must be something 
in the atmosphere of Liber- 
tyville that stimulattss fine 
musicians because all three 



winners are from 'that 
suburb, - 

The second -place winner 
was Mary; Ann Huang, a 15 
year old sophomore at Liber- 
ty ville High School. The 
young pianist played 
Mozart's "Piano Concerto 
No. 19/' winning a difficult 
decision by the judges over- 
thelhird place winner," Gitta 
Sorenson, 17, a senior at 
Libertyville High School, 

Sorenson, who began cello 
at age five in the first year of 
Waukegan School Dist.'s 
Suzuki program, played the 
Haydn 'JCello Concerto in C" 
lo win her award. 











The Second Annual Lake 
County 4-H Benefit Horse 
Show will be held at 8:30 
a.m., on Sunday, June 8, at 
Big-Z Riding Club in Zion. 

This 'event is. being co- 
sponsored by the Lake Coun- 
ty Mounted Posse. The entry 
fee is $4 per class. A first 
place trophy and five rib- 
bons will be awarded i n each 
class. 

For a show bill, or for fur- 
ther information, call (312) 
249-3683 or (312) 223-8627. 



'Fool' Set For Opening 



"Fool For Love" is Stage 
Two's second show of the 
1986 season. The Obie- 
Award-winning-play, writt- 
en by Sam Shepard, will 
have its area premiere on 
Thursday, May 15. Stage 
Two is a paid-non equity 
ensemble, which performs 
at the College of Lake 
County in Grayslake. 



The play is directed by 
Stage Two's artistic 
director, John Reinhardt. 

"Fool For Love" features 
Cynthia Armstrong as May 
,and Jim Poole as Eddie. 
Armstrong, who lives in Oak 
Park, recently appeared in 
"Tale Of Two.Cities," which 
won two Jeff Citation 



Awards, and whose credits 

include "A Midsummer 
Night's Dream" and "The 
Lion In Winter." 

"Fool For Love" runs 
through May 25. Ticket 
prices are $7 for adults, $4 
for seniors. Reservations 
can be made by calling (312) 
662-4071. 



* MONARK * SEBAG0 * SHARK * B0ATEL * NATIONAL MARINE MFG. ASSOC. 



BOARD SAILERS 



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compl eqpl. 36 hi lime ift|in| 
dii't to lllnelt' J5J.OO0/R 0. 
31? 6717/19 



CHARTERS 



SjiI on the Nr* Wind 31 Sloop. 
I 6 diy ci'jiie 1. * ciptun. Door 
County. t>H. 414 IS* 4/40 

Sul Six Juin or Cull Itfandt- 
Baieboat Sin hit 76. Will 
equipped. Ine C Shop (BP).Bnth 

e»j. wft 9<?3o. ?06-m-sni. 



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Admission is $4.50 for 
adults, $4 for members, $2 
for senior citizens and 
children six-12, and free for 
children under six. 

The David Adler Cultural 
Center, 1700 N. Milwaukee 
Ave., Libertyville, is a non- 
profit organization. For in- 
formation, call (312) 367- 
0707. 



Piei A Malic Iheent ptitonpti 
how pic ' m i lo iniuM. no 
null oi boltl, unique 
inifiicctmi dci'tn; no pull 
o*er JO pounds; one penon 
mil ill 10 loot pitf in leit thin 
one houi. Kith Quality mlteiiall. 
rutlptool ilumiivim ind 
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*npl, munfMiid 'iff. I*enly 
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Induitiits. Inc. Ri( 2 tllhnt 

llkr. Kl 53U?(J. 41* 876-7177. 



VACATION RENTALS 



Diireylpcol it**, viu'ion 
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May-Stp. 17500. tnimimnt. 
betting f imii, mail. *l* %!■ 

3670. 

Whitewater lilt. s*im, bolt, 
Mli. up to 1 bi. 601-756 4674 

SUMMIT lit; bolting no ieii. 
I n h/ ill/ 1 mm. putini. oltJit 
t?75. It lint ute Hi/ *k, i tk tot 
opti H4. 4I4J67 0180, 



48 Chiiitiill. i>. fie cond. 
ent ritnd, Ildlr, phone, tltito 
thr out. 7 i*l. itmlr. itv, thmi. Z 
hdt tr/lll tompiflion stt li/ilt. 
2 L fc!t* pmpt. Ilii ih deck*, slip 
aval 159,900,414 437-1319. 

IV Ri«i Supei Amend. Id bit.' 
*ety lliliin, itkinf S?49.SO0/ 
bcUoliei,SI7 684Soio: 

43 Blueoiltr Sportlith. 10. 
l*m fit ISO Ciutiflm. 
tlybfidie. ndir. lulopilol (ully 
equipped. Sleept 6. 1107.000. 
call 31? 4I676I6, 

Gnnd Bmkt 47. IT. 600 hit. 

ibtolulely loaded, much btllei 
thin new. mutt sell. 301-776- 
5171. ■ 

(I. 41' CC Contt twin 300 tea 
A C. 13311. ole: 50/78 7-8 755. 

1917. 36 X & H ICJfi All Cibm 
lit-lti. iidn. luto pilot, etc. 
Site/trade. 411-464 9150 d)yt, 

35 td 19/5 Chni Cull double 

Cabin -flltt. mityv. 414-769- 

6170. ; 

I910f.ical.bur 11. leu thin 7S 
hit. on i»n Kbit 4Q0 hp 377t, 
ilimUt (ih. tebtt divi i pline 
blue wit pint, i jdios. mini plil, 
cut I piinl, 1 lit lilr. ne« tuts I 
•■lit. '71 Vmtl 21 time ll 
• ciftnlie- nb'i I*" 760i. holly 
hieb tie Itinim cth. lebll di»s, 
nt«lftl.(l(irCUttOmp)iiH. 3 nit 
till. 9-Sii/wlndi 3I7-B3I 4410. 



?V'.(«.ii 170 hp. Tithl Ctulic 
Cillty.ll?.SC0 414.4617374. 

'17. 74' Sri')/ Ci"?iri Ctuilti. 
•/til. 170.000. tint. 719 ■»»• 
4409. - 

'/I Slicttfltl 74, I/O Meic. 1/ * 
loid .till, tuph, nidi. eilm. . 
1II.S0O 31? 3B1IB93. 

Sliebhw'71. 73" Vdune 330hp 
Chi ji. to till, etc cond, 1 7*. 500. 
0. 3I73463S01. L: 317-337. 
3S14. Wettendt:4H-7i| 33S9. 

77.S' Seiuy Cuddy 191*. 771 hp 
Htic. Iinlri, lo hit, miny tut t. 
119,900/80. 61? <9??]40. . 

llBitiCineii77.4S4.3)0lii, 

' 6S- mph, nint.cttni lili.loidtd, 
1IJ.10O. 312 3SI 3376. 

"13 Stiny 21.S'. 721 hp. w/lili, 
7 ti wilt. 115.500. 617 its- 

7?6o. ; . 

71' tteinell Ciulkmi triilei, 
tuelltnl. J 5. tSS. 414-764- 

S 790. 

lsRtnltn2l Cuddy, luilti. 1.6 
III offlC. niny iittlt. lo* h|l, 
m.SOO/ollei 317-7635446, 
70'. HO hp, tilt ft*. Chtyt tn{- 
Jinler. 17.300 m bttl offer. 
Hull Itll! 414 3S7 1109 

19. S'. '14 Biytlnei Cuddy hjid 
lop. rtir conveit. mint, ntvti 
«ed. 19.3SO/BO. 4147I7- 
6671. 

19 t.miuile Rotue 710, 77. W 
loid till. '78. 3S0 Chevy ent. Ill 
cl tlii. 317B44 2169. 



OOATSSAIL 




Witconlin. Late «t|onti 1. 2. 3 
bi hou Kkteptt CQlUtet. J hit lo 
Chiclto, 10 mm to thdtton. 
601 ?S6 6861. 

Sin Oiefo't belt eletint. 

tumnh<"i tC*nh0Ult Ipl. 
1400'*k. SUSO/mo. 619 711- 
74S1. 

Pine li Retoi:, 'tilley. Wl. 
modem cotttt<t. Itihmt'tioitt. 

inciiiyoul. liS0/»k 711 446- 

3689. 

Cocoi Beich-rii, 40 mm lo 
On (ley World, on the btictt. 1 bi, 
?bi. lumtando. 4141678977. 

Oooi County mi, collate lltepi 
6. *ttkly. 414 74J S7SS 

By o*ner; mtiibttthip lo All 
Stiton; Hi ion. Mimltti, II, 1 1 
eimptiounds nation«ide. 4 
Cimptroundl mthin 2 * htl of 
Ch[n uta. fteed lo tell. 14700. 

3l7 6S4 77S7.em. 

Mondl Ktrs-Mfuihon 7 bt 
houte for lent. On cinal ntii 
ocein. 1400/*t. 117-793 9393 

Sin Diefo ecein* bay linl homei 
& tondoi. I ■ a hi. »*t, hot lubi. 
oioehuie 619 296-1000. _ 

M»rco Itllnd. Ill ContJo. 7 bt, 2 
ba on tull, cdmptwtn, pool, 
Itnnit. btlLtt. Summer i atet, call 
117 467 0081/117.682 0741. 



HOISTS 



2 tit* Butf|il I Inn boat honti, 
11.700. call 414 7411646. 



• MOHARK * SEBAG0 * SHARK * B0A1U 



BOAT SHOW 
IN PRINT© 

Going lo over 500,000 households. (1.500.000 
leaders) neir water. 



CALL 414-367-0880. 
Boat-Show in-Prini' is i syndicite'd fcAlurc of Boalei's 
Page. Inc.. Boi 14. 301 Colloimocd Ave.. Ilaitlaiid. Wl 
53029. (« 14) 367-0880. 

MEXr DQAT-SHQW-IM-PRINJ", MAY 29. 1986. 



M0NARK * StBACO * SNARK * BOATEL * 



BOATS-POVYER 



SO Steel Gill Helltt. tadai. 
Uttioit, dll, II8.S00. 419676- 
1000. 



30 Sea Ray HI. etcelltnl 
condition, loo much to htl 
117,500, 317 »S 409J. 

30 Seitiy, "IS. tedan btidte, 
e.eiy lacloiy opt *. 40 hit, 
imimculiti, reduced, 81S-274- 

IV90. 

30 Cabin Cruitti, 1S.000, (ill 
before 17/lttet 7. 414 961- 
17/5. 

'67. 30 ChriKnH Cavaliei. t« 
ent. fully tquipt, Biillol cond, 
11)000/80. Cny 617-412- 
1377, 

71 SS Citiietlt 780 In. on 
hijei Itli. 300 hit, mini cond i 
laiJed.116.S00. 317-4719167 . 
'79 Centuiy Coittt 27'. ill 
aciHSQiiii included, htavy duty 
lih.- lopi. ndio, .liuiti. 
utiniuuhK. miciomvf & mort 
170.SOP. 317381 7197. 

'76 Stimat 76' Salon Ciuner, 1* 
I6S hp i/o. lo hrt. head & falley, 
cutlom leal dl, loaded w/alrat. 
etc cond, 317 833 8791, 

26 Baylinti 1915 7550 Cttlf, 
titty option. All cabin. Viry 
cltin. 177,8'jQ. 4I4-77S8SSO. 

26' Bat Haiboi many iitnt. 
ttailtl incl, mint. Full onus. 
lilt. 414 764.3506, 

BO Stiny 76'. 10' beam 760 
Merc, tedan btdf. tic cond, 
loadd, U Geneva. 171,000. 317- 
299 7480. 



II Ski Supreme. 19'. mini cond, 
low houit. 19.500 or bell oltir. 

3I7-797041I. 

19 Pennyun, leaded, Imltr, 
S7.750. 414 679 1086. 

19' Biytmer. S4 Cuddy, tull 
cirwit, 40 hn, many titiii, 
ll0.000/o)lef.41437S01l?. 

19,'IlSeiny Setille Cutty 170 
10. loided, 175 hn. 19,150. 114- 
171-5071. 

II St nay 18'. mini, loaded. 111 
hp Merc. 111.000. 414 711- 

7785, 

17' (ibei|latt. cloit bow. 75 hp 
out tvmiude. ne« tealt. till lilt, 
n.BSO/bcil, 414. 6*5 7797/ 

1961 Chntcrall til boil. 17, 
rebuilt VI, telin mahotiny, 
Irailti. 15.750. 414 963 9571, 

79 Cteillmer 17'. i/o */65 
Here, lil. 1/995/BO. 617-475- 

3606, 

16" But luck n 1 1, 40 hp Here. 
bettolfti.4144515012. 
14' Alum Runabout, lilr, 36 hp 
Meic. 11000/ollti. 414-527- 

58/7. 

Amencan liitl boat, dcai*i ne« 
boitt. food prices. 312-471* 
3491. 

*74 Gtattion In-llull, tic dm 

boat, MOi/a, lilr. wilt thiubow. 
13.000/beil. 414-673-4107. 



n Allied Mltlidl. cti coclpil. 
lop thipe. 1 c»r.tr. evi: 317- 
615-1178. Oiy. 317 666-3114. 

39' [nclton Cfune, net tqpl. 
: tic cond. alotnic 4, ttbll '15. 
Mutt tell 15S.0u0/beit oltti. 
414 435-9511. 414 1612143 
e«e. 

31' Cutlom Sloop, cntr cockpit. 
Silt. 85 hp dll. 414 154 4740. 

Sailboat, 1979 CtC 36. 

U7.0W. 9u.lt. lude. 414- 787- 
1761. 

Cool !• Ion 35' Rict-fteidr. ti: 
cond. Chi-Mac lit overall. 17 
its, boat ol yi winnit, 159.000. * 
317 787 6636. 117*63 0877. 

-PSN 30 eic cond. full equip. 
loiai, auto pilot, radio. 7 mil, 
tic. 317-771-1/70. 

1 24 Teinon llyci, 39 Ptaiton 
37. tacint ciuiitit. ill tictllint. 

7I5S373682.' " 

57KtFittCruiit 71. itltd 7tlt 
Id. -113.000/ B0. 317 315 4*65 
Sailboat ?»■ Sloop Sreden 1915 
equipped. 414-7171160. 

77 (ncton. out- o*nti vnntt 
home far bttvtilui ■cll-equip 
boat, mid 70 1 Call lor equip 
Int. 31? 1716591. 

Sotinf 77 Imltr. eilm. 
l/.OtO/clfei. 4I4-4715137. 

Catalma 77 . molnr, lilr/elec bi. 
tiltlt. 118.500. 617-893-165 6 
76' Ctippei Uait 1973. 4 taift' 
t»i«t Ittl. llccpt 6. tiailti. 
19.000. 114 541-6656. 

Solmt 26 9". "74, IhntlM hull. 
to-np, ml invtn, iicmf/diy 
tailmi, lilr/ncw lirci, 15,000. 
D. 312 649 7390. I: 3IM5I- 

0067. 

C6C 75. beaul cond, many ■> 
mi. Il5.500/S)ii oil. 311-771- 

4450. : 

25' 1980 Seidlemann. 3 tailt. 
lully equip, nc cond. 6 hp otbd. 
It loader nil. SI 1,000. 617- 
4744J46. 

CLASSIC 
CAir SLOOP IV 

mini cond. bit '71, rcttoied '81. 
wooded '16, ilpt 7. loui mis 
ne«. ciible included. D: 612- 
347-U57. t:6l7-4752328. 

71' Hciint' Sloop. 68. II letl. 7 
tit. 7,5 hp. 18.000, 312-957- 
0091. 

OU)j23, , ;»trli,o/bld9.9*ljl, 
Inol mtlti.'lot. itpt i, crurtt tq. 
113.000. 317-3546S94. 

73 fiantti. 5 inli.8 hp.obradio 
& mote. 18,500. Wldys: 317- 
977-1911. Wt: II? 169 4414. 

27 It. He Or* tor. 1977. pop-top, 
Imltr, tpf (dom, tic cond, I hp, 
15,500. 414 667-2490. 
1971 Rantti. 72'. ncer/ciunti 
m/4 lip o/b. lilr. I lit, many 
tiliat. SIS00. 312 246-5911 
mttt. 

'17. 21' Balboi tibeiilm ml 
boat. :*int led a/Utr. (alt al 
titrit. 110.000. 317-599-7200 

eil 270. 14 f. 83. ; 

H?0 SCOW 1977 Utiles n(m| 
cond. till, 17.600. 117 23?- , 

7152. . 

20 Bilboi. 76. 3 mil. ndio, 
tutu. 6 hn, 15,000. 414-475- 

4349. 

Vicloill It . 4 hp Meic 3 Hilt. 
ttailtl. 16.000. 414 69 1-2897. _ 
1984 Hobie, 16, tinier, lull 
liapete |eir. lile near 11.100, 
414 69I-773D, I im lo 5 pm. _ 

2 Alton Sunluh, 3 bolt tilr. hit 
nut, 17,500.414 357-7759, 

J-24 N3978 diy tailed cutlom 
Uli. mil. 6I7-474-47S6, 



• M0NARK *'SE6AG0 • SNARK * BOATEL *> NATIONAL MARINE MFG. ASSOC. 



6ALak«»»andNewipaport 



Thursday May 15, 1986 



v.* 



AliH > ' . 



Mi! r .ei } -m vbbniiriT 






. "f«raja l >^4Tin.r^j»»v*v , s*a'»'.Pi«n.icji. r 






HLJPM- 



■■ :-.^mmtn0,Kmm«MmmmmmmmmmK^ 



\ \ I . " ■-;'■- 



> >»l*WV ^ 




|tr|lil|giiri Awards At Town & Country Show 

A total of 44 blue ribbons lists: naintina riarlBrwfinat" Thn bnn n w« rk»:^ _:u „.«' . . _ * 



A total of 44 blue ribbons 
were awarded to art exhibits 
in the 28th Annual Lake 
County Town & Country 
Amateur Art Show, ac- 
cording to Extension Ad- 
visor Barbara Dahl. 

The blue ribbon entries 
were selected by judge John 
Fleischer, of Twin Lakes. A 
total of 323 pieces of art were 
entered this year, 231 of 
them adults and the remain- 
der youth and teens. 

The Judge's Choice Award 
in each division was 
received by the following ar- 



tists: painting, Darlene Snet- 
zinger, Lake Zurich; ^Coun- 
try Lane"; photography, Bill 
Jackel, Mundelein, "Ballet 
Shoes"; drawing, Prani 
Bopp, ' Hawthorne Woods, 
"Rachel"; sculpture, Shelly 
Legh-Page, Lake Zurich, 
"Don Quixote & Sandra Pan- - 
za"; miscellaneous, Ruth 
Miller, Long Grove, "An- 
tique Shop" (rug hooking). 

The Best Of Show Award & 
People's Choice Awards 
went to Darlene Snetzinger 
for her oil painting of "Coun- 
try Lane". 



Fete Groups 



The Lake County Fair 
welcomes groups of children 
■ and handicapped persons to 
participate in fun at the fair, 
free of chargcThis special 
invitation will be offered on 
Wednesday,- July ~23 and- 
Thursday, July 24. Escorts 
and chaperones arc also 
admitted without charge. 

To take advantage of this 
special offer, groups must 
write on their letterhead 
informing the fair 
association which day they 
plan to visit and how many 
people are in the group. 

.Write to Walter Krumrey, 
secretary, Lake County Fair 
Assn., P.O. Box 216, 
Grayslake, 1160030. 

After receiving the 
request, Krumrey will 
forward a letter of admission 
which may be used at the 
gate. Free bus parking will 
also be provided. 

The Lake County Fair will 
be held from July 23 through 
July 27 at the Lake County 

To Sponsor 
Art Camp 

The David Adler Cultural 
Center is accepting advance 
registration for a special art 
camp experience for 
children to be held this 
summer. Children who have- 
an interest in art are offered 
an opportunity to . spend 
three days a week drawing, 
painting, sculpting and 
exploring special craft 
projects under the direction 
of Joan Galantha, popular 
children's art instructor. 

The program stresses a 
warm supportive en- 
vironment, activities 
designed to develop positive 
peer relating and encourage 
.self-esteem, as well as 
develop .artistic skills. 
Extensive use will be made 
of the Adler House grounds. 

Two sessions, beginning 
June 24 and July 22 
respectively, will be held. 
Participants meet from 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m., Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Thursday. 
Cost is $200 per session. 
Students must enroll for full 
sessions.' - „ 

The Center-is located at 
1700 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Libertyville. Call (312)367- 
0707 for details and 
registration. Enrollment is 
limited to 15 per session* and 
early registration is en- 
couraged. Ages eight to 12. 

Vets Rally 

The Kenosha Area Viet- 
nam Vets will present a 
"Missing But Not Forgotten 
Rally" from 10 to 4:40 p.m., 
on Saturday, May 17, at 
Civic-Center Park, next to 
Reuther High School, 
. ; Kenosha. 



Fairgrounds, Rtes. 120 and 
45, in Grayslake. 

Admission is $3 for adults; 
children 12 and under are 
admitted free; and senior 
citizens will be admitted for 
half price, . Wednesday 
through Friday. 



The People's Choice rib- 
bon is awarded by ballots 
cast by people visiting the 
show. This is the first time in 
many years, that the 
People's Choice, and the ; 
Best of Show have been the 
same work of art. 

The blue ribbon winners in 
the adult division are 
elegible to enter their art 
work in the Regional Town & 
Country Amateur Art Show 
to be held in Oakbrook on 
June 7; 

The winners in the adult 
division - are as follows: 
Shirley Grego (one blue)'and 
Debbie Pearse (one blue) 
from Antioch; Timothy H. 
Burke (two blues) and D.K. 
Powers (one blue from 
Great Lakes; Jon Peterson 
(one blue) from Gurnee; 
Frani Bopp (one blue) from 
Hawthorne Woods; C.Plum- 
mer (one blue) , from 
Ingleside; Marion Endler 
(one blue) from Lake Villa; 
Paula Kuehl (one blue), 



Come In & Sign Up 
For Summer Leagues 

•Volleyball 

•Pool 

•Snuff leboard 



.165 Forest Ave., Fox Lake 

(312)587-2835 




Ftno Food 



ZACKERY'S 

Sunday Brunch 
Now Only •8 ,s 

Includes Glass Of Champagne 
10a.m. -2p.m. 




Friday Night Seafood Buffet 

5:00 p.m. -9 p.m. 
Featuring Crab Legs 

Now Only ♦lO" 



Back By Popular Demand 

Bab Russell 

In Our Lounge 
Tuesday - Saturday 



Shelly Legh-Page (one blue) 
and Darlene Snetzinger; 
(two blues) from Lake 
Zurich; Linda Egan (one 
blue) from Libertyville; 
Pearl Pedersen (one blue) 
from McHenry; Bill Jackel 
(two blues) and Mary 
Mooney (three' blues) from 
Mundelein ; Sid Groner ( two 
blues) from Round Lake; 
Shirley Koneh (one blue) 
from Spring Grove; Nancy 
Barnas (one blue) from 
Waukegan; and Kent S. 
Belasco (one blue) from 
Wheeling. 

Youth winners were: Kate 
Stack (one blue) from An- 
tioch; Amy Haley (one blue) 
from Ingleside; Katie 
Mariani (one blue) from 
Lake Bluff; Adriaan Jolley 



(one blue) from Round 
Lake; Steve Ha r kin (one 
blue) from Vernon Hills; 
Tony Banach (one blue) and 
Gretchen Hoffman (two 
blues) from Wauconda; Kris 
Chamernik (one blue), 
Stefanie Mucker (one blue), 
and Dana Rodewald (two 



Art Fest 

Applications are being 
accepted for Festival of the 
Arts 1986, sponsored by The 
David Adler Cultural Center. 
The two-day festival, 
combining art and music, 
food booths, and children's 
art activities, will be held on 
Aug. 2 and 3, from 11 a.m. to 
6 p.m. 



h. 




Vic's 



Now Sunday Brunch 
10 Hot Entrou 1 1 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

Salads, FastryToMo 
Adults 'SJS.CaHdroa '4.25 



Enjoy *4.95 Evonlno Dumof Spotiali I Shrimp 
Sunday Through Thursday 



Unc tmn Buffet Tuts. thru. Frt. 

Always 4 Hot Horn* WHh Salad lor 

•3.95 



Saturday Spoclalo • Also Full Monu 

QlMrtltMli'BJ.q.Wfco 

Ofaut Crao Ufa Mo.tl • Uoutor 

Ipiclil rrimi nit 'IIS • All iacJudo Salad Bar 



Friday Wffct Our Faawus'Soofood A No Buffet 

*S.tB 430 p.m. • 1fcOO p.m. 
Early Bird Apodal »4M Borrod Bofero iiOO 

Couto Early For Happy Hour! 



Rts. 120 A S3 In Onyoioko, IL • (312) 1234*00 




blues) from Waukegan; and' 
Johanna Graham (one blue) 
from Wildwood. 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 
(3 1 2) 39502 16 



f * _ , J m f , Ji-| . 

JrrwrTw rTNuj 



pG-n 



Frl., Mon.. thru Thun. 7-9 
Sot. t Sun. J:D£W.30-7.« 



LIBERTY 1 
(31 2) 362 30 1 1 



tl.St 

ti.M r«i »f»i 



PC-tl 



Frl., Mon. thru Thun, • 6:30 8:45 
Sot. A Sun. - ?■*: (56:308:45 



LIBERTY 2 

f312) 362 30 1 1 



it -SO MSotIi 

il.OOFVif Afl.nwM 

SHILLY LOMG 
Stmrta ft Mmy 

Money Pit 

Frl.. Mon. thru Thurt. • 6:45.9 
Sol. I Sun. ■ 3:30 4:30-6:45-9 



PG 




> 'iT :3 f 3 7 r ^T 



WEDNESDAY 



CHtCKTHISOUT! 

Suooo As Sutunoy 



THURSDAY 



WBtUW 

ill 

$450 



m 




wESSBBk 

TSxmmm 

PERCH $ 2* 5 

Served 5-10 p.m. 

AboSemiNemetm Oilier SahodEatim 




SUNDAY 



ImMnt Sin oi" S ml tii 
Ctaoittt Mm I IMit ItH 
Jpmkiii/f h fTpjuouKii 

Introducing 

Smwmmf Pi00tf Spcimk 

Sor?od44»Ja. 






■:■' 



r j 



.5 



Thursday May 15, 1966 



Lakeland Newspaper* 7A 



£-faVftra=ft£. 



"•**£?!» 



; 








S~ 



P.M.& L. Theatre has 
announced its cast for the 
fifth show of its gala 25th 
anniversary season, "South 
Pacific," by Rodgers and 
Hammerstein. This "some 
enchanted show" -is being 
directed by Donna .Badtke 



and she has chosen the 
following, to bring this 
musical treat to you : 

Audra Miles as Ngana, 
Scott Badtke as Jerome, 
Delores Finley as Marie, 
GlennaKisner as Marcella, 



Jane Miles as Nellie For- 

' bush, 'Lou Jones as Emile 

de'Brece, Pat Hill as Bloody 

x Mary,; Kerrieann Nauseda 
"as Liat, Peter Thelen as Lt. 

.Cable,' Steven Jacobs as 
> Harbison, Bill Finley as 



Players Open 'Bri 




Opening night, May 16, 
Waukeganv Community 



Players will be hosting a 
champagne reception 



Waukegan Community 
Players is proud to conclude 
its 30th season with the Ler- 
ner and Loewe . classic 

SffiSffii'-Slsi **mm. perto ™ aTOe - 

lost none of its beauty since All are invited to come up to 
its original staging. the upper lobby and join the 



WAUKEGAN DRIVE-IN 

ON WASHINGTON STREET AT ROUTE 41 ' |312 662-4229 



TOMORROW THRU SUN. - OPEN 6:30 

THE COLOR PURPLE r 

PEISON 

Plus 
A Peter Sellers Classic «and 

•2 HITS 



THE CASE OF 

THE MUKKENESE 

BATTLE HORN 



-v. 



Presents, 



VPre#rlde fr 

Live Band - May ITtli 
Also Live Entertainment May 24S 31 




Volleyball Leagues 

Now Forming, Calf For Info. 



■!, 



iMrgm&mer Garden And H\ 




Wto 



SSSf 



Round take; IL 






VstftfV^^Sg&J* 1 *.!-: 



^ipon 

cast, crew and production 
staff for champagne, punch 
and cheese and crackers. 

Director Norma Cribb 
brings the mythical village 
of Brigadoon to life with the 
assistance of Janet Kilkelly. 
The various Scottish folk 
dances are recreated by 
Mary Abbott, Nylene Nelson 
and Scott Cooper. 
. Conjuring the mood of the 
highlands are Roni Muff, set 
' designer; Dennis Feather- 
stone, lighting designer; and 
Willie DavisMcKennie, set 
construction chairman. 
. Tickets are $6 for adults 
and $5 for students (under 
18) and seniors (65 and over) 
and can be purchased at the 
Genesee Theatre Box Office, 
Terns Luggage, The Side 
Street, or Ticketmaster. 

Tickets may also be pur- 
chased on the nights of per- 
formances at the door. Seats 
are not reserved. 

Performance dates are 
Friday, May 16; Saturday, 
May 17; Friday, May 23; and 
Saturday, May 24.' Curtain 
time is 8 p.m. for all dates. 

A special Sunday matinee 
will be performed May 18 at 
3 p.m. All shows will be held , 
at the Genesee Theater in 
Waukegan, on the corner of 
Genesee and Clayton Sts. 
For more information call 
the Genesee Theatre at (312) 
336-0494. 

Stein metz 

. 

(Plans 
Reunion 

The January/ June class of 
1936 of Steinmetz High 
School, Chicago, will hold its 
50th year reunion on Friday, 
Oct. 17, at. Mr. Peter's 
Banquet, Mount Prospect. 

A visit and tour of the 
school is being planned for 
Saturday morning, Oct. 18. 

Contact Norma (Paulson) 
Bufkhardt at (312) 673-5928 
for further information. 



Capt. ; Brackett, "/Mark 
Badtke as' Stewpot, Randy 
Miles as Biltis, Stan 
Livermore "- as Professor, , 
:Fran Jansta as Adams, 
Shane Kisner as Larsen, 
Frank Torres as Sleeves, 
Sandy Sundberg as Abner, 
Marcus Reynolds as 
Johnson, Joe Vlasak as 
Quale, Jill Cavage as 
Pamela, Rosline Trusky as 
Janet, Ann. Livermore as 
Cora, Debbie, Beno as Sue, 
Cristine Scholtz as Lisa, 
Regina Reynolds as, Bessie, 
Christina Lindberg as 
Dinah, Rosemary Nelson as 
Connie, Debbie Ramsey as 
Bloody Mary's Assistant. 

The show will be presented 
at the P.M.& L. Theatre 
located at 877 Main St. in 
Antioch. Production dates 
are May 30, 31," June 6, 7, 13, 
14, 20 and 21 with an 8:30 
p.m. curtain and June 8 and 
15 with a 2:30 matinee. 

Reservations are a must. 
Call (312) 395-3055 to assure 
a seat for the performance 
one plans to attend. 
Reservations must be picked 
up before 15 minutes of 
curtain time of the reser- 
vation will be voided. 



m r- 



" CHAPEL HILL 

<£z±> coram CLUB 



2soo n. chapel hill rd. 
Mchenry, Illinois 

(815) 385-0333 





Call For Too Times A Pro Shop, Coif 
Course A Driving Range 

(815) 385-3337 

Chapel Hill Golf Club Gas Carts Are 

Not Required On Weekdays. Only On 

Weekends & Holidays Before 3 p.m. 



Summer Dining Hours start May 6th, Tues. - Sat. 
4:30-10. Sunday Brunch 10-2 Sunday Dinner 4-8 



Specials For May 16, 17, & 18 

hit lacks I Sawtraat. ........... .$8.95 

II fc Ift Ep Steak. ..$7.50 

SvccMtit Fii FrM In Siippir $ft95 



Friday Fish Fry 



>l!t 



************* *****************! 

Planning A Wedding? 

\ How* Yours At Plcf iimqu* Hunter Country Club i 
Overlook ing Tho Beautiful Grounds Of Our Golf Courso. 

Some 1986 Dates Still Available 

Enjoy Family Style Or Sit Down Facilities For Up to 375 

Pooplo 

We Ve A Package To Suit Ewryona'* Mmmdt - Call Far Datatt* 



mi:k(oimhy(i.m! 



**L\t» 







{815) 678 2631 



5419 Kenosha St 
Richmond. IL 



Rt 173 I BIckW East 0< Rt 1? 



• ******•*•*•**•****■***** + ***• 

Cwmfoy tUeatew Dancing 

Thursday Evenings 3:00 p.m. , 



Complimentary Shrimp Cocktail 

Friday & Salurday Nights 
If You Order Dinner Before 6:00 p.m. 

restaurant 

3035 BELVIDERE ST.. WAUKEGAN. IL • (312) 336-0222 



36050 N. Granrlwood Dr. - The 
GurneeJII. 60031 




(312) 
356-5200 



Where You Can Cook Your Own 



Featuring 

Steaks • Seafood 

Dinners From S10.95 



Tues.-Thurs. 5:00*10:30 

Frl.* Sat. 5:00-12:00 
Sun. 4:00-6:00 



* ORANOWOOD 

DRIVE 



49 



Nt 



Rte. 132 



»* 



: FREE Dance $**** 
Lessons 6:30-8:30 * 

By Mike Tremont & Florence Warner 
Music by "The Southern Winds" 
No Cover Or Admission Charge 

Friday Listen To The AAusic Of 
"Southern Winds" 

Sunday, Kick-up Your Heels & Dance To The Wonderful Mubic Of 

"The Marks" 

A t Our Sunday Tea Dance 

3:30-6:30 p.m. FREE Lessons 2:30-3:30 




(81 5) 676-2631 



HUNTER COUNTRY CLUB 

541 9 Kenosha St 

Richmond. IL Rt. 173.1 Blk. East Of Rt. 1 2 



*••••**•••*•*• 



• ••••*•••*••* 



OA lakeland Newspaper* 



Jhtutdq¥Mq*t5,.1986 






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w * f»M f ll ^#l i Pt*»* ■* - «■ 



i Al^'&«W«tfMar -fit**? »ii>**i *f**£MmmJm 



H" 1 ***! f« Wit B. 



iti*n^^^iMfe<mwU3B|gU0&K*<lttt^ 



.v J "Vv*Vi(i* , te4tt<Msp5U** 



*-*.*.» • 4 fifti^^a* 



ft * 




Kids Preview Orchestra's Annual Spring Concert 



.-Exciting things are .hap- 
pening, this spring as the 
Chain O'Lakes Orchestra 
practices for its annual 
spring concert to be held on 
June 22, at 2:30 p.m., at 
Grant High School in Fox 
Lake. 

A rehearsal' was attended 
by the Glitter Girls Club of 
Round Lake, a group of ap- 
proximately 13 little girls 
who are' being taught' to in- 
volve themselves in the com- 
munity and express then - 
selves creatively. 

Expect to see more of the' 
Chain O'Lakes Orchestra 
members as they "become 
involved" in their com- 
munities this spring. Mem- 
bers have recently per- 
formed at their local AARP 
meeting, at the Lakeland 



On May 21 a string trio, 
representing the orchestra, 
will be playing for the Nor- 
thshore Society of the Per- 
forming Arts. 

On June 8 a number of the 
Chain O'Lakes ensembles 
will participate in the 
Lakehurst Art Festival. The 
program will be presented at 
1 p.m. and again at 2 p.m. 

Anyone interested in 
knowing more about the Glit- 
ter Girls Club can call Karen 
Nowak at (312)546-4561. 

Those interested in 
knowing more about the 
Lakehurst Festival Program 
or the annual spring concert 
can call Georgia Cobb at 
(312)587-9171. Both per- 
formances are free to the 
public. The annual spring 



Apartments in Fox Lake, at concert is partially funded 



the Northshore Society of the 
Performing Arts, and at the 
Fox Lake Baptist Church. 




ni 



by a grant from the 
Waukegan Area Arts Coun- 
cil. 



II 




College of Lake County 
piano teacher, Kathleen 
Whitmer Cizewski, has 
achieved special 

professional recognition by 
the Music Teachers National 
Assn. as a nationally cer- 
tified teacher. 

Cizewski was recom- 
mended for this advanced 
professional standing by the 
Illinois Music Teachers 
Assn. on the basis' of 
academic achievement and 
high professional standards 
in the field of music, 
pedagogy. This includes 
musical competence, 
teaching - preparation, and 
successful performing and 
teaching experience. 

She holds a master's 
degree from DePaul Univer- 



n t 



sity and a bachelor's degree 
from Chicago Conservatory 
College with a piano per- 
formance/organ minor. 

Cizewski works part-time 
as a class and private piano 
instructor and staff ac- 
companist at . CLC and 
teaches at Harper College, 
Palatine, and maintains a 
private studio in Waukegan.' 

As a member of the 
National Guild of Piano 
Teachers, Illinois State 
Music Teachers Assn., and 
Music Teachers National 
Assn., she has served ad ad- 
judicator for several piano 
andorgan festivals. She per- 
forms regularly, including 
previous concert ap- 
pearances for WJOB radio, 
"Hammond, IN, WGN-TV and 
WTTW-TV. 



I 
I 
I 
I 

1 
I 
I 
I 



| Kentucky Lake Vacatioitland 

I &*uat '^ — SJIW1 

on beautiful =^£tW 

Kentucky Lake 

• Resorts • Motels • Marinii , 
• Cempgibunds • Houseboets 

Call now tor Information 502'527*7$65 

or mil) coupon to 

Kentucky Uk« Vtcattonlind 

for FIIU §4 p*9* Lake Quid* 

KLV,DeelCB 

•oi 148-8, teuton, Ky. 42028 




Hum _ 



ttote. 



*P- 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 





Robby Schmalfeldt 
Orchestra Member 



Miss Nowak 
Member Glitter Girls 



© • O 



■ 1 1 1 



HiHlli 



Z 



AU 



z 




STEAK AND SEAFOOD HOUSE 



DAILY EVENING SPECIALS 

Serving 4 p.m. til 1 1 p.m. 

iH.Itt$tlKk.....'7.» Tlift.CWckiillih.'J.M 
Tns. SpkM Shal. .TJB FiiFitbF^ 

Itihmlik US lie Mmt W...'4,li| 



SALE! 
BANANA 



IrSWwr B*^HR^8BwwM HRVI I V ^H^V^V 

SHIRLEY SMITH and friends 

"BAGS TO RICHES" 

$ 1 4eM COi p lete (Noon Lunch 1 :30S„ov»X 

Available Dates - May 15, 21, 22, 27, & 28 

Special ifenloa Performance 
May 27, 6:30 Dinner- 8:30 Show, $16.00 Complete 
Reservations Required 



Sunday Brunch 10:30 a.m, - 1 :30 p.m. 
AMMf.NfCblMm W aedlMtf $1.15 



• • • 



For Reservations Or Information Call 

(815)678-2671 

'/a Mi. North Of Rte. 173 On U.S. 12 

Richmond, Illinois 

Member Mdtainj 'County Betteunnt Aaotiatlen 

inn 



li iiiiim i 






SPUT 




Monday 5/1 2 Thru 
Friday 5/16 



We've never hod a mote 

scrumptious sale. Fresh, tropical 
banana is on sale. Rich, thick choco- 
late. Juicy-red strawbeiry. Tongy pine- 
apple. Cool and creamy DAIRY QUEEN* 
son serve. They're all on sale because 
>ari at 



Spill. Now onty 99' Al your partici- 
pating DAIRY OUEEN* slore. 

WfTftfATYOUMGHT 



/ 



Fox Lake Dairy Queen 

Corner Of Rt. 12 And Grand Ave. 
©AMoaco.pyiMi Fox Lake . 



I 







$g95 



Best Prime Rib 
In Town.'.'-. 



Broiled Fresh 
Whitefish . . . 




Complimentary Shrimp Cocktail 

Served Friday And Saturday To 

Everyone Who Orders Dinner 

Before 8:00 P.m. 



taunutt 



3035 BELVIDEREST., WAUKEGAMRESERVATI0N$(312} 336-0222 







Present*... 

The Area Premiere 

Of Sam Shepard's 

Award Winning Play! 

44 



1 



FOOL 
FOR 
LOVE" 

MAY 15.16,17,23,24- 8:00 P.M. & MAY 25 • 3:00 P.M. 

AT THE: 

COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY THEATREBLDG *5 

19361 W. Washington Grayslakc 






i 

CALL 6 62 4^7J_^RJT1FpRMATIOr<,& RE^iy^nO^ ^^ J 

^H t^^*^*^^t« VMM MMt) I _ ^T^H H^8^8B^R^B1 ^Ri 9Mm 9M3T^^^fMm 



PREVIEW NIGHT, THURS. MAY 15| 
TWO FOR OWE WITH THIS AD I 



JhuridayMoYl5 l 19S6 



Lak«4ar>d N*wtpap«ri 9A 



Ik- 






.-;. ; .-..- i - 



St* 






>>}>"-. If: 



■• . _ ..■■-.. 









!! 

til 



LaRouches Deal 




lQ 



i Mu 



by JOHN STEINKE 
(Political Columnist) 

Lyndon H. LaRouche Jr. is 
the unorthodox politician 
whose followers are 
worrying the Democratic 
Party because they won up- 
set victories in Illinois' Mar- 
ch 18 primary. 

Two members of 
LaRouche's radical 
organization won the 
Democratic Party's 
nominations for two 
statewide offices. Mark 
Fairchild was nominated for 
lieutenant governor and 
Janice Hart was nominated 
for secretary of state. 

Their victories prompted 
Adlai E. Stevenson III, who 



won the primary for gover- 
nor, to proclaim that he 
Would not run on the same 
ticket with them because of 
their extreme views. 

Stevenson has charac- 
terized Fairchild and Hart 
as "Neo-Nazis." Under 
Illinois, statute, a vote for a 
gubernatorial candidate 
automatically is a vote for 
his running mate in the Nov. 
4 general election. 

So a Stevenson victory as a 
Democrat would have made 
Fairchild lieutenant gover- 
nor, first in line to become 
governor if Stevenson 
vacated the office. 

Last month, Stevenson 
resigned as the Democratic 



candidate for governor in an 
attempt to run as an in- 
dependent, in the November 
election. It was a move to rid 
himself of his two LaRouche 
running mates. 

Stevenson has filed suit in 
federal -court challenging a 
state election board's' rule 
that requires independents 
in the November contest to 
have filed papers declaring 
their candidacies by last 
Dec. 16. 

If Stevenson's legal suit is 
unsuccessful, he has the op- 
tion to field an entire third* . 
party ticket: The filing date 
for third-parties is August 4. 

Stevenson, a former U.S. 
senator, is making a second 





Hand 



attempt to unseat With popular U.S. Sen". 
Republican Gov. James R. Alan J. Dixon leading the 
Thompson. In 1982, he lost to Democratic slate, it was«-v 
% m ^?" ?? fffiZ!^ S? pected that Stevenson would 

defeat Thompson in a remat- 
ch. 



of v3.6 million, ballots cast in 
the contest 



The Stevenson withdrawal 
from the party ticket leaves 
Fairchild without a running 
mate. It is up to the 
Democratic State Central 
Committee to fill that spot 



To Sponsor Fund-Raiser 



Illinois Bell's United Way 
Workplace Presence Com- 
mittee will be sponsoring a 
Shop & Share fund-raising 

program for the Waukegan 
Senior Center on May 19, 20 

and 21, at all Jewel Food 
Stores. 

By shopping at Jewel on 



one of those days,- five per 
cent of the total purchases, 
excluding tax and Osco mer- 
chandise, will be donated by 
Jewel to the organization. 

The Waukegan Senior Cen- 
ter plans to use the money 
generated by the Shop k 
Share to provide additional 
transportation for the 



seniors. Anyone interested in 
helping the Waukegan 
Senior Center by shopping at 
Jewel on those dates should 

use the "Shop & Share Iden- 
tification Certificate". Con- 
tact John Sefron at (312) 249- 
3500 to obtain certificates 
before shopping. 







L A 



* 



An effective and cost-efficient 
way to advertise! Flyers wi 
be printed in black ink on 514" 
x 814" 20# bond paper in your 
choice of colors (blue, pink, 
green, canary, ivory). 




•Plus Sales Tax 



A $60.50 Value 



Call us for all your printing noeds. Free estimates. 



- 



Lakeland 

Publishers 

30 South Whitney Street 
Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

(312) 223-81 61 



• Fwt 



Tmm • F« Lafet Pro. 
UmTmn • Graplafct Tm 
Pro* • Lakt fifa Imri 



. -i- ■ 



>- 



Open House Sat & Sum 



May 1 7 & 18,10 o.m. - 6 p.m. 
60 Malt's Rd., F.L. 




Pisfake© lokefronl homo in Fox Lake's most 
panoramic view of the Chain - Built 19SO. 

•Low Maintenance Ym Round Ranch •**'* lo Unit 4 inoppinf 

•3 Bediooms «N*w Umm 

■2 full Bat hi ■fnrpijce with blower 

■Modern Kitchen with built in oven t unit *Z stutdf lull sue putts 

•Spacious Imng & dininf room with wtjp jiound ptctuie windows 

•Ideal flow plan • perfect tor enlHliinini 

High & dry wooded double lot, huge block-top drive, 
cement seawall, new pier, city sewer 

By Owner » 120,000 

, - , , J y , 2 A 5 . Wtt S S . —— 



POLLUTION VARIANCE 

The Village of Round Lake Beach, on 
behalf of its public water supply, located in 
the Village of Round Lake Beach, in Lake 
County, has filed with the Pollution Control 
Board a petition for variance under Title IX 
of the Environmental Protection Act. The 
Petitioner requests a variance from 35 III. 
Adm. Code 602.105(a) and 602.106(b) so 
that Restricted Status will be lifted despite 
having violations concerning combined 
radium 226 and 228. The purpose of the 
petition is to be able to obtain construction 
and operating permits for new water main 
extensions. 

The Environmental Protection Agency 
solicits the views of persons who may be 
adversely affected by the variance. Ad- 
dress any comments or inquiries to: Wayne 
Wiemerslage Staff Attorney. IEPA, 2200 
Churchill Road, Springfield, Illinois 62706; 
phone 217-782-5544. 

If a written objection to the variance is 
received by the Pollution Control Board, 
State of Illinois Center. 100 West Randolph, 
Suite 11-500, Chicago, Illinois , 60601. by 
May 13. 1986, the board must conduct a 
hearing on the petition. 




If you need help overcoming a 
drug or alcohol problem, Victory 
Memorial Hospital has programs 
which can help put your life 
together again. 

We offer in-hospital and out- 
patient programs. Our out-patient 
evening program allows you to 
keep up with your daily life even 
while you are in treatment. 



We also offer family counseling— 
including programs for children— to 
help your loved ones work out the 
problems you are all facing. 

And you'll be pleased to know 
that our programs are fully covered 
by many insurance plans. 

Gain control over your life. Call 
312-688-4357, any time. Day or 
night. That's 68B-HELR 



VICTORY 



MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1324 North Sheridan Rd. Waukegan, Illinois 60085 



1 0A lakeland Newspaper* 



ThurtdayMay15,19B6 



■ . < n * . ■ .» , 



■ if-, i .» mm mttjl iunm *j f m f *f* iw v imt m < ir >*^ n tt 



si'\ 



:3»---*>»«' J 'ti*y!S3isi«tei aaB^ 



■BglfS@£ 






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'ion 



Set For Rev 

A farweU reception will be 
held for Rev. Gregory Klein, ; 
O; Carm;' at Carmel • High 
School for Boys, Sunday, 
May 25 from 2 to 4 p.iri. in the 
Carmelite Monastary. 

Fr. Klein, who has served 
as principal of the high 
school since 1919, will begin 
serving the Carmelite Order 
as superintendent of schools 
for six high schools in North 
and South America: Mt. 
Carmel" on Chicago's south 
side, Joliet Catholic in Joliet, 
Carmel High School for Boys 
in Mundelein; Salpointe 
Catholic in Tucson, Ariz., 
Crespi Carmelite High 
School in Encino, Calif., and 
Our Lady of Mount Carmel 
High School in Lima, Peru. 

Ft. Klein will also - be, 
working as a part-time 




educational consultant for 
Anderson/Roethle and 
Associates, a .Milwaukee- 
based firm, and hopes to. 
complete: a, .doctor of 
ministry degree from St. 
. Mary of the Lake Seminary 
in Mundelein. 

The Carmelite Order has 
appointed Rev. William J. 
Harry, 0. Carm., as the new 
principal of Carmel High 
School for Boys, effective 
May 30. Fr. Bill is a native of 
Louisville, 'Ky. He received 
his bachelor of arts degree 
from Marquette University 
with a major in history and 
minors in philosophy and 
education. 

After completing his 
novitiate year with the 
Carmelites, Fr. Bill joined 
the faculty of Salpointe 



Catholic High School in 
Tucson, Ariz., where he was 
involved in a number of the 
school's programs and 
taught religion, psychology, 
science and social studies.. 
During that time he earned a 
master of education degree 
in educational- ad- 
ministration from the 
University of Arizona . 

Fr. Bill studied theology at 
the Pontifical Gregorial 
University in Rome where 
. he earned a baccalaureate in 
sacred theology. He will soon 
complete a licentiate in 
sacred theology with a 
concentration in spirituality. 
After his ordination, Fr. Bill 
returned to Tucson where he 
worked as campus minister, 
religion teacher and retreat 
program director. 




Circus To Loire County 



The Tebola Shrine > Circus will be coming to the Lake County Fairgrounds in 
Grayslake on July U. 15and 16. This is the first time the shrine circus will be held 
m Lake County It is being run in conjunction with Tebala Motor Patrol bf 
Waukegan The Lake County Circus Committee consists of : from left-Geno Harris, 
Sparkles The Clown, Don Johannes, John Boy The Clown, Robbie Roberson and 
Cee Cee The Clown. — Photo by Craig Vogel . 



saiat tberc.ese mer>fcaL ceoteRL 




S.T.A.R. Hospice 
help jmake our S.T.A.R. brighter! 

We are in great need of Volunteers to help 
in the following area: HOMECARE, 
BEREAVEMENT, INPATIENT, SECRETARIAL 
AND OTHERS. 

WE WILL TRAIN. 

Orientation begins Saturday, June 7 

Please Call 

012) 360-2220 



. . 



Where canyou meet royalty, 




visit fi 
and pursue 





AtAmeripex'86, 

the worlds fair of stamps. 

Stamp collectors and dealers the 
world over arc coming to Chicago in May 
for the most lavish philatelic festival ever. 
It's going ip be quite a show! • 

And it'll feature some big names, too. 
Although Queen Elizabeth hcrselfcan't 
come, shes sending over the 
next best thing— rarities 
from -tliciRoyal Stamp 
Collection— in theper- 
sonalcare.ofthe , 
Keeper of the Royal 
Collection! 

Look for other 
Koyiit Collections, top, 
plus hundreds of pri- 
vate exhibits totalling an 




extraordinary 64,000 jwges. 
For your own collection, 
there'll lie everything from 
starter packs to priccless^rari- 
tics. Including the U.S. Postal 
Service's Presidential stamps 
and other colorful commemo- 
rative issues. 

For kids only, there'll be a 
. ; free packet containing stamps, first day 
covers, and a topical collecting kit. Plus 
games and a chance to meet Ben Frank- . 
Tin! And lots more! <3. 

You'll sec it all at the 
O'Harc Fxpo Center, 
5555 N. River Rd. 
Roscmont, IL, 
from May 22 
through J unci. 
Admission is 
$2.50 a day (chil- 
dren under 12 
admitted Tree). 
Come sec 
the world at 
Ameripex '86! 




Ameripex'86 

Once In a Lifetime. 



No business will be transacted on 
Monday, May 26, Memorial Day. 
Regular business hours will resume oh 
Tuesday, May 27. Have a safe and 
Happy Memorial Day. 

Our 24-Hour Automatic Toller Machine is 
open 24 hours a day — 7 days a weak. 



FIFTY FIVE EAST GRAND AVENUE • FOX LAKE. ILLINOIS l CTHi* 

313/5*7 11 11 JXJIVsl 



There are fantastic growth 
opportunities in the stock market!! 

How can you pass 




mana 

78% for the 12 



March 31, 1986 and 25% as of 
January 1, 1986? 




and ask about the Kemper 
International fund. 



For more 

information 

call us at 

(312) 623-0245 

or mail this 
coupon 

Today! 



j Yes. I would Uke more information on 

I □ Mutual Funds I 

| □ Emerging Growth Co. □ Listed Stocks | 



. DOTC Stocks DOptions 
I □ Other DTax Shelters 

| Name. 



[Address. 

i 
i 



.Home Phone. 
_Work Phone. 



3 



TtH? 



Illinois Company, 

® Sf ' llKOI|KH.Itri1 



221 Washington St. 
Waukopan, IL 60085 

. The above yields are current yields but are all subject to change. 



/ ■ 



:i 



t 



j 

.i 



I 

:: 

'U 

m 



ii 

a 












Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 



Lakeland Newspaper* 1 1 A 



& ! ! 



-.— 



m«. « ■' ! ■>■ * ■ 



.« *t—— *yi. iim»i' i 






> 



Ardeerr Gefs The Job Done For Right Turn Lane 



by AKDKEN HARRIS 
<HI2> 395-2781 

Thank you to all of you who 
took the time to write and 
call the deppartement. of 
transportation. We have our 
right-turn-only lane on the 
corner of Grass Lake Rd. 
and Rte. 59. They did it 
before the middle of May! 
Hurray ! Throw your war- 



Steve Stachura, his mint 
condition YZ80. We, Kim 
Diehl : and Tami Johnson, 
leave to Marina Stafford, our 
tasting energy. I, Shona 
Bardecki, leave ; to: Wendy 
Kaufmann, my fancy hairdo. 
We, Brian Weeks and John 
Cote, leave to Scott Soltis, 
John's crutches and Brian's 
"baby blues;'' l> Ken Matt- 



Grass Lake News 



ning tickets away! They, 
were so fast in putting in the 
arrow, by the time I got to 
the corner with my camera, 
they were gone. 

May 9 was an exciting 
evening for the seventh and 
eighth graders at Grass 
Lake School. It was the night 
of the eighth grade dance, 
the special dance where 
everyone dresses in their 
finest. Pizza was served, the 
music played, arid the gym 
was decoreated in pastel 
spring colors. Parents were 
eager to take pictures and 
the students were gracious 
enough to get into a large 
group for a class photo. The 
last will and testament was 
read as follows: ."We. the 
Class of '86. being of insane 
minds and unsound bodies 
leave the following to the 
Class of '87 — We, Peter 
Houle and Chris Lehner, 
leave to Jeff Hcnning our 
amazing ability tocharm the 
girls with our good looks and 
our awesome snowmobiles. 
We. Stacey Zbylut and 
Teresa Clifford, leave to 
Shelley Brausam, our ability 
to be friends with everyone. 
We. Michele Skrypt and 
Heather Flood, leave to 
Deanna Olenick. our ability 
to be "true blue" friends to 
people, without ever 
fighting. We, Wayne Olson 
and Ricky Starr, leave our 
good grades and our muscles 
to Mike Jorudd and Keith 
Ritzert. We. Chris Varno and 
Eric Wimmer, leave to Mike 
Wix. our lockers and a 
bucket of soap and water. 
We. Mike Priller and Chris 
Gillihan. leave to Chuck 
Haling, our detentions and 
our honor roll brains. We, 
Joe Rohde and Brian 
Fehrenbacher, leave to 
Ericka Diehl our charcoal 
grill and starter fluid. We, 
Bill Frohmeier and David 
Clauson, leave to Mr. Clark 
and Ray Lauer, our petite 
figures and damaged pan- 
creases. I. Jeff Rey. leave to 



..Danny 
terrific 



son. leave to. 
Romanski, ' my 
athletic ability. 

I. Jenny Harris, leave to 
Jeana Nord my baseball 
talent and one of my ha ts, the 
blue one. We, Amy Glasgow 
and Cathy Cramer, leave to 
Nicole Gannon our books and 
popularity. We, Jacque 
Sherwood and Delfina 
Carlin, !i leave to Tiffany 
Chris topoulos our height, our 
loud voices, and our figures. 
We, Randi Terry and 
Christina Aker, leave our 
abiltiy to keep quiet and be 
smart when necessary to the 
Class of *87. ■ 

We, Mark Parker and 
David Wechselberger, leave 
to Jason Nolan our skilled 
motorcycle riding 

techniques and our ability to 
stay out of trouble. We, Mike 
and Carl Campbell, leave to 
Jason Kitto our Fruit of the 
Loom award. We, Jenny 
Lehmann and Tracy Podock, 
leave to Corky Madden our 
baseball mitts. We, Richie 
Cheterbok and Karl 
Johnanesen, leave to Aaron 
Martin our handsome 
physiques and our awesome 
sunglasses. I, Jill Hines, 
leave to Theresa Hoeppner 
my blonde hair and great 
times at Grass Lake School. 
I, Carrie DeFalco, leave my 
quiet ways and secret supply 
of gum to Adam Holtzinger 
and Jenny Vandrush." 

The weather was perfect; 
the company was great. Who 
could have asked for 
anything more for the Class 
of '86's last dance at Grass 
Lake School? They will be 
going on their class trip May 
27-29. And then the big day, 
graduation on May 30, at 
7:30 p.m. 

There will be' an awards 
program at Grass Lake 
•School for grades one 
through five, on May 23 at 2 
p.m. Be sure you get your 
tickets for the PTO dinner 
dance to be held on Friday, 
May 16 at Harbor Ridge 



Church To Present 
Family Film Series 



The Antioch Evangelical 
Free Church will present a 
six-part film series by Dr. 
James Dobson, entitled, 
Turn Your Heart Toward 
Home. The series em- 
phasizes the importance of a 
loving home for children 
where Christian values are 
instilled. 

Dr. Dobson examines 
modern pressures on 
parents, suggesting that 
many problems are caused 



by humanism and the in- 
fluences of radio, television, 
films, and the press. 

The first film of the series, 
A Father Looks Back, will be 
shown on Wednesday, May 
21, at 7 p.m. The remaining, 
films will be shown at the 
same time every Wednesday 
from May 28 to June 25 . 

The Antioch Evangelical 
Free Church is located at 
Tiffany and Highview Drives 
in Antioch. 



Graduate Nowak 



Karen D. Nowak, Antioch, 
is one of the career 
graduates who will receive a 
diploma from Patricia 
Stevens Career College of 
Milwaukee in com- 
mencement exercises to be 
held on Saturday, May 24, at 



Uihlcin Hall of the Per- 
forming Arts Center. 

Nowak is the wife of Ray 
Nowak of Antioch. She will 
graduate from a nine-month 
accredited fashion mer- 
chandising course. 



Country, Club. A great night 

of fun is awaiting those who 
attend. 

Tickets are. going fast, so 
be sure to contact Linda 
Boerman, Marie Brausam, 
Lorrie Cnrisjoupolus, Chris 
Peiller or Bonnie Dem- 
binski. Music will be 
provided by the Dancing 
Machine I,' and dinner 
tickets are 911 per person. 
The menu is chicken and 
beef- served- buffet style. 
Cocktails (cash bar) start at 
6:30 p.m. and dinner will be 
served at 7:30 p.m. 

Brownie Troop 1366 is -in 
the news' again: On May 2 
and 3 the first and second 
grade Brownies of Troop 
1366 had their overnighter at 
the Scout house in Antioch. 
On Friday evening, the 
leaders and girls shopped for 
food to be consumed over the 
weekend. After shopping, 
the girls gathered kindling 
for a fire. Once the fireplace 
was going they had ice 
cream sundaes while 
working on a solar energy 
project as part of the Green 
and Growing patch. The. 
evening continued ■ with 
popcorn and juice while 
watching movies. The first 
girl to fall asleep was Jamie 
Brausam. After a Saturday 
morning breakfast from 
McDonalds, the girls worked 
on a Mother's Day craft, 
practiced for the Fly-Up 
ceremony, finished their 
badge work, had pizza for 
lunch and went home. Those 
Brownies who earned their 
Overnighter patch were: 
Sandy Benes, Jamie 
Brausam, Kelley Brausam, 
Kendra Charts, Tara 
Christoppulos, Kellie Dixon, 
Kristen Franzen, Cynthia 
Jones, Jennifer Lentine, Lois 
Morreale, Tammy Mazzuca, 
Lisa Priller, Rebecca 
Sheldon and Sandra Webel. 
Adults participating were: 
leader, Sue Cramer; co- 
leader, Chris Priller; and 
first aider, Marge Benes. 

The 12th Congressional 
Women's Republican Club 
will have their annual spring 
meeting on Tuesday, May 20, 
at 7:30 p.m. Don Totten will 
be the guest speaker and the 
meeting will take place at 
the Barrington Area 
Library", 505 Northwest 
Hwy., Barrington. Totten 
will be speaking on "How the 
political activities in Cook 



County impact on 
surrounding counties." 
There will also be a special 
vote on whether the 
Women's Club will become a 
general 12th Congressional 
Dist. Club. Reservations will 
also be taken for the annual 
spring luncheon with: 
Congressman Phil Crane 
planned for Sunday, June 8. 
.Birthday wishes were left 
out of last week's 'column 
and I apologize for that, but 
my column was too lengthy 
and something had to go. In 
addition to the previous 
birthday wishes, Mrs. 
Treiger celebrated her day 
on May 5. Ms. Boesdorfer, 
fifth grade teacher at Grass 
Lake School, celebrated her 
day on May 4. Jason Paulhus 
celebrated his day on May 
13. He is. in Ms. Boesdorfer's 
class, • and . is 11. Helen 
Didomiriicis celebrated her 
day on May 13, and husband, 
Joe, will celebrate May, 17. 
Richie Jaschob will be 
another year older on May 
25. And happy birthday' to 
Carl Campbell, who will 
celebrate another- year on 
May 31. 

There is an area-wide 
garage sale planned for the 
Bluff Lake Rd. area. So far, 
six families are planning to 
be involved. This event will 
take place June- 5*8. If you 
live off of Bluff Lake Rd. and 
are interested in joining the 
event, contact this colum- 
nist. So far there will be a 
garage sale on Mallard, 
Lakeview, Oak, Channel and 
Elime Rds. Anyone else 
interested, please call. 

New computers have been 
added to Grass Lake School, 
thanks to the Illinois State 
Board of Education and the 
use of ECIA Chapter II 
funds. The school has 
received $1,946.20 and that 
has been used to purchase 
new equipment and 
materials. Two Apple 
computers and ac- 
companying software have 
been purchased. One of the 
computers is being used by 
the intermediate grades and 
the other is being used by the 
junior high students. 

The school had a special 
thank you to Judy Kelly in 
the last newsletter for 
donation of a graduation cap 
and gown to add to the 
supply. Remember while 
spring cleaning, if you find a 



graduation gown in: your James Mazzuca, Brad and 

closet and don't know what Richie received, a blue" 

to do with it, please give it to ribbon for winning their first 



the school for future use. 

This is the fourth quarter 
of the school year. The junior 
high activity program has 
added new electi ves for the 
school. Grass Lake is of - 



heat of ; the ' competition. 
Each received "a ■par- 
ticipation ribbon. 
Congratulations to Brad 
Priller and Jeff Fleishman 
who each won a fishing pole 



fering will and prophecy, for selling the most spaghetti 



classical music, tennis, 
library-video aides, junior 
high music, knitting- 
crocheting, primary aides, 
intermediate aides, 
calligraphy-sign painting, 
typing, newspaper, puppet 
workshop, chess-checkers 
and sculpture. 

The 4-H office is looking 
for fair superintendents for 
many areas. If you are in- 
terested in helping out at the 
Lake County Fair, contact 
the Lake County Extension 
Office at (312) 223-8627, and 
ask for Norma Schott. She 
will let you know more about 
the program and where your 
help is needed. The 4-H mini- 
fair will take place June 27 
and 28. AH entries are due in 
the 4-H office by May 30. If 
you are doing food 
demonstrations, general 
demonstrations, cats, 
rockets, small animals, 
rocket launching, birds, fish 
or bike rodeo, be sure you 
are entered by May 30. If you 
didn't get your 4-H 
newsletter, contact your 
leader for more information. 

Cub Scout Pack 80 had 
three boys representing 
them at the district's 
Pinewood Derby held April 
18 at Round Lake High 
School. The boys who 
qualified at the local 
Pinewood Derby were 



dinner tickets. There, will be 
a bike .rodeo sponsored: by 
the pack on Tuesday, May 20 
at Grass Lake School 
parking lot at 6:30 p.m. This 
event is for all Scouts and for 
those new Scouts coming up, 
or those who are interested 
in being Scouts. There will 
be safety checks of the bikes 
and a course of obstacles to 
overcome. Be sure to mark 
your calendar. 

Congratulatins to Ms. 
Glessnor, math coach and 
her math team, David 
Clausson, Cathy Cramer, 
Mark Cole, Jenny Harris and 
Ken Mattson. They com- 
peted last week at Antioch 
Community High School and 
received fifth place. From 
all indications, the scores 
were realy close.. Ms. 
Glessner deserves a round of 
applause for the extra time 
devoted to these kids for this 
project. The team met twice 
a week before. school to get 
ready for this competition. - 
Congratulations to you all on 
a job well done. 

I was going to keep my 
own birthday quiet, but 
Annie Mae had to spill the 
beans" in her column last 
week. A special thank you to ■ 
everyone for making it a 
night to remember.' That is, 
if my memory doesn't start 



eligible to participate . to fail me after 40. 



Remember 

your news! 



to- call with 



Congratulations to Brad 
Priller, Richie Castillo and 

Delivery -Complaint 

If you are not receiving your local newspaper regularly or 
have any other problems with delivery, call (312) 223-8161- 



7^ 



I Bom Loft North 
trcwl ocjcncy 



THANK YOU 
ANTIOCH 

Thanks to your support, we are expanding our An- 
tioch office. We have just installed a new airline 
computer system to serve you faster and more ac- 
curately. We can now do your reservations, seat 
assignments and boarding passes all in one fast 
transaction. We are looking forward to expanding 

with you in the future. _ „-. >- 

IheSfan of 

Bom Loft NorHi Travel 
m tout* 173, Antioch, Wnola MOOS • (119 39540M 




r* 




Come Worship Wit 

A Directory of Antioch Area Churches 



Faith Iwengelicel Lutheran, 1775 Main St., 
Phone {312} 395-1660. Saturday Worship at 7.00 
p.m. Sunday Worship 8:00 ft 10:30 a.m. Sunday 
School 9:25 a.m. Rev Oarald Gruen, Rev. 
Gregory Herrnanton, Pastors. Christian Day 
School. (3)2) 395-1664. 

MUllburn Congregational United Church 
of Christ, Grass Lake Rd. at Rte. 45. Phone 
(312) 356-5237. Sundoy service 10:00 a.m. 
Children's program 10:00 a.m. Rev. Donald 
McPeek, Pastor. 

United Methodist Church of Antioch, 848 

Main St. Phone (312) 395-1259. Sunday Ser- 
vices 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. followed by 
fellowship coffee, Sunday School 9:15 a.m. 
Rev. Stephen W. Williams, Pastor. 

St. Peter's Church,' 557 W. Lake Ave., An- 
tioch. Phone (312) 395-0274. Masses 
-weekdays, 7:15. & 8:00 a.m. Sunday 6:30, 
6:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 
5:30 p.m. Pastor. Rev. Father Lawrence 
Honley. 

Chain Of Lake* Community Bible Church, 
V.F.W. Building; North Ave. Phone (312) 395- 
4248. Sunday Services 9:30 a.m. -6:00 p.m., 



Nursery provided; Children's Church during 
morning worship. Interim pastor, Jim Gwtnn. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist ft Hooding 
tin., Rte. 173 and Harding, Antioch. Phone 
(312)395-1196. Sunday School. Sunday Church 
Service 1 1 :00 a.m. Wednesday 8:00 p.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church, 554 Parkway. 
Phone (312) 395-3393. Sunday School,- 10 a.m. 
Sunday Worship 1 1 :00 a.m. and 6 p.m. Pastor, 
Rev. Heyward Knight. 

St. Ignatius Episcopal, 963 Main St. Phone 
(312) 395-0652. Services 7:30 a.m. Low Moss, 
9:30 a.m. High Mass, Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 
Rev. Vincent Eckholm, 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church, Tiffany 
Rd. Phone (312) 395-4117. Sundoy School 9:00 
a.m.; Sunday 'Worship, I0;tS a.m. and 6:00 
p.m.: Nursery • Children's Church during 
morning worship; Awano Club, 6:30 p.m., 
Wednesday. * 

St. Stephen Lutheran Church, Hillsdale 8 
Rte. 59. Phone (312) 395-3359. Sunday Wor- 
ship, 8:00. & 10:30 a.m. Church School 9:15 
a.m., Sunday. Rev. Charles E. Miller, Pastor, 




Dan Dugmnako, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 






12A Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday May 15, 196c; 



^f^W« 



^ 



E-f/L .-, 



■ ii 111 •iii 1 "-ir-rj ■ mi hi in minimi mil 1 1 



. - . .■..-•! . ■'.' -■ 



5w*ft*atetffl3>HSiv»t»-w»ei* 



!ff«r«a3^5«ia*S=Uf>««SKf!V'! 



&Ae 

On Rte. 173, 1 Block West of 59, Antioch. III. 



Appearing 

Cimarron - May 1 6 & 1 7 

Spanker - May 23, 24 & 25 

Country And Wmtern Night 

W«dn«td«yMay21 With 

4 Whttl Drl v* 

Ladles Night 

Thursday May 22 

•2 Cover For Tha Ladlaa - FREE 

Drinks O-Mldnlta Pro D J 

Mtct cotiff tenons 

Dally Luncheon Buffet Mon. thru Sat. 
with Salad Bar *3'° 
Sunday Brunch From 11 a.m. M* 9 
Friday Night 
Fish & Shrimp Fry »5« 
i Full Menu Available Every Night 
Banquet, Wedding and Graduation Ac- 
commodations Available 
Call For Information a Reservations 
<312J. 395-4211 




Town Pump 

31726 Rt. 12, Volo .- . , 

(Rts. 12 & 120) .' //i 

(815)344-1690 

Daily Lunch Specials 

Served 11 a.m. -2p.m. 

Niriir - Vnl Citlit I Haiku* Maim I 

Vif ttaMi . . ; S2.«o 

TiiKay • Hit It tf Snd iic V lisiirf Foist on I 

Vtiitabw..... ;»3.50 

WaiMtur • Ofctoi, Frits I Sl» **** 

TurtUf • 21 SfcriMi, Mala Sticks 1 Sl» $3.75 

Frifij - ill f« Cn Eat Parch Ir Cad $4.75 

Cna Uft, Sup t Salal lir $11.95 

Salad Bar Available <a%05 

All You Can Eat ^ajM 

Plui Soup ^kw 

Friday 5-10 p.m. ^ _ _ Ae 

All You Can Eat )1 1 9£f 

Crab Legs. Soup I I 

& Salad Bar " m 

Saturday - Full 
Slab B.B.Q. Ribs (HQE 
& Soup & Salad ▼K^^ 

Bar & Potato %0 

Served 5-10 

Beginning 5-21 we'll be serving A _ AC 
atl you can eat Spaghetti, Garlic ^ |S IF 9 
Bread & Soup & Salad Bar ^f 

Served 5-10 p.m. - 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily 1 1 a.m. • 10 p.m. 

Separate Dining Area 



THE 





CHALET 



Located between Grand 

Ave. & Rollins Rd. on 

Washington St. In Ingleslde 

(Fox lake) 

(312) 587-7933 

Spring Is Here 

Th*8i*ck B—riapnpmring form bu§r*umnw—Mon.Our 
AWfif otftn » tliw varhty of American I Qirman cuisin: 

House Specialties Spring Special 

• Plotter for two , !•..- - 

tt Roast Duckling, 1 slab of teuraw eft 01 prime 

B.B.Q. backribs. 2 wiener rib Of MM With all the 
schnitzels, Red cabbage, trimmings for only 

vegetables & dumplings (TJv. $9.95 

Wiener schnitzels, Beef 
rouladen & bratwurst 





We also feature: 

Ka« York Strip Steak, Filet Mignon, Chateaubriand, 

B.B.Q. aiekribt la large selection of eicellerit 

teafoodi, Wkela dovar tola, Orange roughy, Walleyed 

pike, Ratafee* trout. 

Friday also brings in addition to the above, Lake Perch & A Fish Fry. 



B 



Ruling Appealed 



4> 



Anticipated ground- 
breaking this fall of a new 
tertiary care, high tech 
hospital in North Chicago 
has been delayed at least 60 
days by an appeal of the 
decision of the state agency 
voting a certificate of need. 

The appeal process was 
set in motion by 12 to 11 vote 
of the Kane-Lake-McHenry 
Health Services Agency. 



CON requested by Chicago 
Medical School which is 
planning the new facility in 
conjunction with Humana 
Inc., of Louisville, Ky. 

Jack Taft of St. Charles, 
chairman of the HSA group, 
broke a tie vote. 

The appeal process 
provides for a 30-day filing 
deadline and 30 day period in 
which to conduct a hearing. 



The regional HSA took CMS officials had hoped to 

issue with a 7 to 2 decision by break ground by Oct. 1. They 

the Illinois Health Facilities said they anticipated the 

Planning Board to allow the HSA appeal. 



Dining Guide 

The good eating spots, 
whether you're in a hurry, 
seeking family dining or out 
for gourmet food for that 
"special occasion," are 
featured weekly in Lakeland. 
Newspapers. 



Wonder Bar 
Midwest Polka Show 

May 18 

4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 

Doors Open At 3 p.m. 

Public Invited 



Our Famous 
Airport Mix 



r«* W^L 



Sunny- 
Shady- 



$1.40 $1.25 
$1.30 $1.45 



or Custom Mixed 
to meet your 
requirements 



Uiing Kenty NO-31. Per- 
ennial Rye, Deeping Rett 
Fnf m, Perk • Kenty Blut. 



Fertilizer 

10-10-10 S4.'50 • 50# 

Lime 

90-10 SI. 65 • S0# 



\ 



TREVOR FEED CO. 

HOURS: 
7:30-4:30 Mon.-Frl. ■ 

7:30-Noon Sot. 

Trevor. Wit. 
Turn North ot Trocks 

(414) 162-2616 





I 



TOUGH NEW 1000 SERIES DIESELS 
UNDER 30 HORSEPOWER 

Whether you want to mow an acre or a hundred ... dig a posthole or a 
sewer trench . . . grade a driveway, plow a field or load a truck . . . weVe 
got a Ford 1000 Series tractor for the job! 

These new compacts come with a combination of features you can't 
get anywhere else. Smooth, efficient diesel engines. Standard 10 or 
12-speed transmissions. Hydrostatic and Synchro Manual Shuttle 
transmission options. Standard 540 rpm PTO and Category I three- 
point hitch. DifMock. Optional front-wheel drive. And a choice of more 
than 50 matching implements and attachments. 

So stop in soon and see the new 1000 Series tractors. There's one 
just right lor you! 

Special Ford Financing 7%% Fixed Rate 



Interstate Farm Equipment, Inc. 

U.S. Rt. 45, 1 Mllo North Of Highway 50 

(414)857-7971 



Tractors 
Equipment 



nn 




9.J-- 






Completion 
Scheduled 
for Aug. "86 

NOW LEASING 

at $7.00 per square foot 

Call 

JACK STROM 

President 

RICHMOND BANK 

10910 MAIN STREET 
RICHMOND, ILLINOIS 60071 

(815)678-2461 



RI £HMOI\D CREA TE YOUR 

BANK OWN WORKPLACE 



PLAZA 



• Begin with a brick building of superior 
construction.. .soundproofed and fire 
resistant, of course! 

• Enhanced by an attractive landscaped 
courtyard. 



• Design and size your space according 
to your needs... 

from 1,200 to 4,200 square feet 



Thursday May 1 5, 1966* 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 3A 



■ 



-7 NA. 



-~~. 







T Tr,*i« f J <i 'nr .t ', -- rn — i.-t— -Tr'-i 1 -^ >.r — i-^ 1 '* -,7- J /»~tf*i-t*-f , "» 



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^ WJ j«tUB«^tiaJ«w'v«5'*M<"*~^^ 



■ 









BANKING 




is a 








r-a- 
iness 

It's our. pleasure to serve you when 
you're in the bank - let us help you 
save time too... 

Everyday personal banking 
is always fast and easy with 

CflJH JTflTIOn 

You can • Withdraw cash 

• Make deposits 

• Transfer money 

• Make payments 




CASH STATION, INC., is an organization 
of many Illinois financial institutions 
sharing a network of automatic teller 
machines. 



at over 200 automatic teller locations and 178 Jewel Foodstores including our Lobby Foyer and 
Drive-Up machines at 440 Lake Street, 24 hours a day, and a free-standing unit at 845 E. Rollins 
Road, Round Lake, during Walgreen's business hours. 

RECORDS CURRENTLY INDICATE A* TOTAL OF MORE THAN 10,000 CASH STATION TRANSACTIONS 
PER MONTH AT OUR ANTIOCH AND ROUND LAKE LOCATIONS, AND THAT TELLS US. . . 



ill 



1 . Our Customers are avoiding long teller lines by using CASH STATION during 
bank business hours. 

2. Our customers find the Cash Withdrawal Service through CASH STATION a very 
attractive feature . . Day or Night . . Weekends or Holidays, at any CASH 
STATION location. 

3. Customers at other financial institutions in Illinois are enjoying the convenience 
of our CASH STATION facilities when working or traveling Northern Illinois or 
Southern Wisconsin. 

4. Our customers will be using their CASH STATION cards on Monday, May 26 
when all other facilities of the State Bank will be closed in celebration of 
Memorial Day. 

CASH STATION IS MOT ONLY FAST Sc EASY ■ IT'S FREE! 

Let us show you how CASH STATION works — 
ash for a quick personal demonstration today! 



440 Lake Street 
Phone (312) 395-2700 





1 4 A Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday May 15, 1986 



J r« — - ~ - 



— ■*«%**■■ *irfjt. -»_■<►* 



-■» a w "j « 



V: 




In f/i is Section 



Lakelog TV Guide 
Letters to Editor 
Editorial Page 
Obituary 
Travel 



Business/Real Estate 

Engagements 

Weddings 

Sports 

Legal Notices 



i ;1 



Sheriff, Navy Score 'First' 

Lake County Sheriff : Robert H. Babcox welcomes Capt. Barbara J. Suse, com- 
manding officer, Noval Training Station, Great Lakes, to the Lake County I SEARCH 
network. A "Cooperative Agreement" was signed between sheriff's police and the 
U.S. Navy lo assist each other addressing the issues of missing children. The' event 
marked the first time in the state that a naval installation linked up with an I SEAR- 
CH law enforcement agency. 

Co/Jectors Awaiting 
World Fair Of Stamps 



Kotlarz On Ballot 

The Democratic party has Mike Simon, for the purpose 
announced the candidacy of of slating a county board 



Mitch Kotlarz for the 
position of Lake County 
Board member for Dist. 4. 

Kotlarz is presently a Lake 
Villa Twp. trustee, member 
of the Lindenhurst Planning 
Commission, current board 



candidate for the general 
election in November. 

'Different Walks' 

Although the nation's 50 
million working women 
represent 44 percent of the 



member of the local Jaycee total labor f° rce . in 1984 ^ey 
chapter, and is active in accounted for 16 percent of 



One of the oldest and most 
popular hobbies in the 
Lakeland area and .the 
nation— stamp collec- 
ting—will be in the spotlight 
atAMERIPEX. 

This is the world's fair of 
stamps, the first such event 
held in the United States 
since 1976 scheduled from 10 
a.m. to6 p.m. daily May 22 to 
June 1 at O'Hare Expo. 

AMERIPEX is officially 
designated at a world's fair 
by the U.S. Dept. of Com- 
merce and is sanctioned by 
the- Federation In- 
ternationale de -PhiiateHe 
(FIP). 

A Lake County resident is 
on the committee planning 
the even expected to attract 
150,000. persons. He is 
Stephen Neulander of 
Ocerficld. 

Neulander is a skilled hot 
air balloonist whose stamp 
collecting activities relate to 
balloon stamps and mail- 
carrying balloon flights. 

All Rosemont hotels have 
been almost completely 
booked for the period or 
AMERIPEX. It is the 
largest booking for a single 
event in the history of- the 
Hyatt Regency O'Hare 
Hotel. 

AMERIPEX will have on 
exhibit some of the world's 
finest stamp collections 
from approximately 40 
countries. There will be 4,000 
"frames", each holding 16 
pages of material, for a total 
or 64,000 individual pages of 
display material. It is 
estimated that if an in- 
dividual wanted to look at 
every page, approximately 5 
seconds could be spent at 
each page and the visitor 
would have walked 3.2 miles. 



Queen Elizabeth of Great 
Britain is sending material 
from the Royal Collection in 
the. personal care of the 
Keeper of the Royal 
Collection. 

Prince, Rainer, of Monaco 
is sending special items 
from his collection for 
exhibit as well. 

The rarest, most ex- 
pensive stamp in the world, 
the famous British Guiana 
stamp, that sold for $935,000, 
will be exhibited. 

The postal administrations 
of 128 countries will be of- 
ficially represented at the 
show, making it a truly 
World's Fair "Of Stamps. 
Each country will sell their 
postage stamps and other 
philatelic material at face 
value. 

• U.S. . Postal Service will 
occupy approximately 90,000 
square feet, including 
special exhibits on the 
history of the posts in the 
United States, which will 
include early postal 
vehicles. These exhibits and 
a 34 projector multimedia 
presentation are being 
produced by the "same 
organization that designed 
and built many of the 
exhibits in Disney's Epcot 
Center. 

A special section of 
AMERIPEX andpart of the 
post .office exhibit will be 
devoted to special activities 
"for children. Not only is 
anyone below the age of 18* 
admitted free, but there will 
be special kits of stamps and 
literature on stamp 
collecting given to 
youngsters. 

Approximately 100 in- 
ternational or national 
stamp organizations will 



SLAVIC FOLK FESTIVAL 

Sunday, May 18, 1986 

2 p.m. 

2401 69th St. 

Kenosha, Wl 

7 Slavic dance groups and one band 
representing the countries ot Croatia, 
Carpatho-Russian; Czechoslovakia, Hungary, 
Poland, Russia, Slovenia and the Ukraine 
Join us for 2 hours of the most colorful and 'ex- 
citing dances of Eastern Europe. 
Advance tickets $4.00 until May 1 7. $5.00 at the door. 

Phone (414) 877-2665 

Sponsored by St. Irene Byzantine Church 

Bristol, Wl 



hold their annual 
and conduct 



meetings 
special 



programs atAMERIPEX. 



many community 

organizations and projects. 

All Democratic com- 
mitteemen of Antioch, Avon, 
Grant and Lake Villa Twps; 
were invited to attend a May 
14 meeting called by 
Democratic County Board 
Dist. 4 committee chairman, 



all physicians and lawyers 
and six percent of engineers, 
five percent of machinists, 
three percent of mechanics 
and repairers, and one per- 
cent of plumbers, according 
to. "Meeting the Challenges 
of the 80's," a publication of 
the Women's Bureau of the 
U.S. Dept. of Labor. 




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Mitch Kotlarz 







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First National Bank. of McHenry offers a discount 
brokerage service that can save you a substantial 
amount of money each time you buy and sell 
stock. Our brokerage service is designed for 
investors who know what they want.. .and don't 
want to pay for what they already know. 

Discover how to beat the high cost of investment, 
just call 385-5400. 




• Member FDIC 




FIRST NATIONAL &ANR OF MCHENRY 

3814 W. Elm St., McHenry, IL * 815-385-5400 



* ' '.' ' i 



Thursday May 15, 1966 



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Editor's Vi 



■ 



& Antioch News-Reporter 
t^ Bi-State Reporter 
■fr Fox Lake Press 
ilr. Gray slake Times 



■& Gurnee Press 
tS Lake Villa Record 
-ft- Mundelein News 



>'& North Chicago Tribune 
■ft. Round Lake* News 
■ft Warren-Newport Press 
ftr Wauconda Leader 



HAROLD R. KIRGHHARDT 
President 



WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 
Publisher 



sasssiamsBgssaBim 



Getting Rid Of The Drunks 



Stiffer penalties and speedier justice in 
dealing with driving under the influence 
arrests, as mandated by the Illinois General . 
Assembly, sent put impact ripples in all 
directions. Implementation of legal and 
procedural changes haven't been viewed 
with unbridled enthusiasm, but in the end our 
highways will be safer. 

Members of the Lake County Board have 
been jockeying finances around to provide 
manpower and equipment to fund increased 
costs in processing and prosecuting DUI 
cases. Circuit Court Clerk Sally Coffelt has 
requested the hiring of 15 persons to handle 
increased paperwork. Approval is being 
sought for three additional associate circuit 
court judges, two for Lake County and one 
for McHenry County, partly to handle the in- 
creasing number of DUI cases. 

Right now some local police chiefs are 
grumbling about a directive from Chief Cir- 
cuit Court Judge William D. Block creating a > 
DUI court in Waukegan. Judge Block's cen- 
tralization of the DUI judicial process stems 
from the need to streamline administration 
and iron out glitches in the present system 
that sometimes reach what , he termed 
"nightmarish" conditions because so much 
of the DUI case load now originates in the 
branch courts scattered about the county. 



Coffelt reported that she. paid out $40,000 'in 
overtime in the traffic section of her office in 
the first three months of the year, part of it 
due to changes in the DUI statutes that went 
into effect Jan. l. 

Some County Board members believe that 
state legislators should provide for 
assessment of higher court costs to offset 
new financial burdens being placed on the 
system. Hopefully, efficiencies resulting 
from the new single purpose court will offset 
increased costs. 

Without a doubt, municipalities are going 
, to experience pinched police budgets to 
provide for increased travel and overtime 
costs associated with police officers 
testifying in Waukegan. Judge Block expects 
the new DUI court to be operational 
sometime in July or August. 

There is an interesting sidelight to the 
legitimate concern about increased costs 
associated with administration of stiffer DUI 
law enforcement and prosecution. That is the 
fact that the public will respond as expected 
and that less people will be getting behind the 
wheel of a car when they are in no condition 
to drive. There already are indications that 
this, indeed, is happening. The catch is that 
we can't wait for this to happen. The drunks 
have to be taken off the highways now. 



i 

Trying For Equitable Aid 



Illinois needs a predictable, reasonable 
and fair system of funding public schools. 
Republicans in the State Senate have formed 
a special task force with exactly that goal in 
mind. Sen. Minority Whip Jack Schaffer (R- 
McHenry County) has been named to the fact 
finding group and is the; only member 
representing our locality. ■' 

Schaffer is right on target in calling the 
present school aid formula "a patchwork 
document that is inconsistent, unpredictable 
and, very often, illogical." School officials 
are the most vehement critics of the current 
formula, leveling most of the criticism on the 
fact that too much of a burden of funding 
public education is placed on the local real 
estate tax base, which they view as in- 
consistent with the 1970 Constitution. 

One of the problems of funding public 
education in Illinois is that our state is such a 
diverse creature that it is almost impossible 
m devise a single system thai satisl.i-s ihi- - 
needs and is acceptable to the three basic 

Happy Hour 

It's happy hour in Illinois. 

Happy hour is that time just after work 
when bars ply their customers with two-for- 
one drinks and half-price specials. Most 
people know that the purpose of happy hour 
is to bring the customers in and get them 
comfortable enough to stay till closing. 
Those that do usually wind up with a 
hangover the morning after. 

It is odd that first-year allocations of 
"Build Illinois" money became available 
just in time for our two merry bartenders, 
Gov. Jim Thompson and Lt. Gov. George 
Ryan, to travel around the state giving away 
money like two-for-one specials. 

What a promotion it is: almost every 
village in Illinois will get a sip of what sud- 
denly seems to be a bottomless vat of state 
money. Local officials love it. They order up 
a draft of state money and, as a chaser, get 
their picture taken with the governor. 

Thompson assures everyone that there is 
plenty of money to satisfy this thirst and 
much, much more. Four years ago, he said 
the. same thing until after the election was 
over. 

Local officials had better enjoy the state 
drafts and the heady attention they are get- 
ting while they can. On the morning after the 
election, they are likely to find that the bar is 
closed. 



constituencies-Cook County, the suburban 
collar counties and rural downstate. And not 
the least of the problem of legislators is that 
the system must have bi-partisan support. It 
is not infrequent that the politicians are at 
odds with the people. But that's political life 
in Illinois! 

The special fact finding body will be 
operating with the imposing name of the 
Senate Republican School Aid Formula 
Rewrite Task Force. If the game senators 
don't falter under the weight of this title, they 
might come up with something useful. By 
tradition, the Democrats won't offer 
anything of substance, preferring to play the 
role of nay sayers. Last year's - reform 
package was a good beginning, even if only 
illusionary. Overhauling the school aid 
formula might trigger establishment of a 
new look in public education that will 
produce an end product of which citizens can 
be proud at a price they consider fair and 
equitable. 



Fi nd iha Lost Tots 
A Cinch With New 
Iron-On Labels 



by BILL SCHROEDER 

A former Lake County. resident who spent 
her childhood in the Gages Lake-Wildwood 
area and Waukegan is earning a national 
reputation for helping lost children find their 
parents. 

Lauri A. Johnson and her husband, Rom, 
have developed permanent, iron-on . iden- 
tification labels for children's clothing. The. 
labels are made of a durable fabric with in- 
delible ink that will withstand countless laiin- 
derings. 

The former Lauri Piatt and her husband, 
both involved in personal product sales, got 
the idea for "Child Keep" and "Identifind" 
labels while trying to look after a four-year- 
old grandson with an advanced case of wan- 
derlust. "We knew we couldn't tattoo him," 
laughed the California resident, "so we 
worked on coming up with something that 
would enable children to be returned to their 
parents." 

As it has worked out, the patches also are 
invaluable for identifying elderly and men- 
tally retarded people. 

The labels can be ordered in packs of 24 for 
$5.50 or 36 for $8 by writing Mrs. Johnson, c'/o 
Child Keep, P. O. Box 297, Vista, Calif. 92083, 
plus 52 cents for mailing. Since making 
money on the idea isn't the goal of the John- 
sons, they have a standing offer to donate an 
order to anyone who can't afford the labels if 
they send a stamped, self-addressed en- 
velope with necessary information. 

The Johnsons report the Indentifind labels 
are vital because in the three to seven age 
group, 68 percent don't know their home ad- 
dress; 86 percent don't know how to reach 
their mother during the day, 96 percent can't 
call their fathers at work and 75 percent of 
children questioned didn't know the" phone 
number of ah adult to call when their parents 
couldn't be reached. 

So when little ones are lost, they're really 
lost. But not if the Johnsons can help it. 




CATCHY; SLOGAN-Credit Charles A. 
"Chuck" Werthi Democratic candidate for 
sheriff of McHenry County, 'with coming up 
with the catchiest slogan of the 1986 election. 
"Chuck's Werm It' J ^ will be embkzoried on 
signs, buttons, literature, etc. 

Werth is riot a philosophic Democrat and at 
one time was considered on the inside track 
for the Republican nomination" until- party 
moguls turned him aside. "I'm basically a 
cop so it was easy to switch parties," com- 
mented Werth, who is police chief of Prairie 
Grove, a small community betweenAVaucon- 
da-Island Lake and Crystal Lake. He ran 
unopposed.in the primary. Werth has been 
involved in .law enforcement at various 
levels for 14 years. 

•••••*• 



*••••** 

NEW FLAG— Lakeland Newspapers is 
indebted to Congressman Phil Crane for 
presentation of a new American flag. We're 
honored to have a flag which was flown over 
the Capitol on Flag Day in 1984. The flag will 
be flown with honor and appreciation. Thank 
you Congressman Crane. 



••••••• 

COMMENDABLE— Cmdr. Larry Muckey 
and members of Lake Villa Post 4308 VFW 
are to be commended for their flag presen- 
tation project. Every month the post selects 
a worthy recipient of an American flag. 
Recipients can be from all walks of life, 
business or civic organizations. That means 
there are 12 more flags flying every year. 
Our congratulations! 



NEIGHBORLINESS-Communities surro- 
unding the huge central Lake County landfill 
.operated on Rte. 83 by ARF Landfill Corp. 
are being invited to dispose of one dumpster 
gratis as part of. spring clean up. ARF 
management extended the offer to 
Grayslake, Mundelein, Libertyville, the 
Round Lake area and Gurnee. 

*••*••• 

POLITICAL MOVE-Political observers 
are watching closely for any signs of 
organization of a Republicans for Hess 
movement as has been predicted. The theory 
is that sufficient GOP loyalists are disen- 
chanted with party leadership and the county 
clerk candidate to be induced to crossover 
and vote for incumbent County. Clerk Linda 
Hess, a Democrat, in the November election. 

Sander Stagman, Democratic nominee for 
sheriff, flatly has stated that such- a 
movement will develop. Stagman says he 
will be telling Republicans how to vote a split 
ticket to exploit GOP unhappiness. 
Republicans for Hess is one possibility to 
keep an eye on. " 

••••••• 

OOPS— In a commentary in this column, 
the last name of Dan Spann was misspelled. 
Our apologies.- 

*•••••• 

ONE MAN'S FAMILY-Oldestson Bill and 
his future bride, Lisa are heading into the 
home stretch for their trip to the altar. 
Showers and a bachelor party are behind 
them. Now it's finalizing all the details for 
the big day May 30. His family and friends 
will be transporting themselves to Lisa's 
hometown, Moline, for the memorable day. 
Previous business trips and vacation pass 
throughs to the Quad Cities have faded into 
the past, but this is one trip we won't ever 
forget. ." 



SO, YOU TH0U6HT 

THE PRESIDENTS 

CHECKBOOK CONTAINED 
A LOT OF ZEROES ? 





■Not when compared to.. 




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Michelle Dobemecker 
ond Jay Rldlen 



Dobernecker-Rldlen 

Mr. and Mrs. Mason L. Ridlen, Round 
Lake Beach, announce the engagement of 
their son, Jay, to Michelle' Dobemecker, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chet Dobemecker 
of Griswold, Iowa. 

A July 26 is wedding is planned. 

The bride-to-be is a 1984 graduate of 
Griswold High School, and is employed by 
the State of Nebraska Juvenile Court. 

The groom-to-be ,is a i981 graduate of 
Round Lake Senior High School, and a 1983 
graduate of Iowa State University. He is em- 
ployed as a farmer in Griswold. 



Gamelih-Horsch 

Dennis and Deanna Gamelin, Salem, an- 
nounce the engagement of their daughter, 
Kelly, to John Horsch, son of Phil and Char 
Horsch, Antioch. 

The ceremony will be performed at St. 
Peter's Church in Antioch on June 6, 1987. 

The bride-to-be is a 1982 graduate of 
Central High School in Paddock Lake. She is 
employed as a supervisor at Housewares in 
the Factory Outlet Centre, Bristol, and also 
as a workshop aid for Kenosha Achievement 
Center, Bristol. 



The .groom-to-be is a 1981 graduate of 
Antioch High School. He is employed as a 
body man at Phil's Auto Body, Antioch, and 
as a fork lift driver for Dean's Foods, 
Sc ha urn burg. 

The couple pla ns to settle in Antioch. 



Wed 



ore 



ings 




of Eric and Sue Ericson, Waukegan, were 
married at 4 p.m., April 11, in a double ring 
ceremony at the Lake County Court House. 

The couple had planned a big wedding for 
Feb. 14, 1987, but decided not to wait, ana 
eloped instead. 

Maid of honor was Sherrie Surrimier, and 
best man was Terry Bennetts. 

After a honeymoon trip to Orlando, Fla., 
the couple is settling in Gurnee. 

The bride attended Round Lake Senior 
High School and is employed by Gandee 
Family Hair Care. 

The groom attended West Campus High 
School in Waukegan. He is employed by Nor- 
th Shore Sanitary Dist. 




Kelly Gamelin and John Horsch 



Eric Nielsen 

and Kathleen Didier 

Didier-Nielsen 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert R. Didier, Prairie 
View, announce the engagement of their 
daughter, Kathleen M., to Eric J. Nielsen, 
Volo, son of Mr. and Mrs. Victor Nielsen, 
Ingleside. 

The ceremony will be performed by the 
Rev. John P. Finnegan of St. Mary of Vernon 
Church, Vernon Hills, on Oct. 25. 

The bride-to-be is a 1976 graduate of 
Carmel High School for Girls, and a 1981 
graduate of Gateway Technical Institute and 
has an associates degree in applied science 
in food service management. She is em- 
ployed as a kitchen manager for North Shore 
Catering in Lake Forest. 

The groom-to-be is a 1974 graduate of 
Grant High School and a 1981 graduate of the 
University of Illinois and has a B.S. degree in 
agriculture of industry. He owns Nielsen's 
(pick-your-own strawberries) Berry Farm in 
Volo. 

The couple plans to settle in Volo. 




PAID ADVERTISEMENT 



Mr. anil Mrs. Bill Davis 

Meranl /Davis 

Debbie Merani, daughter of John and Barb 
Merani, Round Lake, and Bill Davis of Lake 
Villa, son of James and Judy Warner, 
Bristol, were married in March at 
Presbyterian Calvary Church by the Rev. 
Koffoman. 

The bride was given away by her father, 
John Merani during the double-ring, 
ceremony. 

The bride and groom both worked at Pizza 
Place, in Round Lake. They started dating, 
fell in love and married. 

The couple will reside in Round Lake. 

Both the bride and the groom attended. 
Round Lake Senior High School. The bride is 
employed by Kemper Insurance. The groom 
works for Avondale Electric. 

Merani / Bennetts 

Linda Merani, son of John and Barb 
Merani, Round Lake, and Gary Bennetts, son Mr. and Mrs. Gary Bennetts 




Anniversary 



50th Wedding Anniversary 

Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Molidor celebrated 
their 50th wedding anniversary on May 3 at 
the Lindenhurst Civic Center. 

The former Evelyn L. Krause married Ir- 
win R. Molidor on May 6, 1936 in Valparaiso, 
Ind. 

The couple have nine children. They are 
listed with their spouses: 

Bob and Cathy Molidor, Ingleside; Terry 
Molidor, Port Hueneme, Calif.; Jim and Lin- 
da Molidor, Round Lake Beach; Tom and 
Barbara Molidor, McHenry; Marilyn and 
Homer Dahlman, Dubuque, Iowa; Kathy and 
Jim West, Gray slake; Sally and Ralph Ed- 
wards, Round Lake Park; Mary and Chuck 
Beese, Round Lake Beach; and Patti and 
Tom Marx, Lindenhurst. ^ 

there are 29 grandchildren in the family 
and one great-grandchild. "^ 

Irwin is retired from Arnold Pederson Con- 
struction Company and Evelyn is retired 
from Baxter Laboratories. 




Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Molidor 




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Mrs. J.N.S., Ft. Payne, Alabama 
"Losing J lb. per day.*' 

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"Your Dream Pill is working for me . 
. . ordering another supply." 
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The System's Dream Pill com- 
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growth hormone. Dr. Robert Har- 
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explaining: "Growth Hormone may 
be what's responsible for allowing 
teenagers to down thousands of 
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' "Growth Hormone is present in 
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s Copyright 1986. 



1-800-453-4810 



ThundayMay15,19a6 



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Sauce Mokes Great Side Dish 



When it comes to side dishes, I've found 
that pasta takes the cake. Not with tomato 
sauce, however. 

I prefer it with butter and cheese. 

One favorite is in the fetuccine family. 
Tagliatelle is a word derived from the verb 
tagliare-to cut. The widths vary with the 
names all the way down to 1/8 inch- 
tagtiarint. You can purchase them at an 
Italian specialty store. 

Vermicelli is an old friend. It translates 
into "little worms," a very thin spaghetti. 
Like a number of thin pastas, it comes folded 
or in clusters as well as in straight rods. 

I use vermicelli in soups, too. 

I use pasta whenever I can. 

Buttery, Cheesey Tagliatelle 

1 pound tagliatelle 

1/4 pound butter 

1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese 

Liberal amount milled black pepper. 



Pilot 




1/2 pound Ricolta cheese 

Liberal amount milled black pepper 

1/2 tablespoon chopped parsley 

1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese 

Cook vermicelli to desired firmness and 



drain. Place pasta in hot bowl with three 
tablespoons butter. In small skillet, stir 
Ricotta with remaining butter until smooth 
and warm; pour over vermicelli; add pep- 
per, parsley and Parmesan and toss. - 



Marriage Licenses 



GRE6 MEUKOV 



Cook tagliatelle to desired firmness and 
drain. Melt butter and place in hot bowl. Add 
pasta and gently toss with wooden forks or 
spoons. Add half of cheese and pepper; 
gently toss. Add remaining cheese and 
pepper; gently toss. Serve immediately. 
Serves four to sue 

Vermicelli end Ricotta 

1 pound vermicelli 

4 tablespoons butter, melted 



Arthur W. W<v»r and Judith L. 
K'mmtnrt. Woutpodo. 

J««m M. WkiniM, Bound lofc. taoch 
ondVkliiaL.Stoftdar. 

Jama* It, William*. Round lak» and 
Dotmm L. Fyfe, Hound Lofc • Baach. 

Richard R. Amp*. Jr. and Srwrry A. 
! AfcrtgM.Roudn La)i« Pork, 

Chart** W. Bott. Zion and Sandra 0. 
lapp. Antioth. 

Mark A. ftryarl, Graal Lak»* and Angala 
Kay» Holibough, Front lin. 

Jatfray 0. Clouting. Wowfcogan and 
Mich»W E. Bond. Mundalafci. 

Richard J. fog* and Sharon I. Shirk. 
UndWnhunt. 

Armando Atdona, Round look and 
Ro*amory Hrmondoz. I rb*n y vilt* . 

William E. Millar. Rolling Moodowt ond 
loura A. Ott li i ina, Antioch, 



Konnolh' A. Stoimkl, Loko Villa and 
Mary K. Charlo*. Waukagon. 

Romuoldo A. Coillkn. Woukagon ond 
Moria E. Sanchat. Round Loka Baocti. 

Gory K. Cw'ng ond Miff I A. Coo oil. 
Antioch, 

Scott R. Naltort, Round Loko Booch, and 
' CothorinaP. Nixon. Loka Vflta. 

Mark D. Wihon and Marks Wank, Round 
loka Booth. 

Marvin I. Forrall ond Margonri J . Honna ; 
hgUiido. 

Jam** R. Haako. lindonhurtt, and 
florvnc* A. Rootmon, loko VMo, 

Roban C. H*i**r, Woukogon. and 
Joanne M. ClambotU, Gomaa. 

Mkhoal J. Schautrow ond Donna A. 
Kaminikl. Waucortdo. 

RotMKt W. Toporok. Ctvfthkm. and 
Polly J. Fallon, Borr in gton. 



ond Joanna 



RudoM ' C. Rmborgar 
Ma**lrto. Inghtida. 

Sanort A. Kkld and Man/ S. n*rgu»on. 
Round Loka Booth, 

Sonlot Rodrloua n and Maria L. Gomai. 
Round Loko Booth. 

John A. ShankUn. Ctaojt lokoa. and 
JocauaWMi C. CoRohon . Groytiok*. . 

JoMph P. Wornof ond Sown L. Rorrigon. 
Mundaktki. 

Chorkn R. Will- end Mary A. Man, 
Groytloka, 

Gaorga B. Booltkf, Jr.. Ctanvkt*. ond 
Joyco T. MOIor. Antioch, 

Kurt L. FbchkM-, I Bj ort yi Ba. and Dobra 
L. Gaoian, Munrlakjin, 

Richard A. FotMr and Chrtatino A. 
Uoart.tnghl l a*. 

Robort Gavronan. Fen Loka. and Lilian 
Rood, Round loka Booth, 

Tnomo. M. GmU and tori I. Nohlochok. 
Antioch. 



Easy Ways To Help Your New Pei Adjust 



by CHARLENE WHITNEY 

It's a big step when you get 
a new pet. Whether the new 
member of the family is a 
puppy or a kitten, there are 



should be introduced to other 
pets and to visitors. A pet 
that is raised in isolation ten- 
ds to become a one-person 
animal. He may be 



still many adjustments for frightened of any changes 



everyone. 

Housebreaking is the fust 
thing that everyone wants 
out of the way. Set the tone 
with your pet from the start 
and follow through. 

Schedule several times 
during the day, such as the 
morning, after meals, before 
and after play and when 
your pet first wakes up from 
a nap. At those times, take 
the kitten to his litter pan or 
the puppy for a walk out- 
doors. I would not recom- 
mend using paper training. 
Keep in mind that cats will 
only use a clean litter box 
which is free of bad smells. 

Praise your pet when he 
relieves himself in the right 
place. Positive rein- 
forcement is essential. 
Should he become frightened 
by you because of a mistake, 
he will wait to repeat it while 
you're gone. He may find a 
secret place to relieve him- 
self. 

Help your pet learn where 
his "spot" is with lots of 
praise for doing it right. 
Don't make him wait until he 
can't help it, either. In a 
month or two, your pet 
should be completely 
housebroken. 

A new pet needs time to 
get used to his family. He 



It's best if you lead as nor- 
mal a life as possible so your 
pet will become comfortable 
with the household ac- 
tivities. Do allow him some 
rest time of his own. It is 
possible to handle a new pet 
too much. 

Don't get too fancy with 
his food. He may become 
finicky. 



Pet- 
Wise 



The best thing for him Is a 
respected brand name food 
that is formulated just for 
puppies or just for kittens. 
His stomach is small and he 
will need to eat three or four 
times a day. 

Barking, meowing, or 
whining can mean he needs 
to eat or go out. It can also 
mean fear- or loneliness. 
Sometimes, an animal will 
find noise can be an attention 
getter. Should this be the 
case, firmly tell him to stop 
and slap your hand on the 
wall or door. However, first 
check out the other 
possibilities. A clock or even 
the sound of a radio, set to a 
talk show, will often comfort 
your pet while you are away. 



It is good for your pet to 
learn some obedience 
training. Buy your puppy or 
kitten a lightweight collar 
and leash. On short walks, 
teach him to walk quietly at 
your side, without pulling. 

Set aside 15 minutes each 



day to work with your pet. 
Praise him for his progress 
and reward him with a treat 
reserved just for that. In 
about six months, your pet 
should be 95 percent trained 
in obedience. 

For more training, there 
are some very good obedien- 



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+■■■ ■ - "" *■' ■■ .-''.'■'. '■■' - '■■'■■'■' >'--■ 



^y«v*« 



-•■-.-■■"■':..' 



Is An Official In Warranty^ 




■ . ■ ■■ 



',x>: 






imm?~tsr. 



We Carry Complete Line 
Of Watch Batteries - Installed F*E8 



BRANDT'S 



34 N. G»f>«»* 
Downtown Wauk*gan 

(312) 244-4454 



>o« 



CONE 



• All Breeds 

• Flea 
Dipping 




-4jy 

• Clipping 

• Hand 
Scissoring 

• Low Rates 



* MOVED * 

Our New Location Is 



SCIENCE 039 W. Rollins Rd. 

DIET, Round Lake Booch, Illinois 

^ ===sr ~ (312) 546-O90O 





ORPHANS OF THE 
STORM 

Adopt A Pet - Save A Life" 
Always 250 dogs, 50 cats 

Pure and mixed for approved homes. 
At nominal fees. 

Visit 1-5 (7 days) 

2200 Riverwoods Rood West of Deerf ield 



d** c %, 

rtp Bristol 0ak§ 
Country Club Ltd. 

1 8 Hole Championship Golf Course 

•Reasonable Greens Fees 

•Reserved Tee Times 

•Golf Outings — Our Specialty 

• Watered Fairways 

•Restaurant And Bar 

•Banquet Facilities- 
weddings - Private Parties -Business Meetings 
Seating Up To 350 People 

•Pro Shop 

•Driving Range 

•Country Club Atmosphere 

For Reservations Call (41 4) 857-2302 

Located Vk Miles West Of I-94 On Hwy. 50 
Bristol, Wisconsin 





ce schools. Ask your 
veterinarian about them. 

I believe that all dogs, 
pups, cats and kittens should 
be introduced to car rides on 
a pleasant basis. Sooner or 
later, it will be necessary for 
them to get in the car. There 
are visits to the 



veterinarian, unexpected 
trips, moves to be made, etc. 
A pet that is frightened of a 
car can complicate things 
for everyone. 

A new pet has much to 
learn, but with your help and 
understanding, he'll be the 
best pet for years to come. 



Hg 



ENTER CREATIONS! ' 




Uke County Area Vocsttead tarter 
BEAUTY SCHOOL 

(Adjacent to the College of Loko County) 

CutV^Shampoos • Permanents 

Tints • Manicures & Facials 
Ail Work Done Exclusively By Students 
Under The Supervision Of Instructors 



May Sp m c iar 

$20 . 00 PiKmontrt t 




frkhyphty 




8:30-4:30 Sat. 8:0 0-3:00 
■■■■■■■■■■ 







Get our NEW car rate 

on a loan for a 1984 or 
1985 used car. 

10Vi% A.P.R. up to 30 months 








v^ 



Main Bank 

500 E. Grand 
Lake Villa, IL 

(312)356-2181 




Lindenhurst 
Facility 

1906 E.Grand 
Lindenhurst, IL 

(312)356-2181 



first American Bank 
of Lake County 












48 Lakeland Hewipapeti 



Thursday May 15, 1986 



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at's 
Happening . . , 




Gem And Mineral Group Meets 

The May general meeting of the Lake County Gem and 
Mineral Society will be held Tuesday, May 20, 7:30 p.m. at 
the Waukegan Public Library auditorium,,129 N. County St., 
in Waukegan. Guest speaker, Kevin Ponzio, of the Kenosha 
Gem and Mineral Society will demonstrate how to make 
arrowheads, and will display those he has made. Guests are 
welcome. For more information, cal (312) 623-1967. 

PWP's Set Meeting 

Parents Without Partners of Lake County offers creative 
fun including family and adult activities for single parents 
and their children. All single parents are invited to attend the 
general meeting on Friday, May 23, 8:30 p.m. at the Cabriolet 
in Libertyville (Rtes. 21 and 137). Charge is $2 for members, 
$3 for non-members. 

Homemakers To Meet 

The O'Plaine Unit of the Lake County Homemakers Assn. 
will meet at 9: 30 a.m., Monday, May 19, at the home of Jessie 
Faraone. Marge Keenan will instruct a craft session. Lunch 
will follow. Barbara Dahl, extension advisor, will present the 
lesson, "Getting The Most From Your Meat Dollar." The 
organization is open to all Lake Countians. For further in- 
formation, call (312)223-8627. 

Hold 'Blossom Time* Dance 

The Bouys and Belles Square Dance Club will hold a 
"Blossom Time" square dance Friday, May 16 at Great lakes 
Community Center, Great Lakes, atGreenbay Rd. and Hwy. 
137 (Buckley Rd.). The dance will feature caller. Bob Wilson, 
and round dancing with Al Hallgren. .Round workshop will 
begin at 8 p.m. and dancing, 8:30 to 11. All modern western 
square dancers in the area are invited. 



Astronomy Meeting 

Due to remodeling, the next meeting of the Lake County 
Astronomical. Society will be held at the Cook Memorial 
Library, 413 Milwaukee, in Libertyville on Thursday, May 15 
at? p.m. Pictures will be shown and discussion held about the 
Comet Halley trip to New Mexico. The public is invited, 

Warehouse Sale 

NCJW Fashion Clothes-Out and Council Closet (formerly 
NCJW Thrift Ship) is holding its first annual warehouse sale, 
featuring spring and summer fashions. The sale will be Sun- 
day, May 18, from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the warehouse at 1546 
Old Deerf ield Rd. in Deerfield. Proceeds will support North 
Shore Section's many community service projects which in- 
clude Tele-Help, Tri-Con Day Care Center and Youth Em- 
ployment Services. For more information call the office at 
(312) 498-NCJW. or the Council Closet at (312) 433-6560. 

"Baby," Anyone? 

The Non-Smokers Singles Club can get tickets to the new 
show "Baby," being staged at Marriott Lincolnshire 
Theatre, for $9 each (through a special group rate through 
Loretta. If you want to go, call her at (312) 438-3902, or Nan at 
(312) 223-8544. Must know before May 22; money in by May 
26. 

Homemakers Plan Summer 

The Chain O' Lakes Unit of Lake County Homemakers Ex- 
tension Assn. will meet at 10 a.m., May 27, at Trinity 
Lutheran Church Hall in Long Lake (Ingleside). The unit is 
looking forward to a busy summer, breaking into small 
groups to work on projects for the upcoming Oct. 22 In- 
. ternational Craft Village. New members are welcome. The 
Chain O'Lakes annual unit picnic will be held on June 24 at 
Betty Masciola's Stanton Point home. 



Hold Dance Party 

The Midwest Singles Assn. invites all singles to an open 
dance party at 7 p.m., Sunday, May 25 at the Holiday Inn 
O'Hare Kennedy, 5440 N. River Rd., in Rosemont. Admission 
is $3. For more info, call (312) 271-1200. 

Slate Ice Cream Social 

Square dance with the Lake Promenaders at an Ice Cream 
Social, Saturday, May 17. The featured caller will be Herb 
Oes'terle. The dance will be from 8 to U p.m. at Woodland 
Intermediate School on Gages Lake Rd., between Rte. 45 and 
Hunt Club Rd. Doris and Ted Palmen with rounds. For more 
information call Pat and Steve Billmyer a t (312)356-7887. 



Chandler's, Easter Seals coach 



Sponsor Benefit Runs 



Chandler's Family Fitness Center, Lin- 
denhurst, in conjunction with the Easter 
Seals of Lake County is sponsoring a 10K run 
and a two mile fun run for children and 
adults on Monday, May 26, starting at 9 a.m. 

Participants should sign in at Chandler's 
between 8-8:30 a.m. on the day of the race. 
Start and finish will be at Chandler's in the 
Linden Plaza. 

Registration fees include $6 in advance, $8 
on the day of the race. Registration deadline 
is May 21. 

Age groups for the 6.2 mile run are 0-19, 20- 
24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-59, 50-59 and 60 
plus. Divisions for' the two mile fun run in- 
clude 14-under, 15-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59 
and 60 plus. 

T-Shirts will be awarded to the first 250 
participants who turn in their registration 
forms along with payment. 



"We're looking for support from the entire 
Lake Villa Twp. community. We have a goal 
of approximately 500 participants and we en- 
courage all of them to get as many sponsors 
as they can," Tom Myers, owner of Chan- 
dler's Family Fitness Center said. 

The Libertyville Massage Therapy Clinic 
will be providing six therapists throughout 
the day to aid the participants who have 
muscle fatigue. 

Myers said the Lindenhurst Police Dept. 
will be providing a police escort at the front 
and rear of the race, with the Lindenhurst 
Cadets providing traffic control. 

There will be three or four nurses on duty 
from the Victory Health Outreach Center in 
Lake Villa for emergency situations, he ad- 
ded. 

"If everything goes as planned, we hope to 
make this an annual event," Myers said. 



Homemakers Are On The Go 



The Volo Unit of the Lake 
County Homemakers Assn. 
sponsored Alva Thompson 
and Gerry Henningfield to 
attend the annual conference 
in Urbana. Other ladies at- 
tending were Charlotte 
Bingham, Daisy Bacon, 
Florance Anderson, Dorothy 
Rodewald and Betty Wertke. 

Lake County Homemakers 
Assn. held its 54th annual 
meeting at the Holdiay Inn in 
Gurnee. There were 285 
present, with 27 members 
and three guests being from 
the Volo Unit. 

Ginger Dickson was one of 
the models in the style show. 
Volo is pleased to have Hen- 
ningfield elected to serve on 
the county board serving as 
the citizenship and safely 
chairman for the coming 
year. 

the May meeting of the 
unit will be held at the home 
of Henningfield, May 14, at 
noon. The lesson, "Making 
the Most of Your Meat 
Dollar," will be presented by 
the Lake County Home 
Economics Adviser Barbara 
Dahl. Hostess for the day 
will be Jackie Victor, Mary 



Dianis and Colleen Dorolek. 

Bingham will be installing 
the officers of the unit on 
that day, Bernice Hapke, 2nd 
vice president; Laverne 



Powers, Treasurer; Alice 
Dowell, safety and citizen- 
ship; Dickson, family 
relationships and 'Alva 
Thompson, sunshine. 



To Lecture 

The Medical Center of 
Lake County and its Liberty 
Road and Track Club will 
present a lecture by Olympic 
Coach Joe Newton at 7:30 
p.m., Friday, May 16 in the 
hospital's dining room. ; 

Selected for the U.S.A. 
track team for the 1988 
Olympics in Seoul, Korea, 
Coach Newton will discuss 
"Achieving Success in 
Athletics." 

• Refreshments '; will be 
served following the lecture. 
Condell Memorial Hospital, 
a subsidiary of The Medical 
Center of Lake County, is 
located at 900 Garfield Ave., 
Libertyville. 

Offers Volleyball 

The Graystake Park Dist. 
is still sponsoring co-ed 
volleyball Tuesday evenings 
from 7:30 to 10 p.m. in the 
gym at the Grayslake Junior 
High School located on 
Barron Blvd. Cost is $2.50 for 
the evening. 



The New Midlane Country Club 



Offers... 



Ladies Morning League 

Now Forming For 

9 Hole A.M. 

Only $10.00 Includes Cart 

For Further Information Call Howie Robinson, Golf Director 



(312) 244-1 990 



14565 Yorkhoim- Himti I Wtukworth, IHitioi* 6000.'! 




jp 



( . .v : : ,t; '. ''Wi'^j :'■> : V ' K | 




lf You had to 

entirely rebuild 

ydiirhbme 

tomorrow, 

could you? 

With, State Farm. , 

you cm get [guarantee 

100° 6 coverage on your 

home plus extra contents 

. protection. Call to see : 

f you i qualify 



Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 




Lakeland Newspapera 51 



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Business \ 

You Can Cut Refinance Charges On Your Home 



S* C.UtT.i KETER3 

Sow t£at interest raxes are ^paring axe 
eight-year few,. .luraernus readies of Tie 
Jteyeri BSeportacrassf theCS. haseaskei: 

<& Khw do I escape the en«s of r^inancne 
my home? 

A. Generally,, yon; can save a fe» hundred: 
dollars in :Ule insurance and the credit 
repocxiffyoiErennanee^yulithe^ 

"If the appraised ?auieafyunr home has 
apprecaoed: over the past few years,. it ma? 
he possible ro h orj. ' w enough Ca incfude the 
points and other closing costs in your new 
mortgage." saidQor^a CeccereUL. presHipgr. 
ar'Cenninon StortgsgeCo. in DesrfieJil EL 

However, the IBS has ant rated an whether 
all points thac are rolled into che mortgage 
can be tax deducrabiie for the year that yon 
refinance ff yoir add. the points to the loan 
amnunc you may have to spread not the 
deduction for the points evenly over the fife 
of the mortgage: So, if points an a 3*-year 
loan total £2.100. you may have to deduct 
them ata rafeofXTfl per year for^fl-yeara. 

Q, We have a hole in our aasement leaking 
mud and rain. How can we find a raputaftle 
repair firm? IL G'Conner.. Jfoline. ffl. 

A. Check wsth friends who have had good 
experiences *»ith repair firms. Then: get at 
least three hids to compare ensisv services 
and materials from each firm, 

3iexr, call your local Berser Business; 
Bureau. "White no one: will recommend a 
firm, »e do have records of consumer 
complaints against individual companies. 
We also have reports on finalized governs 
meat actons against companies." sauf 
James Baumhart. with the BBS :n Chicago 

"tf ? on are Ds a raral area., check with, your 
local building inspec^or'softice.'"' 

Q. You recently did an article oc single- 
premium whofe fife annuities. Where can I 
fmd insurance companies offering the 
program? W. Scromderg. Ft. Lauderdafe, 



A. AC tins time there ace only armor 3B 

ClS-hBCthemnTTn^risgriw^gr^nfd^. 

\farrhaf] Sqrris, an.ii isui:.ii u*et5t^>eitwilfa. 
•ELF. Eiirtan gave as the inflowing list at HI 
firms, actively marketing" ■wnpf e-prem iiirn 
wooJeuli 



The Meyers 
Report 




£^3ienuc. f crecaserGiBv£. Me»esfias 
iasfift s ecauw 3fK£ csitsuiranr tc itaicr 
ftnancsJ insnnjrions scwerTrmerr analysts, 
-ea »sraie ^e^acem aret^am rcewscaceni 
tfrrnugnciir The nsnen ;cr !tr&-sasr TS jjcaigi 
Jreaeism-are imrresj:o 3usrnir r^mmeflts anc 
auesiens for seaside use as a ir yryr scr 
rurure csJumns. Wore Gsrj S uewers £■, 
^ssocae5..La£,^l , * huncarCL Oncagc :L 

seem 






Lite of Virginian Firenxaufs Fund;. Kemper 
Iuuexzacs Life-. Jackson. Sattonaf Life-. 
Charter Life fSL Earns?; ELF. Button: 
Connecticut: jfonnnaf Life < a inhsi diary of 
3Jew England Lifevp ExecntxveLife rBeverfy 
E5Hs>- Keystone Provident life; 3Jor- 
thwesfiem. Mutual life. 

Q, Recently r taiked to my bank about 
harrowing money. However, before they 
asked me any particnJars or references, they 
said that my husband wouid have to co-sign. 
We deadest to talk to someone else at the 
bank, but got the same answer, 

I have borrowed money from, this hank for 
more years than, my husband has even lived 
in the area. I had estahfished credit and 
borrowed for more than 111 years before I was 
marned. No«*. because I am married my 
credit vanished. This sounds like 



tfit^'i rnirmtftitr tn nr^ What do yon t&mk3 
Mtiily 3_Sem5eiaer-,Ead_ 

JL. IEwhatyoasay e trnc. it dnessonmf fike 
ifiiKfriTTm?*w" l Yaw showfrtT ransid er sumg 
and. rfrrag pn y t&c hank imn t&e 2Jth castnry 
3s weil as crjurtL Cersiinly^ yon shooM ga to 

3TTrnn»^ Tig TTlr 

Q, E am almost SBL a wmtar wil& amited 
means. EvranttttsuppfementmynTrome My 
homes worth, ahout gajJWI: Owid I buy 2 
'ess expensive home as an utwesfnienr. osmg 
my present home for seenr. ty 1 Efeannr W. , 
EnnthwyiLPau 

A- uTyou have Uvea! nt your home far some 
tfrof; say 15 years or more, ysu prrxafcty 
havesahsiantbaf enmty vs. the hmne If your 
Foan payments have been on tame yon 
pruhacfy csuld ban Jtu< aganstyong tazn^. 

But rememher T the new property that yoa 
voufd buy would have value of its ova. So. 
the equity in your home could be used for a 
down, payment. You cook! actually buy a 
property that is worth more than year 
present home. 

It aiso does not have to be a sjngSe-famiry 
home Any income property that has a good 
cash flow would probably work. 

You sound fike a spunky lady. See your 
attorney and go for it! 

Q I heard something I couldn't hefefve. A 
friend of mine told me that CD interest rales 
(certificates of deposit} usually go no when 
the stock market cs huffish (rising). It seems 
ia me to be just the opposite. Who's right? E. 
Thai. Brooklya. 3Cass. 

A. Neither of you is exactly correct. The 
current cull marfrpf h <r3r^»H na part by 
faffing interest rates, because lovr interest 
rates are good far the emuouij and eor- 
porate profitability. A hefhr e co no m y 
promotes h oc r o wing fa demand for money) 
which raises interest ra tes— sometimes. 

A few years ago the co unt r y was in need of 
investment capital. When interest rates 
started to rise, cash flowed in from overseas 
and the stock market rose. 



ff we had to pick you would be the winner. 

Q. I am m years old, sick 3nd cannot work. 
My wife is AC and semi-invalid. Are we 
e£o£bfe far any disahifity benefit? Jms Eon. 
Merafitn.tf.tt 

A_ 0nfortnnatery, w&~ "DisabUity 
pr ngsamf are primarily' mf ende d for those 
ixndiere years of age, to heip people to get to 
retirement. After 95, yoor regniar 
retirement beaefita replace the tfiabuxty 
benefits,,"' Saul Chramae tfaper. a Chicago 
attorney speexafizing in disabifity cases . 

O, I am interested is purchasing some 
short-term Treasury bflfc. Where can: I buy 
them without paying a brokerage fee? R_ 
Beckham. Edmburg. EL 

A. You can purchase them dtrectly from 
the VS. Treasury, "Investors can write to 
their nearest Federal Reserve Bank far an 
application to purchase Treasury bcQs at 
auction. The whofe transaction can be done 
t hrou g h the mail," said Marc Khhaoow. a 
stockbroker with E.F. Hution. 

- However, investors may find it easier to 
buy Treasury mstruments through their 
local bank or a brokerage company for a 
nornmal fee. around J2S to &\" said 
Klirjanow. 

Hold Board Meeting 

There win be a board meeting of the Non- 
Smofcers Singles Ctdb on Sunday, May ia at 
2:30 p^n. at the Skokie Federal Savings Com- 
mumry Room. Need new people for board. 
Wulptonsuinmgi actmtks and need ideas. 

Install Officers 

Moo-Smokers Singles Cmb wiO hold its 
spring dance and instaHatioo of Dew officers 
at the regular monthly club meeting Sunday, 
May u at 5 p jrn^ at Skokie Federal Savings 
C o mmunity Boom, 200 E. Main St, in 
Barrmglorj. Randy will play. Cost is 53 jO for 
members, $3 for guests. Coffee and soft 
drinks will be provided. Last meeting until 
September. 




8ENCO 



With This Coupon And a $5.00 Gas Purchase 






CONVENIENT SERVICE STATION HOURS AT THIS LOCATION 

731 W. Rollins Rd. 
Round Lake, IL 



NO MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED 

iiiiinnitiiiiiiiiniininiiiiiiiiniiiit 



6ft Lok0*and Nwwipap** 



Thursday May* 5. 19fto 



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Allstate Awards Kandziora 



Tom Kandziora, an em- 
ployee of Allstate Insurance 
Co., has been awarded the 
-company's prestigious 
chairman's . award. An 
Allstate employee for 20 
. years, Kandziora was 
' presented the award for 
exemplary service to the 



Allstate employees as part of 
the company's- year-long 
"Leave It to the Good Hands 
People" employee 

awareness and recognition 
campaign: 
The campaign was 



to 



company and its customers maintain a high level of ser- 
by Allstate President 
Richard J. Haayen and Vin- 
cent Vane, assistant vice 
president of corporate in- 
formation processing. 
The chairman's award is 



their customers, to heighten 
employee pride and en- 
. thusiasm in their jobs and in 
the company, to encourage 
participative company 
management, and to 

employees to Kandziora resides in Lin- 



in- 



centive for 



denhurst with 
four children. 



his wife and 



vice and commitment 

Director Named 

Lee A. Sheridan has joined Signode Corp., Glenview as 
director of research. Sheridan has 17 years o research and 
development experience with both consumer and Ktrial 



presented to outstanding products. He resides in Barrington 

In-Sink-Erator Appoints Wold 



In-Sink-Erator has ap- 
pointed Robert Wold 
national accounts manager 
for the sales of food waste 
disposers and hot water 
dispensers to Sears, 
Roebuck & Co. 

. In his new position, Wold 
will be responsible for the 
sales of the Scars domestic 
and Sears Canada accounts, 
as well as OEM accounts. 

Wold joined Emerson 
Electric Co., In-Sihk- 
Erator's parent company, in 
1983 as territorial ' mer- 
chandise manager for. the 
special products division, a 
manufacturer of bench 
power tools for Sears. 

Prior to that, he worked 
for Sears for 16 years, where 
he held various positions, 
including salesman, 
assistant buyer and division 
manager. 

Wold has a bachelor's 
degree in psychology from 



DePaul University, Chicago. 
He is a resident of Antioch. 

Headquartered in Racine, 
Wis. In-Sink-Erator is the 
world's largest manufac- 
turer of residential and 




commercial food waste 
disposers and hot water 

dispensing systems, and 

markets a line of dish- 
washers and trash com- 
pactors under the In-Sink- 
Erator brand name. 



Rate 

6.56% 



6.44% 



$32.37 



THE GREAT RACE 




$344.40 

oz.| 



10.29% 



w&£(- ^Corporate : ,-:■ 






© 



invcsimcnt 
1986 Garv 



made January 1T19So (updated 
S. Movers ifc Associates, Ltd., 



weeKiy) 
Chicano. III. 



The Mortgage Report 

30-year mortgages 




D J F 



M*A 



May 5, 1986 

Nationwide, the average interest rate on 30-year fixed-rate mortgages 
rose to 10.01 percent from 9,98 percent. Adjustable mortgages tell to 8.72 
percent from 8.84 percent 

In Chicago, 30-year fixed-rate mortgages rose slightly to 9.94 percent 
from 9.92 percent last week. Adjustable mortgages were down, now at 8.44 
percent down from 8.49 percent. 
To have your Institution listed below, call 312-670-2440, 



Minimum 
Rata Type Down ' Term 
Boulevard Bank (836-6496) 
10.88% F . 10% 30 

8.63% A/1 10% 30 

Citicorp Savings (977-5055) 
10.00% F 10% 30 

7.75% A/1 10% 30 

City Federal Mortgage (627-1200) 
10.00% F 5% -30 

8.88% A/1 5-20% 30 

Freedom Federal (789-1075) 

10.13% F 10% 30 

8.38% A/1 10% 30 

Enterprise Savings Bank (930-0900) 
9.63% F 10% 30 

8.50% A/1 10% 30 

Fidelity Federal Savings (736-3000) 
9.75% F 10% 30 

7.90% A/1 10% 30 

First National Chicago (407-3849) 



10.50% 
7.75% 



F 
A/1 



10% 
10% 



Harris Trust (461-2950) 
10.00% F 10-20% 
8.00% A/1 ; 10-20% 



30 
30 



29 
30 



Maxfmum 
Amount 

$115,300 

S350.000 

SI 33,250 

$350,000 

$133,250 
$500,000 

$133,250 
$250,000 



S1 33,250 
$350,000 



$133,250 

$250,000 

$250,000 
$500,000 



$133,250 
$133,250 



Centurion Financial (940-4663) 
10.25% F 10% 30 

10.13% F 10% _ 15 

Tatman Home Mori. Corp. (625-0253) 

9.88% "*! F 5% 30 

8.50% A/1 10%' 30 



$500. 000 
$500,000 



$133,250 
$500,000 



Pts 

3.25% 
3.00% 

3.00% 
3.00% 

2.00% 
3.00% 

3.00% 
3.00% 



3.50% 
3.00% 



3.38% 
3.00% 

3.00% 
3.00% 



3.00% 
2,00% 



3.00% 
3.00% 



3,00% 
2.00% 



Foes 

$250 
$250 

S250 
$250 

$250 
$250 

$250 
$250 

$250 
$250 



S250 
$250 

$300 
$300 



$250 

$250 



$275 
$275 



S275 
$275 



F- Fixed-rate mortgage. A/*- Adjustable rate mortgage, followed by the 
length of the adjustment period, usually expressed In years. All rates are 
subject 1o change without notice. 

©1986 The Meyers Report -- Chicago 



Saving money by using less gas 



THE UNHANDYMANS GUIDE 

TOCAULKING 
AND WEATHERSTRIPPING. 



it*^t.\^<"?. 



One of the best ways to save money on energy costs is to make improvements on your home that will help 
you use less energy, r 

One of the easiest and most worthwhile things you can do is minimize your heating and cooling loss by 
caulking and weatherstripping. \ \ I 

If you live in a typical home and install caulking and weatherstripping, you can trim your energy cost 
for heating by up to $40 per year. You'll recover your investment in two years or less, and after that its 
money in the bank. ' 

Caulking and weatherstripping your house requires a minimum of tools, time and know-how. Even 
not-so-handy homeowners can' easily handle this job. You use caulk to plug air leaks outside and 
weatherstripping inside to seal the openings around doorways and windows. 

WEATHERSTRIPPING— 
THE INDOOR SOLUTION 

Weatherstripping is the best way to stop air leaks. 

To detect hidden drafts inside, make your own 
distress flag by taping a piece of tissue to a pencil. On a 
breezyday use this detector to find air leaks by holding 
it near window sills and doorways. If the tissue moves, 
you've located a spot that needs weatherstripping. 
Here's where to look for drafts: ■ Around all windows 
and door frames ■ Space around pulleys in double-hung 
windows ■ At electrical wall outlets and switches in 
exterior walls* Around heating registers. 

Weatherstripping 
comes in many forms. For 
instance there are threshold 
weatherstripping materials 
designed to fill the gap 
between the bottom of a ^ 
door and'floor. For doors 
and windows, there's 
spring metal or brass 
weatherstripping that's 
inexpensive and effective. 
Self-adhesive plastic 

weatherstripping is more expensive but easier to install. 
As a handy temporary sealer, you can use caulking rope or cord. 

For electrical outlets and light switches, low cost 

foam rubber gaskets can 




"LET'S TALK 
CAULKING" 

First, survey your 
house from the 
outside. Look for 
gaps in the exterior 
walls where you need 
caulk. Note any_ 
missing or sun dried 
caulk especially on 
the south side of your 
house. 

Here's where to look: 
■ Around all window 
and door frames 
■Around exhaust fan 
outlets (bath, kitchen or laundry) ■ Around window air 
conditioners ■ Around holes cut for hose faucet, wires 
and pipes ■ Around the chimney ■ Around lighting 
fixtures ■ Where masonry and siding meet. 

Caulk is a flexible sealant designed to fill cracks and 
gaps in fixed joints of a house. One tube will fill about 25 
feet of a narrow '/*" crack or two small windows. In home 
centers and hardware stores you'll find a variety of caulks 
to choose from, but don't let that scare you. Ordinary 
latex caulk is easy to use and cleanup, and a good bet for 
the first time user. Silconized caulk is more expensive, 
but it lasts considerably longer. If you can afford to use a 
better grade of caulking you won't have to re-do the job 
every few years. 

Check the label to see if the caulk can be painted, 
how long it takes to dry, the type thinner recommended 
for cleanup and what the temperature requirements are. 
Don't' forget to purchase a caulk gun, unless you 
purchase caulk 
that comes in 
pressurized cans. 
Caulk guns usually 
cost only a few 
dollars. 

O Clean out the 
joint thoroughly 
and let dry. H 
Cut the tube tip off at a 45 degree angle making a Va" 
opening. ■ With the tube in the gun, break the seal 
with a nail, B Place the nozzle in the crack and squeeze 
the trigger while pushing the tube away from you to fill 
the gap. ■ Fill deep cracks with several beads of caulk. 
■ Clean up immediately and put a nail in the tube 
nozzle to 'save for re-use. 





Putty Knife 




be used to seal gaps. 
And, in your garage 
molded stripping is 
available to seal your 
garage door. 

Installation is easy 
and you'll find instruc- 
tions with each of these 
products. Metal weather- 
J stripping is easily cut with 



a heavy scissors or tin snips. Plastic is cut with a knife or 
scissors. Before applying adhesive-backed weatherstripping, 
clean the surface behind the glue for maximum grip. 

NOW'S THE TIME. 
Now's a perfect time to get to work on projects like 
caulking and weatherstripping. So why not start now? 

It'll be money in your pocket, when next winter rolls 
around. 



NORTHERN ILLINOIS GAS 

On* of lh« NtCOR bulc anargy companta* 




t 
i 
i 
t 
1 

) 

i 






i 



i 






i 






: 



Thursday May 15, 1986 



Lak«kand Nowtpaptn 71 



-d 



■ ^ IIJI'MiTT *+ r» 



Business 




■■■-- ■;?■:: ■' 



Small 
Business Is 




Business In 
Lak 





General Facts About The Small Business World 



There are about 15 million 
small businesses in tbr 
United States by size Stan 
dards set by the U.S. Smal 
Business Administration 
About half of smal) 
businesses operate full time, 
the rest part time. 

The number of small 
businesses has increased 
steadily during the past 30 
years. In 1385, new business 
incorporations (one measure 
of new businesses) totaled 
about 668,904, a new record. 
The previous record of 
634,991 new business in- 
corporations was set in 1984. 

Fiscal Year 1985 was a 



good year for small 
business. Small business in- 
come, as measured by sole 
proprietorship and part- 
nership income, increased 
12.3 percent during the first 
six months of the year com- 
pared with' the similar 1984 
period. 

Small businesses employ 
.bout half of the private 
work force, contribute 42 
percent of all sales in the 
country and are responsible 
for 38 percent of the gross 
national product. 

One out of every two new 
small businesses will fail 
within the first four years of 



•*••*•••••***••••••• 

* ADVANCE TRAVEL AGENCY * 

• • 



• 



2671 Sheridan Rd. 
Zion, II. 






* • 

• Dottie and Wally Daniels, Owners * 

• (312)746-3713 * 

• * 
•*•*•*•*••*••****••• 



***•**••*•••••*••**• 

. BULK COOKIES. NUTS, CANDIES. ETC . 



• 



ALL 




w 



EIGHS 



345 Park Avenue Mall 
Antioch, Illinois 



• 



• Otto and Lorri Dony, Owners * 

* (312)395-9297 * 

•*•••••***••***•*••• 

*••*•••••***•*•••••* 



• 

• 

• 
• 



ANTIOCH PIZZA SHOP 



994 Route 59 
Antioch, tl. 



Wayne McManus, owner 
(312)395-6777 



• 
• 
• 

• 

* 



• • 

*••••••••**••••*•••* 

•*••••••••***••••••• 

* ANTIOCH TRAVEL AGENCY * 

• • 



* 
• 



425 Lake Street 
Antioch, Illinois 






• «-«: iiif-H.: *~-!_il rt • 



• 



Dottie and Wally Daniels, Owners 
(312)395-0665 



• 

• 
• 



operation, studies show. 
Overall, a firm's chances of 
survival increase with size; 
firms with 20 or more 
workers have a 20 percent 
greater chance of survival 
than firms with fewer than 
20 workers. 

During 1981-82, smal] 
business employment 
proved a moderating force in 
the recession. During these 
years, - small businesses 
produced a total of 2.65 
million new jobs, while large 
businesses were cutting 
their employment by 1.7 
million. Thus all the 984,000 
new jobs generated in 1981-82 
came from small firms. 

Small firms also have led 
employment gains during 
the economic recovery and 
expansion. From October 
1984 through September 
1985, employment in in- 
dustries dominated by small 
businesses (industries in 
which firms with fewer than 
500 employees account for 60 
percent or more of sales or 
employment) rose 5.9 per- 
cent; employment in in- 
dustries dominated by large 
businesses rose six-tenths of 
one percent. 

Jobs generated By small 
firms are more likely to be 
filled by younger workers, 
older workers and women. 
Many of these workers 
prefer or are only able to 
work on a part-time bases, 
and thus can be more easily 
accomodated by small em- 
ployers. 



Small businesses create 
two out of every three jobs, 
and thus are responsible for 
the major cost in initial on- 
the-job training in basic 
skills. 

Studies show that the in- 
cidence of innovation among 
small business workers is 
significantly higher than 
among workers in large 
businesses. Small firms 
produce 2 Vz times as many 
innovations as large firms 
relative to the number of 
persons employed. 

Innovation coming from 
small hi-tech firms is ex- 
pected to increase in the 
coming years as a result of 
the Small Business In- 
novation Research Act. Un- 
der the act, signed by 
President Reagan in 1982, 12 
federal agencies with large 
research and development 
budgets must direct an in- 
creasing amount of R & D 
contracts to small fir- 
ms—the source of most in- 
novations and new 
technologies. During the fir- 
st three years of the act, 
small firms received $400 
million in R & D contracts; 
small firms are expected to 
receive another $400 million 
in Fiscal 1986. 

Small businesses have 
been responsible for more 
than half of the new product 
and services innovations 
developed since World War 
II. 

Almost every energy- 
related innovation of the 



To Honor 
15 Million 



•••*••**•• *<• •••••••• 



The nation's 15 million 
small business owners will 
be honored during the 22nd 
annual National Small 
Business Week, May 18-24. 

Under the theme, "Small 
Business is BIG Business in 
the U.S.A.," contributions of 
small companies will be 
noted at local and state 
ceremonies and at special 
activities in Washington, 
D.C. 

Outstanding small 
business owners from each 
state, the District of Colum- 
bia and Puerto Rico will be 
singled out for special 
; honors as national examples 
of success, advocacy and 
community leadership. The 
"small business person of 



the year" will be selected 
from among the state win- 
ners, who were chosen by 
committees of their peers. 

Small Business Week, 
which was proclaimed by 
President Reagan, is coor- 
dinated by the U.S. Small 
Business Administration. 

In addition to the 52 state 
small business winners, 
Small Business Advocates of 
the Year will be honored 
during the Washington 
ceremonies. They will in- 
clude a young entrepreneur, 
a big business that helped to 
strengthen small business, "a 
small business exporter and 
an innovative small business 
or a supporter of small 
business innovation. 



past century has come from gasoline engine, the electric 
small business-'- for exam- light, the electric auto and 
pie, the air conditioner, the petroleum cracking. 

*•*•••••••*****•*••* 

• 

• 
• 



J EVERLASTING MEMORIALS 

* (Formorly **#A/#r Mmtrish) 

* 33107 N. Highway 45 

* Wildwood, Illinois 

* (312)223-9240 

* George & Lucy Piwowarczyk, 

Owners 



• 
• 



••••*••••*••******** 



• • ».+ •• *•••*•••***•*• 

* yfirtel COATINGS, INC. I 

£ 106 W. Main St. (Rt. 134) £ 

. Round Lake Park, Illinois . 



• 



Don Murphy, Owner 
(312)546-2175 



• 



••••••*••**•** ****** 



*•*•••*•••••*•****** 

• abvctii uiiynnui ai r mm/* • 



CRYSTAL WINDOW CLEANING 



• 

• 

• 
• 



1214 Briar Lane 
Round Lake, Illinois 

Louis Yesulis, Owner 
(312)546-9228 



• 

• 
• 

• 



• * ••• **************** 



••••••*••*•*••*****• 

* CHERYL'S MANE ATTRACTION * 



* 
• 
* 



783 N. Barron Blvd. 
Grayslake, Illinois 



• 
• 
• 



* Cheryl Carmichael, Owner * 

* (312)223-6665 * 

* • 
•*••*•••••••••••**•• 



•••*•••••••*•**••**• 



CENTURY OAKS CABINETS 

43311 No. Hwy. 45 
Antioch, Illinois 



• 
• 

* 43311 No. Hwy. 45 * 

* Antioch, Illinois * 

* DENNIS G. DEMPSEY, Owner * 

* (312)395-3418 * 

* * 
••••••••******•***•* 



• * * * • • ••*****•**••*• ******************** •••*•*••••••*••••••• 



4 




flfiF landfill Corp. 



* "Caring" for the Environment for the Children of 

+ Today and Adults of Tomorrow 

* (1 mile South of Rt. 1 20) 

* Grayslake, Illinois 

* 

* 



(31 2) 223-2722 



• 
* 
• 
: * 
• 

• 



* BACHOFNER CLEANERS 

• 123 Center St. 

* Grayslake, Illinois 

* Brian Bachofner, owner 

• 
• 

• 



(312)223-8731 



• 
• 
• 
• 

• 

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• 



• 
• 
* 
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• 
• 



CASEY ROAD PET MOTEL 

Animal Travel Agency 

1 8753 W. Casey Rd. 
Grayslake, Illinois 

Elice & Oscar Calanca, Owners 
(312)362-3567 



* 
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* 
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• 



*•••••••••***••***** ****•*•'**•*•**••*••• •••*••*********** * * * 

8B Lakeland Newspapers Thursday May 15, 1966 



fi? sisqDcev.'QH bnDterfo ; 



669f.er^DMvobeiuf1T 



S33££=^<^ 



.. • t f- *■' ' + 



" T— •'-T^J Z£3ttB0HMtonrvra 



H ^*M < fc *4 ^,*i 



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■ ».!■,.„.„„ 



-' ■ " «■ •» .~— •>-. — . 



■>^<W«B«««B^I«li»«^i^^HS^Vf^ 



Business 



Small Firms Get Bigger Share of Contracts 



Small businesses in hi-tech 
fields are expected to be' 
awarded $400 million in 
federal research and 
development contracts this 
year through the Small 
Business Innovation. 
Development Act. 

Under the act, which was 
signed by President Reagan 
in 1982. 12 large federal 
agencies must direct an in- 
creasing amount of R & D 



work to small firms. During 
the first three years of the 
SBIR program, small hi-tech 
firms got about |380 million 
in R&D work. 

The SBIR program is 
specifically geared to 
helping small hi-tech firms 
turn ideas into marketable 
products, while still ac- 
complishing needed resear- 
ch. Small hi-tech firms are 
the nation's major source of 



***•••••*•**•••*••** 

* The Fish Bowl Jbo * 

* 115 Center St. »fip * 

* Grayslake, Illinois ^2^ * 

* * 

• Florence Prohaska, Owner • 

• (312)223-2800 $ 

• * 
••••*•••**•****•••*• 

•**•*••**•••*••**••• 



* 



FRED'S RESTAURANT 

225 Center St. 
Grayslake, Illinois 

Fred Sykes, Owner 
(312)223-9776 

Closed Sundays As Of May 1 1, 1986 



• 
• 

• 

• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 



******* *■* •••*•* * * * • • 



**••*••**••*•*••*••* 

: LYNN'S CLIP AND DIP ** 



* 
• 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



19 E. RollinsRd. 
Round Lake Beach, Illinois 

Linda Tieman, Owner 
(312) 740-9337 



* 
• 

• 
• 

• 
* 
• 



•**•••**•*•*•*•**•** 
••••**•••***•**•**•• 



• 
• 
• 
• 
* 
• 
* 
• 
* 
• 



MOLIDOR'S STANDARD 
SERVICE 

Nippers ink Road & Route 134 
Round Lake, II. 

Jerry Molidor, owner 
(312)546-9824 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
• 
* 
• 
* 
• 




•*•••*••***•******** 

±> ••**••• 

• 

• 
• 
* 
• 

* 
* 
* 
* 
• 



• 
* 
• 
• 
• 
* 
• 
* 
• 



JH&t*tdehi*i 



406 N. Seymour 
AAundelein, II. 

John Maguire, owner 
(312)566-6364 



•••••**•*•*•******** 
*•••*•••************ 



* 

• 
• 
• 
* 
* 
• 
* 
* 
• 



NEW CENTURY DANK 

2000 S. Lake St. 
AAundelein, II. 

(31 2) 566-2000 

Member F.D.I.C. 



* 
• 

• 
* 

• 
* 
• 
• 

* 
• 



new products and new 
technologies. 

More than 20,000 proposals 
for research projects have 
been submitted by small fir- 
ms since the program began. 

The R and D awards come 
in two stages: 

The first, with a general 
limit of $50,000, is intended to 
evaluate the merit of an 
idea. 



The second phase, with 
awards up to $500,000, is 
aimed at further develop- 
ment of the original ideas; 
between 30 and 40 percent of 
Phase I recipients go on to 
get Phase II awards. 

The third phase of the 
program involves getting 
private venture capital to 
bring the idea to market. 

Long-term supporters of 
the SBIR concept say the 



program gives some of the 
most creative companies in 
the country a chance to 
prove ideas that may be too 
far out and too risky for the 
private venture capital in- 
dustry. As SBIR awardees 
carry out federal research, 
supporters argue, the small 
firms will strengthen their 
credibility among private in- 
vestors. 

The 12 federal agencies 



directly involved in boosting 
small business R&D awards 
are the Depts. of 
Agriculture, Commerce, 
Defense, Education, 
Energy, Health and Human 
Services, Interior and Tran- 
sportation; Environmental 
Protection Agency, National 
Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration, National Scien- 
ce Foundation and Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission. 



1980s: Decade Of Entrepreneur 



The 1980's, according to business activity, hit a new 
economists, university high of 668,904 last year; 



professors and newspaper 
and magazine articles, are 
developing into the decade of 
the entrepreneur. Even 
some giant corporations are. 
claiming that at the heart of 
their disassembled assem- 
bly lines they have en- 
trepreneurial souls. 

By definition, an en- 
trepreneur is a man or 
woman who is an employer 
of productive labor, a person 
who undertakes to carry out 
.an enterprise. 

Most of the nation's en- 
trepreneurs are small 
business men and women; 
by size standards set by the 
U.S. Small Business Ad- 
ministration, 99 percent of 
the country's companies are 
small. Government 
statistics show there are 
about 15 million small 
businesses in the U.S. 

Other government figures 
support the. growing belief 
that entrepreneurship is on 
the rise. New business in- 
corporations, a good sign of 



such incorporations total immigrant, 

almost two million over the Economists and other ob- 

last three years, a record by servers of today's business 

far. scene cite two main reasons 

More than 20 million new f ° r l *»e entrepreneurial 

jobs have been created over boom:, 

the last 10 years, and almost —Americans since the 

all have been generated by beginning have displayed an 

small businesses. independent spirit and have 

Along the way have come *™™* of ^ing their own 



wasn't born in the U.S. but porations and urban society 
came to the country as an have spurred an increasing 



a bunch of new industries 
and new products, 
everything from erasable 
memory computer chips to 
fast-growing regional 
airlines. 

Business observers say 
that there are new players in 
today's entrepreneurial 
boom. There still are the 
tinkerers, the dreamers and 
the malcontents. But today's 
entrepreneur is more likely 
than before to have a big 
business school education or 
big corporation track 
record. There also is a good 
chance that the founder of a 
1980s business is't male or 
white— and that he or she 



bosses. 

—The personal and 
physical restraints 
associated with giant cor- 

•***•••*•• 
* 

• 
• 
* 
• 
* 
* 
* 
• 
* 



REED HILLS FLORIST 

291 Peterson Rd; 
Libertyville, tl 

Pat LaPorta, owner 
(312) 680-8644 



number of men and women 
to set out on their own. 

Reagan Administration of- 
ficials argue for a third 
reason, contending that 
President Reagan's policies 
and programs— including 
lower taxes, less regulation 
and less paperwork, plus the 
resulting and continuing 
economic prosperity— have 
spawned a climate that en- 
courages more people to set 
out on their own. 

•***•*•**• 

• 
* 

• 

* 

* 
• 

• 
* 



•'* * * * * * * * *•**•••*••• 
*••**•***•*•**•****• 



Small Business 
Big In U.S.A. 



At first glance, the 
average American small 
business isn't all that much: 
A boss overseeing a few. 
workers or perhaps the boss 
alone, working as a sole 
proprietorship. 

But there's a much better 
measurement: Put the 
nation's 15 million small 
businesses in a pot, and 
small business turns out to 
be mighty big business. In- 
deed, the economic health of 
all depends in large part on 
the health of America's 
small businesses. 

Small entrepreneurs, still 



in industries dominated by 
large corporations. 

National Small Business 
Week, to be noted May 18-24, 
gives all of us a chance to 
pay special salute to small 
business men and 
women— those en- 

trepreneurs operating in our 
town and state and across 
the country. During the 
week, which was proclaimed 
by President Reagan and is 
coordinated by the U.S. 
Small Business Ad- 
ministration, special tribute 
will go to outstanding small 
business owners- in each 



• 
• 
• 
• 

* 
• 
• 
* 
• 
• 



REED HILLS FLORIST 

137 Center St. 
Grayslake, II. 

Pat LaPorta, owner 
(312)223-8361 



* 
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• 

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• 

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• 



•••*•*•**••••*•**••• 
••••*••••***•••***** 

* 



mostly men but including a state( select by their peers 
fast-growing number of as having recorded their own 



* 
• 
• 
* 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 



RALPH'S 
GREENHOUSE FLORIST 

11 S. Fairfield Rd.. 
Round Lake, IL 

Lars Parker, owner 
(312)546-2185 



* 

• 
* 
* 

• 
* 
• 
• 
* 



women (and of minorities), 
employ about half the 
private work force, are 
responsible for about 40 per- 
cent of national production, 
create (by far) the most new 
jobs and account for most 
new products and new 
technologies. During con- 
tinuing prosperity, statistics 
show that employment in in- 
dustries dominated by small 
firms has risen more than 
twice as fast as employment 



business successes and as 
having made significant con- 
tributions to the small 
business community and to 
their home communities. 

The theme of this year's 
Small Business Week is 
especially appropriate: 
"Small Business is BIG 
business in the U.S.A." Big 
business in the country and 
in our hometown, for which 
we should be ever thankful. 



••••••***•********** 

••*••**•••••*•****•• 



* 
• 
* 
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• 
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RALPH'S 
GREENHOUSE FLORIST 

10 N. Forest Ave, 
Fox Lake, II. 

Lars Parker, owner 
(312)587-8244 



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* 
* 
• 
* 
• 
* 



•••*•*••** 

• 
• 

• 

130 West Main * 

Round Lake Park, II. * 

Wayne McManus, owner * 

(312)546-2425 * 

* 



*••••••• •• ••****»*** 

Thursday May 15, 19«6 



ul 



J: « 



cr \ 



* * * * ****** 

* THE PIZZA PUCE 

* 

• 

• 

* 
••••*•••• 



***•••****••******** 
• *••***•*••*****.***•' 



* 

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• 

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* 

• 



QUALITY AUTO PARTS, INC. 

620 E. Hawley 
. AAundelein, II. 

John Bosco, owner 
(312)949-0606 



* 

* 
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Business 



Bristol To Get Commercial Development By End Of May 



Amoco is expected to 
break ground for its 21-pump 
service station and con- 
venience mart at the in- 
tersection of Hvvys. 1-94 and 
50 by the end of May. 

Roger Hoff, Racine, owner 
of Hardee's fast food 
restaurant in Kenosha, is 



also expected to start con- 
struction on another Har- 
dee's at the same in- 
tersection by the end of the 
month. 

And a significant new 
commercial development 
project at the northwest 
intersection of Hwys. 1-94 



••••*••••••••******* 

: ROYAL RADIATOR SERVICE I 



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266 Center Street 
Grayslake, ll. 

George Hogan, owner 

(312)223-2330 
(312)223-2327 



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RUSTIC MANOR RESTAURANT 

4660 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, II. 

Try our Sunday Brunch 
1 0:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 

(312)662-2789 



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S & S BODY SHOP 

18636 W. Belvidere Rd. 
Wild wood, ll. 

Pete Solecki, owner 
(312)223-0426 



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••••••*•••*••••••••• 
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* STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL, LTD * 



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410 E. Belvidere Rd. 
Grayslake, II. 

David Strang, owner 
(312)223-8122 



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•••••••*•••••••••••• 

* UPHOLSTERY BY JOHN * 

• • 

^ 49 W.Grand Ave. * 

jl. {across from Lake Villa Fire Department) + 
+ Lake Villa, II. * 

* John & Darlene Hall, owners * 

* (312)356-7474 * 

•••*••••••*••*••**** 



and 50 in Bristol Twp. has 
also been unveiled. 

William Ruelz, president 
of Bristol Development 
Corp. made the an- 
nouncement of a planned 
mixed use development 
named 'Bristol Parkway.' 
Bristol Development Corp. 
which consist of a group of 
local business persons 
committed to southeastern 
Wisconsin. 

The development will 
encompass 103 acres of land 
in Bristol Twp. 

Ructz indicated that over 
the past 18 months of 
acquisition and planning, the 
corporation could not have 
realized this development 
without the enthusiastic 
support of Noel Elfering, 
Bristol town chairman. 
Many other state and local 
officials have assisted in 
bringing the development to 
reality. 

In addition, Ruetz stated 
that the development 
compliments WEPCo's 1,300 
acre industrial park, located 
three miles east of their 
project. 

In order to assure con- 
tinuity of effort, Bristol 
Parkway is a totally planned 
development encompassing 
a manufacturers outlet 
square, motel facilities, 
restaurants, an office park 
and an area for service 
facilities. 

With a total projected cost 
of 70 million dollars this 
project will be among one of 
the largest in southeastern 
Wisconsin. 

Located on one of the 
highest traffic count in- 
terchanges in the midwest, 
Bristol Development Corp. is 
confident that a high quality 
project is feasible and 



needed. The site enjoys 
excellent visibility for those 
traveling the interstate 
system and is easily ac- 
cessible with a full traffic 
interchange. 

Ruetz stated that, being a 
local businessman, and 
attorney for Bristol Twp., he 
is insisting the project to be a 
model of sound planning and 
design. As part of this goal, 
Ructz indicated that the 
project will be one in which 
southeastern Wisconsin 
should be able to point to 
with pride. 

At present, engineering 
contracts have been signed 
for the internal road con- 
struction and overall site 
preparation, with actual 
construction to begin at the 
end of May. 

Negotiations are presently 
underway with two major 
motel chains with con- 
struction scheduled to begin 
in late summer. 

The manufacturers outlet 
square will be a new concept 
to the midwest, although it 
has received high ac- 
ceptance in the south and 
west. Scheduled for opening 
in late fall, the manufac- 
turing firms represented will 
enjoy a clustering of 
buildings versus a mall and 
will feature an open cour- 
tyard as a focal point. 

Through this design the 
firms will have a greater 
control of their space and the 
space immediately 
surrounding their facility. 
Specific manufacturers have 
been contacted and have 
shown not only support but 
also a strong desire to be 
included in the first phase of 
the project. 

The second phase of the 
project will include the 



Announce Small 
Business Awards 



Eleven small businessper- 
sons were announced as Ad- 
vocate and Special Award 
Winners, 1986, in observance 
of Small Business Week, 
May 18-24. 

Awards in eleven 
categories were presented to 
the following persons : 

Accountant Advocate of 
the Year — Robert L. Had- 
dad, Price Waterhouse, 
Boston, Mass. 

Financial Services Ad- 
vocate of the Year — An- 
thony R. Wilkinson, 
Stillwater National Bank 
and Trust Co., Stillwater, 
Okla. 

Media Advocate of the 
Year — Homer Brickey, The 
Blade, Toledo, Ohio. 

Minority Advocate of the 
Year — John M. Kearney, 
Hughes Aircraft Co., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Veteran Advocate of the 
Year - Tony Diamond, 
Brotherhood Rally of 



American Veterans 
Organization (BRAVO), 
Woodland Hills, Calif. 

Women in Business Ad- 
vocate of the Year — Judi 
Schindler, Schindler Public 
Relations, Inc., Chicago, 111. 

Small Business Exporter 
of the Year — Robert Drexel 
Shockey, Drexel Chemical 
Co., Memphis, Tenn. 

Small Business Develop- 
ment Award — Jack 
Sheehan, Illinois Bell and 
AmeritechCo., Chicago, 111. 

Small Business Young En- 
trepreneur of the Year — 
Douglas A. Wilbrandt, 
C.B.D. Landscaping, Inc. 
and Art Floral Shop and Con- 
servatory, Crystal Lake, 111. 

Small Business Innovation 
Award — Naum Staroselsky, 
Compressor Controls Corp., 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

First Place in Poster Con- 
test — Cindy Bartosiak and 
Barbara Manegold, Design 
Strategies, Freeport, 111. 



expansion of the 
manufacturers outlet 
square, creation of an office 
park and the development of 
the service facilities area. In 
this area, service industries 
and suppliers will enjoy a 
park like setting for their 
facilities. With the central 



location of the site, midway 
between Milwaukee and 
Chicago, firma looking to 
expand to a regional basis 
will find an optimal location. 
Bristol Development Corp. 
expects to announce another 
local development in the 
next two months. 



Volunteers Wanted 

Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Lake County would like to 
invite interested men and women to learn more about the 
program at an orientation meeting at 7 p.m., Monday, May 
19. Volunteers agree to share three to five hours a week with 
a child in need of a friend. For more information, call (312) 
360-0770. 

Singlet To Dine At Gotsby't 

Non-Smokers Singles Club will enjoy a relaxing meal and 
socialize Wednesday, May 28, 6:30 p.m., at Gatsby's 
Restaurant at Renwood Country Club, located on Hainesville 
Rd., just south of Rollins Rd., in Round Lake Beach. Call 
Joann at (312) 223-6846 for reservations; or last minute, call 
the restaurant at (312) 546-8257. 

•••••••••*•••******* 



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WHITE HEN PANTRY 

579 Route 173 
Antioch, Illinois 



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• Don and Sally Rodgers, Owners * 

• (312)395-4520 * 

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•••••**••••••••••*** 

••••••*••••*••****** 

* WEST END HEATING * 

* ft AIR CONDITIONING, INC. * 



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819 W. Rollins Rd. 
Round Lake, IL 

Skip Marunde, owner 
(312)546-4800 



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••••••••••••••**•••• 



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The Family Store 

WELTON'S FOOD MART 

4274 Old Grand Ave. 

Gurnee, II. 

Art Welton, owner 
(312)662-4704 



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WELTON'S COUNTY MARKET * 



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3555 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, II. 

Dick Welton, owner 
(312)336-0980 



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•••••••••••••******* •••••••••••••••••••• 



* VONCO PRODUCTS, INC. 

• 

201 Park Ave. 
Lake Villa, II. 



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L.L. Laske, owner 
(312)356-2323 



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W.W. TREE SERVICE 

1 123 Hickory Terrace 
Round Lake Beach, II. 

Rocky Wheeler, owner 
(312)546-8733 



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• •*••• •■• •••••••***** •••••••••*•••••••••• 



**•••*•••••*•*•••••• 

* WAYNE'S GURNEE PIZZA * 



* . 1810Delany Rd., * 

* Gurnee, II. * 

* * 

* Wayne McManus, owner * 

* (312)623-9552 * 

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• •.••*•••*** 4 •••*•••• 



1 0B Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday May 15, 1986 



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Panthers 




All the Round Lake 
Panthers had to do this week 
was win one of their last two 
Northwest Suburban Con- 
ference games to clinch at 
least a tie for the league title. 

The Panthers were 
scheduled to play at John- 
sburg May 12 and at 
Wauconda May 14. Going 
into this week's action, 
Round Lake was 11-1 in the 



conference and 16-5 overall. 

They were one game 
ahead of the Grant Bulldogs 
going into the Johnsburg 
game with only two games 
remaining for each team. 

The Panthers are 
currently on a mint-hot 
streak, winning all five of 
their games last week. 

They defeated the 
Marengo Indians May 5 by a 



NWSC Championship Title 



score of 13-7. Joe Lobinger 
was the winning pitcher in 
relief of Bill Hart. 

There were many who 
managed more than one hit 
on the day: Damon Horn (2- 
5), Curt Schmidt (3-4), Doug 
Sparks (2-2), Chuck Banker 
(3-5), Brett Ligenza (2-4) 
and Lobinger (3-4, including 
a home run). 

The Panthers then 



defeated McHenry 13-6 in a 
non-conference battle May 6. 
The winning pitcher was 
Horn. 

On May. 7, Round Lake 
beat Marian Central 14-7 
behind Keith Schmidt, who 







Givinq His Best Shot 

Round Lakfs Mike Carlson gets ready to land in the triple jump at the Northwest 
Suburban Conference track meet hosted by the Panthers May 9. Grayslake won 
the meet.— Photo by Craig Vogel. 



Tll6 L6SS0H^By Gary Flowers 

OH. Old Oakland Golf Club. 
.)) X 11611 E. 75th St 
It \jndps.. IN 46236 




Last week the adjustments were outlined describing the 
procedure when the ball lies higher or above the golfer's feet 
Now, the opposite situation will be focused upon, when the 
ball is below or lower than the feet. 1) Bend the body a little 
more at the waist than in a normal stance. 2) As in the 
illustration, the hands need to be higher at address to allow 
the sole of the club to confirm to the hillside. 3) Consciously 
put more weight back on the heels-even though the natural 
posture would cause leaning forward onto the toes. 4) Keep 
the head quite still and maintain an easy balance throughout 
the swing. As in the opposite lie, use one club more than 
needed for the same distance on a level lie and aim slightly 
left as this lie causes one to push or slice the ball. 



AJ QmrLFlMa 

\) X miitn*si 




went 3-4 at the plate and 
pitched the Panthers to the 
seven-run win. 

Other big hitters for the 
Panthers in this one included 
Curt Schmidt (3-5), Banker 
(3-5), Hart (2-4) and Bob 
Akers(2-3). 



To round out the week, 
Round Lake defeated a 
tough Lake Zurich squad 6-4 
in continuation game and 10- 
7 in the night-cap. 

Sparks was the winner in 
both contests. 



Warren 
Wins 2 

Better play on defense will 
be the key factor in just how 
far Warren Twp. High 
baseball team advances in 
next week's regional tour- 
nament. 

"Hopefully we can play 
some better defense and do 
decently in the regional," 
Warren coach Ron Shelton 
said. 

The Blue Devils compete 
in the Grayslake regional, 
although the team's seed 
was not known at press time. 
Warren completes regular 
season play with a home 
game against Lake Forest 
May 15. 

WTHS beat North Chicago 
and Antioch last week before 
losing twice to Libertyville 
for an 8-8 NSC mark, 9-11 
overall. 

"We feel we have played 

well as of late," Shelton said. 

Pitcher Tom Thompson 

stopped the Warhawks 11-5 

to open the week's play. 

Brad Beitzcl pitched what 
Shelton called "a real good 
game" in a 15-5, six-inning 
win over Anlioch's Sequiots. 
Against Libertyville May 
11, Warren dropped a close 9- 
6 decision to the Wildcats 
before losing the nightcap 18- 
6. 

"We made it close at the 
end. The trouble was we 
played poor defense. -Nolan 
(Russ) pitched pretty well," 
Shelton said or the first 
game. 



Lancer Netters Reach 
National JC Tourney 



by JOHN PHELPS 

The weekend of May 3-4, 
the CLC mens tennis team 
capped off what has been a 
brilliant season by 
qualifying for the National 
Tournament following a 
second-place finish in the 
Region IV tourney held in 
Rockford. 

Lake County finished the 
two-day tourney, with 16 
points, second to champion 
College of DuPage, who 
ended with 32 total points. 
Other respective finishers 
were Sauk Valley in third 
with 15, Thornton 15, Joliet 
11, Wright 9, Moraine Valley 
7, Harper 5, Illinois Valley 
and Kankakee 3, Triton 2, as 
was ' Waubonsee and M- 
cHenry, Rock Valley and 
Truman 1, and Elgin 0. 

Individually for the 
Lancers, No. 1 singles Dave 
Klein, formerly from 
Waukegan West H.S., was 
upset in the semi-finals by 
Mike Shearbom of Sauk 
Valley, 7-5, 6-4. Klein thus 
finished third in the tourney. 
At No. 2 singles, Fred A cos La 
out of Zion Benton H.S., 
placed second, as he was 
dethroned in the finals by 
Jim Bowers of DuPage, 6-1, 
6-2. Unseeded No. 3 singles 
Lonnie Grote, out of Antioch 
High School, scored a big 
upset over the No. 2 seeded 
Greg Hajdich of Thornton, 6- . 
7, 6-3, and 7-5. Unfortunately, 
Grote ultimately lost in the 
semi-finals to Jeff Redfield 
of Sauk Valley, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 
thus finishing third. At No. 4 
singles Mark Nordby, in his 
first year out of Maine East 
H.S., collected a second 
place finish, as he made it to 
the finals before losing to 



VeeJay Zala of DuPage, 6-3, 
6-4. 

In the No. 5 singles 
position for Lake County, 
Bob Bramhill out of Lake 
Forest High School, also 
seeded No. 2, was upset in 
the quarter-finals by Bob 
Fowler of Joliet, fr4, 0-6, 6-4. 
And in the No. 6 singles slot, 
No. 3 seeded Chris Kendra, 
out of Grant High School was 
outlasted by his opponent, 7- 
5, 2-6 and 6-2. 

In doubles competition, 
the Lancers top tandum of 
Klein/ Acosta finished third, 
following a semi-finals 
ousting by DuPage's Jim 
Bowers/Steve Moniszko, 6-2, 
6-1. At No. 2 doubles, 



G rote/Bra m hi 11 were out- 
dueled by Jamie 
Estanilana/Greg Teodure of 
DuPage, 6-3, 7-6. Number 3 . 
doubles Nordby/ Dave 
Boyke of CLC, were ousted 
in the semi-finals by 
DuPage's Jim Towns/Chad 
Murphy, 6-3, 6-1. 

The National Junior 
College Tourney, to be held 
at the end of this month in 
Tyler, Texas. "It was an 
exciting tournament, as it 
came down to the last 
match. We were vying with 
Thornton and Sauk Valley 
for second, and the cards fell 
our way. Overall, this has 
been a terrific year and the 
guys deserve it!", Lancer 
coach Lance Laverty said. 



CLC's Kloberdanz 
Top Boardman 



According to the final 198G 
men's basketball statistics 
released by the National 
Junior College Athletic 
Assn., Mike Kloberdanz was 
the top total rebounder in the 
nation. He pulled down 446 
rebounds in 32 games for the 
College of Lake County Lan- 
cers. 

Kloberdanz finished the ' 
season with an average of 
13.9 rebounds per game, 



making him the country's 
seventh leading junior 
college boardman in that 
category. 

He also won the Skyway 
Conference rebounding title 
as well as placing on top of 
the final Illinois JC statistics 
for rebounds. 

Kloberdanz is a 1980 
graduate of St. Gilbert's 
School in Grayslake. 



Enter Tourneys 



Dug Out Park in Trevor 
has set the dates for two 12- 
inch slow pitch tournaments. 
The Canfield's Memorial 12- 
inch will be held on May 24, 
25, and 26. 

Then on May 31 and June 1 
there will be the 12-inch 



USSSA Tournament which 
will be a state qualifying 
tourney for class "D" teams. 

Entry is $80. For more in- 
formation please call Tom 
Furlan at (414)862-9936 or 
(312)395-5788. 



Try Our 3-Month Long Sub 



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news in our town written by Post Office 

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ThursdayMay15,1986 






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S ports 



Sequoits Win Dou 




The Antioch varsity 
iiamondmen took the 
Fenton Bisons in both games 
of a double header played on 
May 10, 3-1, 7-5. 

Sequoit pitcher Steve 
Pappadakis, retired the 



entire Fenton lineup for the 
first five innings of the 
opener and only gave up 
three hits in the next two 
innings. 

Pappadakis has been 
steadily improving his 



pitching as the season 
progresses according to 
Sequoit Coach Rich Brown. 

Antioch ' exploded in the 
fourth inning of the second 
game to set the pace for that 
game's final two-run edge. 



Grant Finds That Two 
Losses Are One Too Many 



It was Bob Cord, Brian 
Pankouskis and Mike 
Galdine who accounted for 
those runs. 

Pitcher Rick Risch, who 
eliminated five and gave up 
six hits, took the credit for 
game number two. 

The Antioch softball team 
not only won its double 
header against Fenton, but 
did so resoundingly, beating 
the Bisons 9-7, and 10-0. 



This puts the Sequoits in 
second place with Mundelein 
one game ahead in the North 
Suburban Conference. 

The Sequoits were behind 
at the start of the first game 
until Julie Sexton lit the fire 
for the big comeback. Sexton 
had a two-run homer, a 
double, a triple and five 
RBIs. 

Kim Alfano had two triples 



for four RBIs and Debbie 
Sigler also slammed a two 
run homer in the first game. 

The Sequoits' Wonder 
Woman, Denise Maple was 
the winning pitcher for both 
games after relieving the 
pitcher that the started the 
second game, Don Harp. 

Those two wins give the 
Sequoits a 16-3 overall and 
13-2 in conference play. 



After playing at a pace 
that, in other years, would 
guarantee a conference 
championship, the Grant 
baseball Bulldogs appear to 
be headed for a second place 
finish with only two losses. 

For whatever it is worth, 
the team can take some con- 
solation from the fact that 
both losses were to the team 
that appears certain to win 
the division: the Round Lake 
Panthers. 

In the final week and a half 
of play, the Bulldogs' bats 
were as hot as ever. The 
team beat Johnsburg 10-8, 
Grayslake 8-5, and Marian 

Central 6-3. Joe Vocke, Mike 
Kazlausky, Jim Theobald, 
Mark Borton, and Frank 



Geu continued to rank 
among the conference's 
leading hitters as they com- 
bined for 15 runs batted in 
during the week and hit an 
overall .415. 

Mike McDonald was the 
winning pitcher in the games 
against Johnsburg and 
Marian, raising his con- 
ference record to 6-2. Joe 
Vocke raised his conference 
record to 2-0 as he beat 
Grayslake. 

Varsity baseball coach, 
Fritz Kazlausky, is par- 
ticularly excited about 
prospects for next season. 
"We will have eight or nine 
juniors returning and the 
sophomores coming up put 
together an excellent record. 
We should have an ex- 



perienced, solid team next 
year. Of course, you had to 

figure that if you put 
together a season like the 
one we had this year, you 
should have a championship. 

It is unusual to see a baseball 
team win the conference 
with only one loss," 
Kazlausky said. He added 
that the only thing he would 
really like to see added for 
next year is a good top-notch 
pitcher. 

After finishing up the con- 
ference season with games 
against Wauconda and Lake 
Zurich this week, the 
Bulldogs will go to the 
Waukegan Regional begin- 
ning Monday, May 19. 



Mustangs Sweep ZeeBees, 
Aimimg To Challenge Grant 



The Mundelein High 
School varsity baseball team 
will challenge Stevenson at 
home on Thursday, May 15 
and a non-conference game 
against Grant away on 
Saturday, May 17. They 
were expected to face Niles 
North on May 13. 

The Mustangs swept a 
doubleheader again Zion- 



Benton beating the ZeeBees 
6-5 during eight innings in 
the first game and 9-3 in the 
second, bringing their con- 
ference record to 9-7. 

Winning pitcher in the first 
game was , senior ■ right- 
hander Dan Word, whose 
record is now 7-2 overall. In 
hitting, Word had three hits, 



with a double and a triple. 

Eric Regez had also 
singled in Word for a win- 
ning run. 

During the second game, 
Scott Dressendorfer had 
three hits with two triples. 
Winning pitcher was Jay 
Retzinger who struck out six 
and walked one. 



Season Ends For CLC 



Rams Lose All Hope 
Of Northwest Title 



byOANG.O'SHEA 

The Grayslake Rams lost 
hopes of a Northwest 
Suburban Conference 
baseball title last week by 
losing two important con- 
ference games. 

The week started out well 

for the Rams with a 13-2 win 

over Marian Central as they 

boosted their league record 

to 6-3. Mike Langer went the 

distance on the mound, 

allowing one earned run 

while striking out six and 

walking none. Tom Castino 

was 3-5 with three runs 

batted in, Jeff West was 2-3 

including a home run and 

three RBI's, Russ Hendricks 

was 2-4 with two RBI's and 

Bill Sangbusch was 2-5 with 

two RBI's. 



The Rams' bad luck 
started in the following 
game as they lost to Grant 8- 
5 in eight innings. The 
Bulldogs took an early 4-0 
lead, but the Rams battled 
back to tie the score in the 
fourth inning at 4-4. Grant 
took a 5-4 lead in the sixth, 
but the Rams scored again in 
the se\ujnlh to make it 5-5 
and put the game into extra 
innings. Grant scored three 
runs in the eighth to sew up 
the victory. 

Kelly Bye pitched all eight 
innings of the Grant game 
for the Rams. Langer had 
two doubles for Grayslake, 
and Bye and Castino had two 
hits apiece. 

Grayslake dropped its 
second game of the week to 



Wauconda 11-10. "We took 
an 8-0 lead in the third, but 
we couldn't hold on," said 
Rams coach Jim Haas. 
Sangbusch started the game 
for the Rams and Langer 
relieved in the sixth. Castino 
was the offensive star, going 
4-5 and hitting for the cycle 
with a single, double, triple 
and home run. West went 3-5, 
while Langer and Greg 
Dunski had two hits each. 
Sangbusch also had a home 
run for Grayslake. 

Grayslake was scheduled 
to wrap up its conference 
schedule with road games 
this week against Marengo 
and Johnsburg. The Rams 
host Zion-Benton Friday, 
May 16 in a non-conference 
game and enter regional 
tournament play next week. 



by JOHN PHELPS 

The weekend of May 3-4, 
the College of Lake County 
unfortunately concluded this 
season, as they were ousted 
in the double-elimination 
Sections Tourney held, at 
Harper College. 

CLC faced McHenry in a 
game which they won, 8-6. 
Lancer starting pitcher 
Craig Chiovalero went the 
distance, allowing 6 runs, 
scattered 10 hits, struckout 
10, and allowed 2 walks, as 
Lake County prevailed. 

Offensively, Lancer 
Gerrard Guistino was 2-for-5 
with a triple, homcrun, and 4 



rbi's. Steve Jarrell was2-for- 
4, including 2 doubles and 2 
rbi's, while Frank Diana had 
a three hit, 2 rbi per- 
formance. Then the roof 
caved in on CLC, as it 
dropped the first game of the 
day against Harper, 18-12, 
arid then saw defeat at the 
hands of Oakton, 1 1-1. 

In the game versus 
Harper, Vince Gawerecki 
started on the mound, 
allowed 10 runs, scattered 13 
hits, struck out 10, and 
walked 1 in the losing 'effort. 
Chris VcrHagcn collected 4 
hits and 3 rbi's, Gerrard 
Guistino 2 hits, including a 



homer and 2 rbi. Dan Novak 

also showed his log-ball 
power, as he clubbed two in 
the game. Novak gained 5 
rbi's with the two-round- 

Jrippers. Third-baseman 
Roger Knutel also collected 2 

. hits, along with an rbi in the 
losing cause. 

In the game against 
Oakton, CLC self-destructed, 
as Lancer Coach Bob Roth 
said: "We were unable to 
make routine plays due to 
drastic mental lapses. This 
year has been evident of this. 
We'll play well one day, then 
have these mental 
dispositions, and the result is 
not satisfying." 



Mustangs Win Sectional 



Dy STEVE PETERSON 

As far as Mundelein girls 
track coach Rich Foss is con- 
cerned, the Mustangs have 
already had one banner 
year. 

Getting to the state track 
meet as a competitor has 
been the reward for girls 
track athletes since East St. 
Louis Lincoln started 
dominating the meets more 
than 10 years ago. 

"Coaches like to call the 
state meet the East St. Louis 
Lincoln Invitational. They're 
so good they just let the other 
teams come. It's a culim- 
nation of a lot of hard work 
throughout the season," 
Foss said of the state meet. 

Mundelein will be coming 
off a day at Algonquin 
Jacobs that the Mustangs 
will be remembering for 
some time to come. 

The Mustangs held off 
challenges from Barrington 
and Cary-Grove to come 
away with the sectional title 
May 10. • 

Mundelein finished with 46 
points, 10 ahead of 
Barrington and Cary-Grove, 



which were tied for second. 
Other Lakeland area 
finishes included Antioch's 
sixth-place 21 points; Car- 
mel For Girls was tied with 
Crystal Lake Central with 16 
points for 10th; Johnsburg 
was 11th at 10 points. Grant 
tied Elgin Larkin with three 
points for the 17th spot. 
Round Lake, Wauconda and 
Grayslake were shutout. 

Foss said he felt confident 
about his team's chances af- 
ter Pam Kinklcaar won the 
3,200 meter low hurdles in 
46.7. 

"We felt pretty certain of 
our chances after Pam won 
the 3,200 lows. We were pret- 
ty confident," Foss said. 

Kinkleaar also gave Mun- 
delein points in the 100-meter 
low hurdles with a 14.0. 

Lisa Robinson will join 
Kinkleaar as a two-event 
competitor in Charleston. 

Robinson finished second 
in the shot put at 35 »//' and 
second in the discus at 108' 
1". 

Carrie Fuller of Mundelein 
finished second to 
Barrington's Becky Peter- 



son in the 1,600 meter run. 

Mundelein had two strong 
showings in the 400-meter 
relay and a new event, the 
3,200 meter relay. 

The Mustangs took top 
honors in the 400 with a 51.4 
clocking. 

The performance in the 
3,200 was suprising. Over- 
coming a disadvantage of a 
lane six assignment, Mun- 
delein's foursome knocked 
29 second off its previous 
best with a 9:55.8, good 
enough for second place. 

Stephanie Hertel was third 
in. the long jump and Lisa 
White was third in the 3,200 
meter run. 

The title in the sectional 
makes up for a somewhat 
disappointing dual meet and 
conference season. 

"We went into the season 
with pretty high hopes. We 
were undefeated last year in 
duals. We felt we would be 
strong in conference. But we 
had some injuries and were 
7-3 in duals. It was somewhat 
of a disappointment in con- 
fernce but this makes up for 
it," Foss said. 



[A NNIVERSARY COUPON I ANNIVERSARY COUPON] 

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For The Pat's 

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EXPIRES May 22. 1 986 ^ 



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Present this coupon when ordering. One 

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combination with any other. 

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126 Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday May 4 5.-1-966 






- J . 




Kentucky Offers One Of The Largest Inland Lakes 



.Kentucky Lake Vacalionland (KLV) in 
western Kentucky has the advantage of of- 
fering one of the country's largest inland 
lakes. Here, their slow southern pace, good 
cooking and hospitality combine with ex- 
cellent fishing and related water sports of 
boating and swimming. 

In this Marshall County area housing, 
resorts, camping and recreational equip- 
ment rentals make it unnecessary to bring 
much more than the family/ Kentucky 
Lake's west 20-mile Marshall County 
shoreline is doubled by the opposite shores of 
Land Between the Lakes. It's an easy eight- 
hour drive to Marshall County, Ky. Details 
may be obtained by writing KLV, Depl. CB, 
Box 145, Benton, KY, 42025, or calling (502) 
527-7665. 

Green County, Wis., with 91 percent of its 
land devoted to agriculture, houses the town 
of Monroe, known as the Swiss Cheese 
Capitol of the U.S. Visitors and residents are 




invited to Green County's annual $2 Dairy 
Breakfast on the Farm, featuring eggs, 
sausage plus all the trimmings and fun. 
Breakfast is held Saturday, May 31, at the 
Ladwig place, midway between Monroe and 
Albany. Serving begins at 6 a.m. Breakfast 
can be followed by a trip over Sugar River 
Trail with the bikers and hikers. The smooth 



limestone trail winds for miles over the 
beauty of treslled wooden bridges, around 
picturesque hills and beside brilliant 
meadows which make southern Wisconsin so 
famous. 

One trail access point is at New Glarus 
with its well-known Swiss Museum. Here the 
Heidi Fest, on June 28 and 29, includes old- 
world drama, yodeling, bell ringing, alphorn 
blowing, music, crafts and foods symbolic of 
its Swiss heritage. More festivity in- 
formation is available from the Green Coun- 
ty Tourism Office, Box 516-R, Monroe, WI, 
53566. They will send a colorful com- 
prehensive brochure and answer specific 
questions. 

May 18 through 24 is National Tourism 
Week and Illinois is seriously seeking the 
tourism market this year. According to Gov, 
James R. Thompson, the 1985 Illinois 
recreation industry generated $6.3 billion 



Schedule Special 
Hilton Head Tour 



A special motorcoach 
vacation which combines a 
chance to experience 
America's colonial history 
and architectural heritage 
with a stay at one of the 
country's most magnificent 
recreational complexes is 
being offered this June by On 
The Road Tours. 

The nine-day "Hilton Head 
Island k Charleston" tour 
program, priced at only $635 
per person, double oc- 
cupancy, departs Chicago 
and South Bend on- June 7, 
bound for Kentucky's 
Bluegrass Country, the 
Smoky Mountains, Savan- 
nah and Atlanta, as well as 
Charleston and Hilton Head 
Island. 

The itinerary features two 
nights in aristocratic 
Charleston, staying at the 
luxurious Mills House, rated 
three stars in the Mobil 
Guide; Charleston was the 
first American city to 
protect and preserve its ar- 
chitectural heritage, and 
many buildings predating 
the Revolutionary War are 
still in use today. Optional 
excursions to a nearby 
tidewater plantation and 
Fort Sumter will be offered. 

The Charleston stay will 
be followed by a full day at 
Hilton Head Island, a 
recreational paradise with 
12 miles of unspoiled 
beaches, n championship 



golf courses, over 175 tennis 
courts, 13 miles of bike paths 
and some of the best salt 
water fishing on the east 
coast. Tour members will 
stay at the Holiday Inn, 
located right on the beach. 

A full day in Savannah, Ga 
is also featured. Savannah is 
another city of the old south 
where graceful mansions 
and antebellum buildings 
have been. restored to their 
original grandeur. A stay at 
the four-star DeSoto Hilton 
Hotel will highlight the 
Savannah stop. 

The program also includes 
a visit to the opulent Bilt- 
more House in the Smoky 
Mountains, built in 1895 by 
George Vanderbilt to rival 
the great chateaux of the 
Loire Valley in France; a 
stop in booming Atlanta; and 
a visit to Louisville's most 
famous landmark, Churchill 
Downs, with its colorful 
museum of the Kentucky 
Derby. 

The nine-day "Hilton Head 
Island & Charleston" motor- 
coach vacation is fully 
detailed in On The Road 
Tours* new 20-page color 
brochure, which also- lists 
the operator's many other 
tour programs. 

For more information, 
contact On The Road Tours, 
P.O. Box 183, Downers 
Grove, IL. 60515. The 
telephone is (312) 852-8666. 



W% CSSS * Swtw RmSS Tlm^-YouT* IiwiUd! 




| Bom loft North I 
trovl oftcncu 



THANK YOU 
ANTIOCH 



Thanks to vour support, we are expanding our An* 
IcSh office. We Rave just installed a new airline 
computer system to serve you faster and more ^ac- 
curately. We can now do your reservations, s . e ° 
assignments and boarding passes all In one ^fast 
Sansactlon. We are looking forward to expanding 
with you In the future. The S1aff of 

. Bam Loft North Travel 

277 Bout* 171, Afitloch. Winds 60002 * P«) 395-9050 



Dells To Celebrate 
11th Balloon Ra 



Beautiful creations of 
aerial color and artistry will 
paint the skies over Wiscon- 
sin Dells on May 31 and June 
1, as over 70 balloon is ts com- 
pete in the 11th Annual Great 
Wisconsin Dells Balloon 
Rally. Competitive events 
will take place at 7 a.m. on 
both Saturday and Sunday. 
At 5 p.m. on May 31, a mass 
ascension will take place. 

This year's rally will also 
feature the Taste of Wiscon- 
sin and kickof f the 1986 fund- 
raiser for the American 
Diabetes Assn. of Madison. 

According to Tom Shep- 
pard, ' president of the 
Balloon Federation of 
America and balloon 
meister of the Great Wiscon- 
sin Dells Balloon Rally, the 



Wisconsin Dells rally is one 
of the most prestigious and 
sought after ballooning even- 
ts in the world. 

"The baUoonists like the 
strict competition of the 
race. It attracts top talent 
and makes it a challenging 
event for other com- 
petitors," says Sheppard. 
"Ballooning is a family sport 
and Wisconsin Dells is a 
great family vacation place 
to visit, so it's, an ideal 
location for a balloon rally," 
be added. 

The balloonists, who come 
from across the nation, com- 
pete for points to win the 
Wisconsin Dells rally and 
gain points to qualify for the 
U.S. Nationals. Many of the 
pilots who are flying in the 



and employed some 150,000. Recreation, con- 
servation and other life-quality factors are 
assuming added importance to the Illinois 
economy. Combining this with the state's $10 
million tourism promotion fund, promises 
new facilities for both residents and Illinois 
visitors. 

Keeping a "weather eye" open during May 
and June is good advice, according to 
weatherwatchers across the nation. In a 36- 
year study, May has the dubious distinction 
of having the most tornadoes, followed by 
June. The midwest's tornado alley can 
produce no-warning touchdown areas, or 
have warnings that vary from 20 minutes to 
an hour, stemming from various National 
and Local Weather Watch services. 

Each year billions of dollars in storm 
losses are recorded, but that immeasurable 
component, human life, has a value that 
justifies a personal, watchful weather 
eye... especially in unfamiliar locales. 

Hold 'Amigo' Meeting 

Parents Without Partners of Lake County 
will host an "Amigo" meeting for single 
parents interested in learning about the club 
in Round Lake Beach from 8 to 10 p.m. on 
Wednesday, May 14. For directions and 
information, call (312) 546-5463. 

Wisconsin Dells rally will 

also be attending the North 

American Championships 

held in Barrie, Ontario in 

July. 
Several accuracy tests are 

used to determine the pilots' 

skills. The Hare and Hound 

race is a flight in which the 
"hare" sets the course ac- 
cording to air and wind 

currents. The "hounds" 

follow the same course 

utilizing skillful navigation. 

The Watership Down is a 

flight where balloonists fly 

into the field, drop a marker 

and follow a "hare" to a Ian- | 

ding area before dropping 

another marker. The pilot 

who lands his marker closest 

to the target receives the 

most points. 




u 



ALAORTH 
COUNTY 

ISCONSINS 

ONDtBl AND 



SPRING R&R VISITS 




Alzheimer's Disease 

Alzheimer's Disease will be the topic of the 
next meeting of the Hand in Hand support 
group, made up of those caring for elderly 
loved ones. The meeting will be held at 7 
p.m., Monday, May 12 at the Lake Villa 
Library. The public is invited. 



Evening At Gene's 

Non-Smokers Singles Club will meet at 
Gene's home in Grayslake on Saturday, May 
17, at 7 p.m. Bring your own beverage (no 
red wine). Will order pizzas. Cost is $1 for 
members, $2 for guests, plus the cost of the 
pizzas. Call (312) 223-5370. Reservation a 
must! 




WIN A 



FREE CRUISE 



during our 

GRAND CELEBRATION 

Receive an entry coupon for every ticket over $100 
(cruise or tour) 

MIDWEST -Drawing to be held July 1 
TRAVEL KING Call for details 

The Travel Professionals 
31 1 N. Genesee, Waukegan 



(312)336-8200 



S 

P 

R 

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AMPLE 
LAKES 

LENTIFUL 

LODGINGS 

OLLING 

TERRAIN 

NFINITE 

ACTIVITIES 



UMEROUS 

RESTAURANTS 



GATEWAY 
TO 

SOUTHERN 
WISCONSIN 




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PLAIN, FANCY OR PLUSH 

WE HAVE IT ALL 

Less than 2 hrs. away 

Mm, 

INFO. 

trnr.. 

AjtJ 



WALWORTH COUNTY 
TOURISM 

■OX 1007 
ILKHOtN. WI 33131 

visrroM iuimu 
1 BOO 345 1020 




Announces 



Group Sailing 
October 4, i986 



On 




This cruise includes: 7 nite cruise, round trip 
airfare, all meals, entertainment, port taxes 
and much, much more. 
Ascot Travel also invites all of its tour 
members to an on board cocktail party to 
meet your friends and neighbors. 

Port Of Call - Nassau, St. Thomas, St. Maarten 
and NCL's Private Island. 

Call Today, Don't Delay 

Ascot Travel 

(312)244-0110 



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How can die Joneses afford 
a week on the Gulf Coast? 

Sil down to a seafood dinner in any one of our water- 
front restaurants and the couple next to you will probably 
be from lllmols. How can they afford it? Easy. Our hotel 
and motel rates are lower right now because it's off-season. 
So a lot of your Chicago neighbors are here enjoying the 
season we call winter — although you might call it spring. 
Our sun shines bright year round. So you can play golf on 
our 1 1 courses. Eat fresh seafood. Or stroll on the beach in 
just a jacket. Our free plumcr shows you just how link it 
costs. QSend f« yours today. Then just act smug when 
your neighbors ask how you can afford it. 

Frrx to LAKELAND trmitru 
GOLF PACKAGES 6. VACATION 
PLANNER ||p 



The Sooth 1 *' 



LAKE 



N. 



Addreu 

City 



State/Zip 



Mai to: 

Or cal(601) 388400a 



, PjO. Ban 4554, Binl, MS 19531 



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$«wfiWMP»I^W 



lakeland Hewtpapfi 1 3ft 

r¥tf ^rWtfft^W'C'r-' $?; 



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Obituaries 



Mary Madden 

Funeral services for Mary 
Madden (nee Ruzicka), 80, 
an Ingleside resident for the 
past 38 years, were held on 
Saturday, May 10, at the 
K.K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home in Fox Lake (in the 
chapel on the lake). 

Mrs. Madden died on 
Thursday, May 8, at the St. 
Therse Medical Center in 
Waukegan. She was born on 
June 15, 1905 in Chicago. 

Survivors include one son, 
Donald (La Verne) Kriz of 
Ingleside; three grandsons; 
two great-grandsons; one 
great-granddaughter; and 
other relatives and friends. 

Interment was at Fox 
Lake Cemetery. 



Nellie Dykstra 

Funeral services for Nellie 
Dykstra, 70, of Lake Villa, 
were held on Saturday, May 
10, at the Ringa Funeral 
Home in Lake Villa. 

Mrs. Dykstra died on 
Thursday, May 8, at St. 
Therese Medical Center in 
Waukegan. She was born on 
Sept. 24, 1915 in the 
Netherlands, and had lived 
in the Lake Villa area for the 
past 15 years. 

Survivors include her 
children, Clare Mack of 
Chicago, Nellie (Robert) 
Carr of New Jersey and 
Jacob (Roberta) of Darien; 
seven grandchildren; and 
two great-grandchildren. 

Interment was at Mt. 
Emblem Cemetery in 
Elmhurst. 



William Ames 

Graveside services for 
William A. Ames, 66, of 
Gurnee, were held on 
Saturday, May 10, at 
Highland Memorial Park 
Cemetery in Libertyville, 

Mr. Ames died on May 5 in 
Colorado. He was born on 
May 25, 1919 in New York, 
and had been a longtime 
resident of Gurnee. He was a 
member of the Round Lake 
Community Church. 

Survivors include one 
daughter, Lydia Woolf of 
Texas; one son, Charles 
Ames of Colorado; two 
sisters; and five grand- 
children. 



Louise Warner 

Funeral services with 
Mass of Christian Burial for 
Louise Warner, 89, of Lake 
Shangri La, Bristol, were 
held on Monday, May 5 in 
Bristol. 

Mrs. 'Warner died on 
Friday, May 2, at Victory 
Memorial Hospital in 
Waukegan. She was born on 
Sept. 2, 1896 in Chicago, and 
had lived in Wisconsin since 
1959. 

Survivors include one son, 
Earl (Margaret) of Rich- 
mond; three daughters, 
Lucille Smith of Florida, 
Mary Jane (Lester) Putzler 
of Oregon and Darlyne 
(Edmund) Schmidkc of 
Lombard; one brother; 13 
grandchildren; 21 great- 
grandchildren; and three 
great great-grandchildren. 

Interment was at St. 
Scholastica Church 
Cemetery in Bristol. 



Thomas Merten 

Private funeral services 
were held for Thomas H. 
Merten, 58, of Salem. 

Mr. Merten died on 
Friday, May 2, at Memorial 
Hospital in Burlington. He 
was bom on Jan. 12, 1928 in 
Bristol, and was a lifelong 
resident or Kenosha COunty. 

Survivors include his 
widow. Norma; three sons, 
Gerald J. (Teresa) of 
Wisconsin Rapids, Thomas 
P. of Salem and Jeffrey G. of 
Salem; five daughters, 
Jacqueline (Dale) Wheeler 
of Antioch, Theresa 
(Michael) Donegan of 
Chicago, Norma Merten of 
Salem, Mary Merten of 
Antioch and Monica (Paul) 
Yocus of Antioch; four 
brothers; three sisters; 10 
grandchildren; and two 
great-grandchildren. 
Interment was private. 



Alexander Ewing 

Funeral services for 
Alexander Ewing, 96, were 
held on Wednesday, May 7, 
at the MacGillis Funeral 
Home in Round Lake. 

Mr. Ewing died on May 6 
at 'his son's home in Lin- 
denhurst. He was born on 
April 1, 1890 in Scotland, and 
had been a resident of 
Lindcnhurst since January. 

Survivors include one son, 
Andrew (Irma) of Lin- 
denhurst; one daughter, 
Janet Kasper May of 
Chicago; eight grand- 
children; and nine great- 
grandchildren. 

Interment was at Avon 
Centre Cemetery, north of 
Grayslake. 



Margaret Schvetz 

Funeral services for 
Margaret Anne Schvetz, 6, of 
Lake Villa, were held on 
Saturday, May 10, at the 
Calvary Temple Christian 
Center in Lake Villa. 

Mrs. Schvetz died on 
Thursday, May 8, at Condcll 
Memorial Hospital in 
Libertyville. She was born 
on Nov. 6, 1979 in Lake Villa, 
and had lived there all of her 
life. 

Survivors include her 
parents, Alvin and Nancy 
Schvetz; one brother; her. 
maternal grandparents, 
Thomas and Ethel Ziebel of 
Florida; her paternal 
grandparents, William and 
Pearl Schvetz of Chicago; 
and her paternal great- 
grandmother, Betty Schvetz 
of Chicago. 

Interment was at Home 
Oak Cemetery in Antioch. 



Ernest Schulze 

Memorial services for 
Ernest C. Schulze, GO, of 
Park City, were held on 
Saturday, May 10 in 
Waukegan. 

Mr. Schulze died on May 8, 
at Victory Memorial 
Hospital in Waukegan. He 
was born on Dec. 3, 1925 in 
Nebraska. He was a retired 
motel owner. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Lenore J. Schulze; three 
daughters, Kathryn L. 
Schaeffer of Iowa, Carol Ann 
Dunham of Kansas and 
Elizabeth M. Painter of 
Illinois; two sons, David of 
Murphysborough, 111. and 
Brian of Waukegan; nine 
grandchildren; one brother; 
and one sister. 

Interment was at Highland 
Memorial Park Cemetery in 
Libertyville. 



Harry Speiss 

Funeral arrangements for 
Harry C. Speiss, 65, a 
resident of Fox Lake for the 
past 10 years, were handcled 
by the K.K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home in Fox Lake 
( in the chapel on the lake) . 

Mr. Speiss died on Wed- 
nesday, May 7, at his home. 
He was born on Nov. 10, 1920 
in Wisconsin. He was a five- 
year veteran or the United 
States Army, serving during 
World War II. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Ruth E. Speiss (nee Dom- 
strom) or Fox Lake; four 
sons, John L. Speiss of Fox 
Lake, Michael W. Speiss, 
Kevin (Julie) Speiss of 
Waukegan and Jeffrey 
Speiss of Fox Lake; one 
daughter, Sharon Ann 
(Larry) Pauly of Georgia; 
two grandsons; and five 
grandaughlers. 

Robert A. Dvorak 

Private funeral services 
for Robert A. Dvorak, 41, of 
Bristol, were held on 
Saturday, May 10, at the 
Gurnee Funeral Home in 
Gurnee. 

Mr. Dvorak died on 
Wednesday, May 7, at Lake 
Forest Hospital in Lake 
Forest. He was born on May 
29, 1944 in Wisconsin. He was 
a member of Wesley Chapel 
United Methodist Church in 
Bristol. 

Survivors includchis wife, 
Barbara; one son, Jeffrey; 
four daughters, Kimbcrly, 
Dawn, Jennifer and Carrie; 
his mother, Bessie Dvorak; 
one brother; two sisters; and 
numerous nieces and 
nephews. 

Interment was at Highland 
Memorial Park Ccmtetcry 
in Libertyville. 



Robert Israel 

Funeral services for 
Robert W. Israel, 57, of 
Round Lake Beach, were 
held on Tuesday, May 13, aV 
the MacGillis Funeral Home 
in Round Lake. 

Mr. Israel died on«May 10 
at Lake Forest Hospital in 
Lake Forest. He was born on 
Jan. 26, J 929 in Missouri, and 
had been a resident of Round 
Lake Beach for the past 15 
yearsr. 

Survivors include three 
sons, William (Jenny/ of 
Antioch, Donald of Park City 
and Robert, Jr. ( Jeannic) of 
Beach Park; two daughters, 
Debra Israel of Park City 
and Edith (Stewart) Phillips 
of Mississippi; seven 
grandchildren; one brother; 
his great-aunt; and many 
other relatives and friends. 
. Burial was at Windridge 
Cemetery in Gary. 



Kenneth Johnson 

Memorial services for 
Kenneth W. Johnson, of 
Lindenhurst, were held on 
May 12 at the Ampi theatre of 
Victory Memorial Hospital 
in Waukegan. 

Mr. Johnson died on May 8 
at Victory Memorial 
Hospital. He was born on 
Aug. 28, 1920 in Connecticut. 
He had served in the United 
Stales Army during World 
Warll. 

Survivors include one 
sister; two sons, Kenneth A. 
(Mary Ellen) Johnson of 
Lindenhurst and Daniel 
Johnson of Waukegan; two 
daughters, Ruth M. 
(Donald) Collins of Beach 
Park and Tina K. (Cal) 
Campbell of Waukegan; and 
four grandsons. 



John deOlde 

Funeral services for John 
S. dcblde, 43, an Ingleside 
resident for the past nine 
years, were held on Friday, 
May 9, at the K.K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home in Fox Lake 
( in the chapel on the lake) . 

Mr. deOlde died on 
Wednesday, May 7, at 
Northwestern Memorial 
Hospital in Chicago. He was 
born on Dec. 13, 1942 in New 
York. He had served in the 
United States Navy for four 
years and was a veteran of 
the Cuban Crises. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Carol A. deOlde (nee 
Gerhardt); one son, John J. 
deOlde; one daughter, Dawn 
M. deOlde; his parents, Jan 
and Irene deOlde of New 
York; three brothersd; one 
sister; and many other 
relatives and friends. 

Burial was in New York. 

Lyle Nelson 

Private funeral services 
were held in Waukegan for 
Lyle Norman Nelson, 76, of 
Park City. 

Mr. Nelson died on May 10 
at St. Therese Medical 
Center in Waukegan. He was 
born »on Aug. 21, 1909 in 
Wisconsin. 

Survivors include one son, 
Robert Lyle (Mimi) Nelson 
of New Jersey; two 
daughters, Sharon Nelson 
and Diana L. Cassidy, both 
of Round Lake; and four 
grandchildren. 

Ralph Dimity 

Graveside rites for Ralph 
Z. Dimity, 68, of Round Lake 
Park, were held on Friday, 
May 9, at Grant Cemetery in 
Ingleside. 

Mr. Dimity died on 
Saturday, May 3, at the 
Waukegan Pavilion Nursing 
Home. He was born on May 
31, 1917 in Missouri, and had 
made his home in Round 
Lake Park for the past 17 
years. • 

Survivors include two 
daughters, Marurccn 
(Joseph) Roman of Round 
Lake Park and Charlcne 
DeVoss of Chicago; four 
grandchildren; and one 
great-granddaughter. 



LucileGray 

Funeral services for 
Lucile M. Gray, 63, an An- 
tioch resident for many 
years, were held on 
Tuesday, May 13, at the K.K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home in 
Fox Lake (in the chapel on 
the lake). 

Mrs. Gray died on 
Saturday, May 10, at St. 
Therese Hospital in 
Waukegan. She was born on 
March 18, 1923 in South 
Dakota. 

Survivors include two 
sons, Timothy (Wendy) 
Gray of Twin Lakes and 
Scott Gray of Antioch; one 
daughter, Sandy Gray of 
New York; one grandson; 
one brother; and one sister. 

Interment was at Grant 
Cemetery in Ingleside. 
Donations made to the 
family in Lucile's name will 
be deeply appreciated. 



Dlno Correa 

Mass of the Resurrection 
for Dino Correa (Tom asik), 
10, of Grayslake, was held on 
Wednesday, May 14, at St. 
Joseph's Church in Round 
Lake. 

The young boy died on 
Friday, May 9, at Condell 
Memorial Hospital in 
Libertyville. He was born on 
Oct. 29, 1975 in Chicago, and 
had made his home in 
Grayslake for the past six 
years. 

Survivors include his 
parents, John and Lucia; 
one sister; his paternal 
grandmother, Maria 
Guadalupe Correa of 
Mexico;- and his maternal 
grandparents, Juana and 
Sebastion Marquez of 
Grayslake. 

Interment was at 
Ascension Cemetery in. 
Libertyville. v 






To Fete 
15 Seniors 



During Senior Citizen 
Month, 15 Lake County 
seniors will be honored as 
outstanding senior citizens 
at a luncheon/honors 
program sponsored by the 
Lake County Council for 
Seniors. 

This annual event will be 
held at the Antioch Senior 
Center, 817 Holbek Dr., 
Antioch, on Wednesday, May 
21, beginningat 11:30a.m. 

The program will include a 
special lunch, with en- 
tertainment by Mildred Pine 
at the piano; Charles 
Youlden, yodeling; Joe 
Stepnicwski on the ac- 
cordion; and Lauretta 
Bcttis, whistling. 

Following this there will 
be the presentation of 
awards to the very special 15 
seniors: Mildred Corris, 
Helen Donohuc, Margaret 
Fincutter, Victor Gantar, 
Dick Hartman, Meda 



Jakomovich, John Koch, 
Herbert Meyer, Daisy 
Nowachek, William Oglesby. 
Louis Palka, Jean Snyder. 
Joseph Stepniewski, Andy 
Swet and Julia Wojtarowicz. 

One hundred five senior 
clubs were contacted and 
requested to nominate a 
senior to receive an award. 
The response was very good, 
making the committee's 
selection task difficult 
because all the nominated 
seniors are outstanding, 
giving so" much to other 
seniors and to the com- 
munity. 

The 12 seniors receiving 
honorable mentions are Etta 
Becker, Mary Jeanne Casey, 
Amelia Davidowtc, Kenneth 
Hatfield, Madeline Hudson, 
Irene Murphy, Charles 
Owen, Ivy Putz, Amelia 
Reidil, Ann Rezmer, Bernicc 
Rosinski and Marie Ross. 



There Are Benefits For 
L-Tryptophan Users 



Question: Is L-Tryptophan really 
beneficial for mild, chronic insomnia? 

Answer: A four month study, completed in 
Switzerland in 1984, showed considerable 
benefits for chronic insomnia patients using 
L-Tryptophan. The regime was two grams of 
L-Tryptophan per day for a three day on, 
four day off schedule. L-Tryptophan is an 
amino acid found naturally in milk products, 
tuna, turkey and peanuts. 

To receive benefits from dietary sources 
only, the diet would need to contain these 
sources on a daily basis in substantial 
quantities. If you need to follow a low-fat diet 
for a particular health condition you may not 
be able to consume enough of these foods for 
the desired tryptophan levels. Sup- 
plementary sources of this amino acid are ' 
available over the counter. 

Large doses of L-Tryptophan can interfere 
with the utilization of vitamins B-G. 
Therefore, if this product is taken routinely 
vitamin B-Complex should be added to the 
supplement program. All the B-vitamins 
work with the nervous system, and aid in 
relaxation and reduce anxiety and 
irritability. Since the B-vitamins are water 
soluable they need to be consumed con- 
tinually as they are not stored and arc lost 
with increased stress. 

Eating complex carbohydrate foods, fruit, 
vegetables and whole grains, along with the 



Pat D's 

Nutrition 

Today 



-*^~ 




Pat DeAngells is a nutrition consultant 
to American International Hospital, Zion. 
Readers with questions about the food 
and liquid they consume are invited to ad- 
dress questions to Pat D's Nutrition To- 
day, Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, 
-Grayslake, III. 60030. 

L-Tryptophan appears to increase its ef- 
fectiveness, according to Richard Wurtmn, 

Ph.D. of the Center for Brain Sciences and 
Metabolism at the Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology. Simple sugar foods (candy, 
cookies, etc.) have the opposite effect on the 
body and should be avoided, especially at 
bedtime. 

The sleep process is learned and the body 
works on a sleep/wake schedule. The body's 
sleep/wake cycle works like a clock «and 
sometimes does not match the individuals' 
needs and should be reset. In order to reset a 
cycle you need to awake one hour earlier to 
produce one hour earlier sleep time; 






1 48 La keland Newspapers 



Thursday May 15, 1966 



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• Entertainment • 



Saturday 



MORNING 



5:00 



5:15 



5:30 



5:35 
6:00 



6:05 
6:15 
6:30 



6:35 
7:00 



© AG Week 
CD CNN Headline 
News 

CD Jim & Tammy 
O Take It From Here 
[HBO) MOVIE; 'Adven- 
tures of Buckaroo Ban- 
zai: Across the 8th Di- 
mension' 

O Morning Stretch 
O Superman 
CD U.S. Farm Report 
CD Muppets 
CD Between the Lines 
O Daybreak 
O Agriculture U.S.A. 
© Hickory Hideout 
O Lassie 
O Cartoons 
CD Joy of Gardening 
CD From the Editor's 
Desk 

CD Our People los His- 
panos 

S3 Shape Up 
CD Hogan's Heroes 
O Buyer's Forum 
O Kldsworld 
O Alvln & the Chip- 
munks 

© New Zoo Revue 
© Porky Pig and 
Friends 

© Issues Unlimited 
CD Kids, Incorporated 
CD My View 
CD News 
CD Action 60s 
CD Get Smart 
O © The Wuzxles 
<CC) 

© © Snorks 
© CD Pink Panther 
and Sons (CC) 
© U.S. Farm Report 
CD Market to Market 



CD Great Space Race: 
Unlocking the Universe 
Part 2 of 4 

CD Milwaukee Ob- 
server 

CD Chicago '86 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Bobby 
Deerfield' 

(ESPN] Australian Rules 
Football '86 (RV 
7:05 CD Championship 

Wrestling 
7:30 © © Berenstain 
Bears 

© © Gummi Bears 
(CC) 

© CD Littles (CC) 
© Wild Kingdom 
CD Victory Garden 
CD It's Your Business 
CD Our People los His- 
panos 

CD Flying House 
8:00 © © Muppet Babies 
© © Smurfs 
© CD Bugs Bunny/ 
Looney Tunes Comedy 
Hour 

© Garner Ted Arms- 
trong 

CD Housemanship 
CD Tripods 
CD Gigglesnort Hotel 
CD Cinema, Cinema 
CD Romper Room 
CD Toddler's Friends 
[ESPN] Revco's World 
Class Women (R). 
8:05 CD National Geo- 
graphic Explorer 
8:30 © Minority Business 
Report 

CD Outdoor Wisconsin 
CD New Zoo Revue 
CD Kideo TV 
CD Secret Place 
[ESPN] Tennis Maga- 
zine 
9:00 O © Hulk Hogan's 
Rock 'n' Wrestling 
© CD Laff-ALymplcs 
(CC) 

© Chartando 
CD This Old House 
(CC) 

CD Motorweek 
(D Telephone Auction 
Shopping Program 



CD Sangeeta Pre- 
sents... 

CD Davey & Goliath 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'The Ice 
Pirates' 

[ESPN] Championship 
Roller Derby 

9:30 © Q Punky Brewster 
© CD Ewoks/Droids 
Adventure Hour 
© People to People 
CD Motorweek 
CD Wild America 
CD Bible Bowl 

10:00 ©©Richie Rich 

©0Alvin& the Chip- 
munks 

© The World Tomor- 
row 

CD Sneak Previews In 
Stereo. 

CD CNN Headline 
News 

CD Soul Train 
CD Ernest Angley 
CD Comedy Classics 
CD Joy Junction 
(ESPN) Mark Sosin's 
Salt Water Journal 

10:05 CD MOVIE: 'The Fight- 
ing Seabees' 

10:30© Q Dungeons and 
Dragons 
© Video Music 
Kidd Video 
© CD Super Powers 
Team: Galactic Guardi- 
ans (CC) 
© Star Games 
CD Modern Maturity 
CD Prime Time for Par- 
ents 

CD Circle Square 
[ESPN] NFL Superstars 

11:00 0© Pole Position 
© America's Top Ten 
© Mr. T 

© CD ABC Weekend 
Special: The Thousand 
Dollar Bill (CC) (R). 
CD Wall Street Week 
CD Brady Bunch 
CD Alabare 
CD Wrestling 
CD Business File 
CD Video Connection 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Home 
from the Hill' i 
(ESPN) Major League 
Baseball's Greatest 
Hits: 1967 World Ser- 
ies 

1 1:30 © © Get Along Gang 
© Spiderman 
© CD American Band- 
stand 

© MOVIE: 'G.I. Joe 
Movie' 

CD Sesame Street 
(CC) 

CD Brady Bunch 
CD Business File 
CD Solo Act 



Sunday 



MORNING 



5:00 © Bill Cosby Show 
© Superman 
CD Better Way 
CD CNN Headline 
News 
CD Our World 

5:30 © For Our Times 
© Editor's Desk 
CD Pattern lor Living 
CD The World Tomor- 
row 

CD Muppets 
CD Better Way 
[HBO) MOVIE: 'Incredi- 
ble Shrinking Woman' 

6:00 © Daybreak 

© Sunday Mass 
© Greatest Sports Le- 
gends 

CD Westbrook Hospital 
CD It Is Written 
CD America's Black 
Forum 

CD Chicago '86 (R). 
CD Jewish Jewels 
[ESPN] SportsCenter 

6:30 © Objective: Jobs 

© Couple of Wize 

Guys 

© Insight 

© Community Calen- 




HIGHLAND HOME 



GENOA CITY, WISCONSIN 

53128 



(414) 279-3345 



dar 

CD Christopher Close- 
Up 

CD Bugs Bunny and 

Friends 

CD Glory to God 

CD Jimmy Swaggart 

CD Paul Yonggi Cho 

6:45 © What's Nu? 

7:00 © Different Drum- 
mers 
© Baseball Bunch 

© Robert Schuller 

O Of Cabbages and 

Kings 

© James Kennedy 

CD CD Sesame Street 

(CC) 

CD Look In 

CD Funtastic World of 

Hanna-Barbera 

CD Divine Plan 

CD Rejoice in the Lord 

(HBO] MOVIE: 'Beat 

Street' 

[ESPN] AWA Wrestling 
7:30 © Magic Door 

© This Is the Life 

© Gamut 

© Weekend Edition 

Q Hour of Power 

CD Kenneth Copeland 

CD Peter Popoff 

CD Dr. Dekruytor 
8:00 © CBS News Sunday 

Morning 

© Sunday Worship 

© Everyman 

© CBS Sunday Morn- 
ing News 

© Vernon Jarrett: 
Face to Face 
© Mass for Shut-Ins 
CD CD Mr. Rogers' 
Neighborhood 
CD Frederick K. Price 
CD Oral Roberts 
CD Growing Years 
CD Changed Lives 
8:30 © W.V. Grant 
© Friends 
© Eyewitness Forum 
© Chicagoland Church 
Hour 

CD CD Sesame Street 
(CC) 

CD Elmbrook Church 
CD Jem 

CD Funtastic World of 
Hanna-Barbera 
CD Growing Years 
CD Uvlng Stones 
(ESPN) Action Sports of 
the 80's: Spenco 500 
Bicycle Race 
8:35 CD Andy Griffith 
9:00 © CD Jimmy Swaggart 
© Essence 
© MOVIE: 'To Be An- 
nounced' 
© Bugs Bunny 
CD Channel 12 This 
Week Part 1 
CD Superman 
CD Focus on Society 
CD Marilyn Hickey 
|HBO] Fraggle Rock 
(CC) 
9:05 CD Good News 
9:30 © Face the Nation 
© Health Matters 
© Oral Roberts 
©Jem 

CD 3-2-1, Contact (CC) 
CD Wild America (CC) 
CD This Week With 
David Brinkley 
CD Batman 
CD Focus on Society 
CD Lloyd John Ogilvie 
. (HBO) Paddington's 
Birthday Bonanza 

[ESPN] Fly Fishing With 
Joe Humphreys 
9:35 CD MOVIE: 'Shamus' 
10:00© Lee Phillip Show 
© This Week in Base- 
ball 

© Warner Saunders 
© The World Tomor- 
row 

© Rawhide 
CD Today's Special 
CD CNN Headline 
News 

CD Addams Family 
CD Robert Schuller 
CD Super Sunday 
CD The Pla.iet Earth 



t 






Quality 
Apples 



CD Monument of Faith 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'The Na- 
tural' (CC) 
[ESPN] Fishin' Hole 

10:30© Newsmakers 

© Bowling With the 

Champs 

© Don't Miss 

© Answer Is Love 

© This Week With 

David Brinkley 

CD Matinee at the Bijou 

CD Channel 12 This 

Week Part 2 

CD The Munsters 

CD Tom & Jerry 

10:45 ©Guldeposts 

11:00© The Rockford Files 
Part 2 

© City Desk 
© Maude 
© Wild, Wild West 
CD WWF Championship 
Wrestling 
CD F-Troop 
CD All-Star Wrestling 
CD Woody Wood- 
pecker 

CD Computer Applica- 
tions 

CD Annointed Word 
[ESPN] SportsCenter 

1 1:30 © Closer Look 

Q Meet the Press 
© Don Nelson Show 
© Money Works 
CD Capitol Journal 
CD Hogan's Heroes 
CD The Flintstones 
CD Wisconsin Water- 
ways 
[ESPN] Speedweek 

11:35 CD Auto Racing: 
Charlotte Grand Prix 
Live. 

WEEKDAYS 

MORNING 



WaucoM 
Orchards 



Open Year 'Round 
10:00 A.M. • 5:00 P.M. 



Ellen Dlerker 

Marketing Manager 



5:00 © Bill Cosby Show 
© Roy Rogers 
© Varied Programs 
CD Ag-Day 

CD CNN Headline 
News 

CD Voyage to the Bot- 
tom of the Sea 
CD Jim & Tammy 
[ESPN] Aerobics; Bod- 
ies in Motion 

5:30 Q CD Morning Stretch 
© Sally Jessy Raphael 
© CBS Early Morning 
News 

© 20 Minute Workout 
© Faith Twenty 
CD SuperStation Fun- 
time 

CD Varied Programs 
CD Great Space Coas- 
ter 

[ESPN] Nation's Busi- 
ness Today 

6:00 © Daybreak 

© Dave Baum Today 
© CBS Morning News 
© CD ABC News This 
Morning (CC) 
© Muppets 
CD CD Farm Day 
CD Great Space Coas- 
ter 

CD Informacion 26 
CD News 
CD Shape Up 

6:15 CD CD Weather 
CD News 

6:30 © CBS Early Morning 
News 

© © NBC News at 
Sunrise 
© M.A.S.K. 

CD Nightly Business 

Report 

CD 3-2-1, Contact (CC) 

CD ABC News This 

Morning 

CD The Flintstones 

CD El Club 700 

CD Woody Wood- 
pecker 

CD Varied Programs 
'[ESPN] Nation's Busi- 
ness Today 
6:35 CD The Flintstones 
6:45 CD News 

CD Hatha Yoga 
7:00 © CBS Morning News 

© Q Today 

© CD Good Morning 

America (CC) 

Q Bozo Show 

CD Sesame Street 

(CC) 

CD Wild, Wild World of 

Animals 

CD M.A.S.K. 

CD El Ministerlo de 

Jimmy Swaggart Pre- 

senta 



CD Tom & Jerry 
7:05 CD I Dream of Jeannie 
7:15 CD Varied Programs 
7:30 CD Sesame Street 
(CC) 

CD Jayce and the 
Wheeled Warriors 
CD Richard Roberts 
Show 

CD The Flintstones 
CD Success *n Life 
7:35 CD Bewitched 
8:00 © $25,000 Pyramid 
CD Mr. Rogers' Neigh- 
borhood 
CD Heathcliff 
CD GoBots 

CD Something Beauti- 
ful 
8:05 CD Hazel 
8:15 CD Weather 
8:30 © Sally Jessy Raphael 
© Beverly Hillbillies 
CD Polka Dot Door 
CD Mr. Rogers' Neigh- 
borhood 
CD Scooby Doo 
CD Jimmy Swaggart 
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CD Instructional Pro- 
grams 
8:35 CD I Love Lucy 
9:00 © Donahue 

© Family Ties 
© The Young and the 
Restless 

© Oprah Winfrey 
Show 

© Waltons 
CD Hooked on Aero- 
bics 

CD Sesame Street 
(CC) 

CD All My Children 
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[ESPN] Varied Pro- 
grams 
9:05 CD Varied Programs 
9:30 © Headline Chasers 

8 Sale of the Century 
CD Varied Programs 
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ers 

CD 1 Love Lucy 
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10:00 8 $25,000 Pyramid 
© © Wheel of For- 
tune 

© Price Is Right 
O CD Lifestyles of the 
Rich and Famous 
© Big Valley 
CD Mr. Rogers' Neigh- 
borhood 
CD Local News 
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10:15 CD Most Active Stocks 
10:30 8 The New Card 
Sharks 

© © Scrabble 
© CD New Love Amer- 
ican Style 

CD Reading Rainbow 
(CC) 

CD Jimmy Swaggart 
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11:00 Q Press Your Luck 
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CD Instructional Pro- 
grams 

CD Tic Tac Dough 
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grams 

[ESPN] Aerobics: Bod- 
ies in Motion 
11:05 CD Perry Mason 
11:15 CD Most Active Stocks 
11:30 8 The Young and the 
Restless 

© Search for Tomor- 
row (CC) 
© Loving 

CD CD Sesame Street 
(CC) 

CD Joker's Wild 
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AFTERNOON 

12:00© © Days of Our 
Lives 

Q © CD News 
© All My Children 
CD Andy Griffith 
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CD CD Varied Pro- 
grams 



12:05 CD Varied Programs 
12:20 CD Ask an Expert 
12:30 8 © As the World 
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CD Mr. Rogers' Neigh- 
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CD 3-2-1, Contact (CC) 
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1:00 © Santa Barbara 
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© CD One Life to Live 

© Dick Van Dyke 
CD CD Varied Pro- 
grams 

CD Ask an Expert 
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grams 

1:30 8 © Capitol 
© Carol Burnett 
CD Hooked on Aero- 
bics 

CD Lost in Space 
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2:00 © © The Guiding 
Light 

© Love Connection 
© Santa Barbara 
© CD General Hospi- 
tal 

© Andy Griffith 
GD Varied Programs 
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2:30 © Let's Make a Deal 
© Scooby Doo 
CD Muppets 
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CD Woody Wood- 
pecker 

[ESPN] Varied Pro- 
grams 

3:00 © Price Is Right 
© Jeopardy 
© New Newlywed 
Game 

© One Day at a Time 
© Best of Family Feud 
© Heathcliff 
CD Wild, Wild World of 
Animals 

CD Hour Magazine 
CD Challenge of the 
Gobots 

CD The Flintstones 
3:05 © The Flintstones 

3:30 © Little House on the 
Prairie 

© Love Connection 
© Too Close for Com- 
fort 

© Jeopardy 
© Transformers 
CD Today's Special 
© Mr. Rogers' Neigh- 
borhood 
CD G.I. Joe 
CD 700 Club 
CD He-Man & Masters 
of the Universe 
3:35 © The Munsters 
4:00 © Hart to Hart 
© People's Court 
Divorce Court 
©News 
© G.I. Joe 

© Mr. Rogers' Neigh- 
borhood 

© Sesame Street 
(CC) 

© New Newlywed 
Game 

© Transformers 
© She Ra Princess of 
Power 
4:05 © Leave It to Beaver 
4:30 © People's Court 
©News 
© Jeffersons 
© Laverne and Shirley 
© Sesame Street 
(CC) 

©$100,000 Pyramid 
© The Jetsons 
CD Thundercats 
CD Varied Programs 
4:35 © Beverly Hillbillies 
5:00 ©©©©News 
© Good Times 
© Wild, Wild World of 
Animals 
© M«A«S*H 
© Diff'rent Strokes 
CD Novela: Las Ama- 
zonas 

© What's Happening!! 
5:05 © Andy Griffith 
5:30 © CBS News 
© NBC News 
NBC Nightly News 
© © ABC News 
© Jeffersons (CC) 
©3-2-1, Contact (CC) 
© MacNeil-Lehrer 
Newshour 

© Leave It to Beaver 
CD Diff'rent Strokes 



• specials • 



THURSDAY 
5/15/86 
3:00PM [HBO] — The 
Special Magic of 
Herself the Elf 
Herself the Elf 
comes to the res- 
cue when a bird 
forgets its song. 

11:30PM© — Wartime in 
Washington (CC) 

America's entry 
into World War II 
altered the city of 
Washington, D.C. 
from a quiet town 
to a bustling me- 
tropotis. 

FRIDAY 
5/16/86 

9:00PM [HBO] — On 
Location: Howie 
Mandel Howie 
Mandel's unique 
comic style is 
showcased in his 
outrageous night- 
club act. (60 
min.) 

SATURDAY 
5/17/86 

8:00PM O CD — Dom 
DeLuise and 

Friends Part IV 

Loni Anderson, 
Dean Martin, Joan 
Van Ark and Red 
Buttons join Dom 
Detuise for an ev- 
ening ot comedy 
sketches. (60 
min.) 
9:00PM 03 — Passion and 
Memory (CC) 
Robert Guillaume 
hosts this profile 
of live well-known 
black actors and 
actresses. (60 
min.) 
[HBO] — Standing , 
Room Only: Liza 
In London Liza 
Minnelli performs 
lor a sold-out 
crowd at the Lon- 
don Palladium. 
(90 min.) 

SUNDAY 
5/18/86 

8:00PM (D — National 
Geographic Spe- 
cial: Chesapeake 
Borne (CC) The 
Chesapeake Bay 
and the people 
who live on its 
shores are fea- 
tured. (60 min.) 
9:00PM ID — Cathedral 
Live action and 
animation com- 
bine to tell the 
story of the build- 
ing of a French 
cathedral. (60 
min.) 

TUESDAY 
5/20/86 

/:00PM O — Flint- 
stones' 25th An- 
niversary Cele- 
bration Tim Con- 
way and Harvey 
Korman host the 
25th anniversary 
of television's first 
animated situa- 
tion comedy. (60 
min.) 

WEDNESDAY 
5/21/86 

9:00PM CO — Sharks In a 
look at sharks as 
cold-blooded kill- 
ers, this programs 
asks, 'is it true?,' 
'why do they 
strike with such 
ferociousness' 
and 'what is the 
average life of a 
killer shark?' (60 
min.) 



Come.. .Step Backwards In Time Into 

An Old World Of Yesterday 
at Wadcokda Orchards 



COUNTRY STORE 
Dlsllncllve Gilts, Antiques and Many Other Goodies. 

APPLE KITCHEN 
A complete Colloo Shop Including Old Fashion fco Croom Bar. 

ANTIQUE BARN 
Antique Items aplenty rekindling memories of yesterdays'. 

CIDER MILL 
Cider In the making is almost as much fun as the lasting. 

CHEESE FACTORY 
For quality Cheese & Sausage, Gilt Boxes & Baskets. 

GREENHOUSE • BERRIES • WINES 

Thin Ait FOUR SEASONS ol Fun ind Inlnatl it WAUCONDA ORCHARDS 

1201 GossbII RrJ. • Wauconda, IL 60084 • 312/526-8553 



PAT'S 



PIZZA & SANDWICHES 



DINING -ROOK/- DELIVERY 



Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 



719 BARRON BLVD. (RT. 83) GRAYSLAKE. 
223-PAT'S 



Lakeland Newspapers 1C 



*«(^«**«TjBW)i»wi3B3rw**»*a»^ 




a» »J.«.^ « < -rtfM. | Tllll««l.»tl 



■ 



MARVIN W. HEATH 



M. W, Heath 8 Son 
Vinyl Replacement Windows 



The Security 
of Steel 
Yours with a 



STANLEY 



STia REPLACEMENT DOOR 




OFFICE 
(312)395-0638 



42513RINEARRD. 
ANTIOCH.IL 60002 



1 1 
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ANTIOCH TIRE, INC 

115 Rt. 173 — AntiochJL 
(312)395-2345 




115 Rl. 173 
Antloch. IL 



Cooper 

TIRES 



At Your Service.. . 

• PASSENGER TIRES 

• TRUCK TIRES 

• COMPUTERIZED 
WHEEL BALANCING 

• FRONT END 
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• COMPLETE BRAKE 

SERVICE 

• SHOCK ABSORBERS 

• MUFFLER SERVICE 

• BATTERIES 

John & Tony Lavollo 
Proprietors 



* 90 Day Same As Cash 

* No Annual Membership 





THURSDAY 

5/15/86 

EVENING 

6:00 O O O CB 
News 

O Barney Miller 
CD Hooked on Aero- 
bics 

CD Three's Company 
G3 Informacion 26 
€D Gimme a Break 
€0 Growing Years 
[ESPNI SportsCenter 

6:30 O O Wheel of For- 
tune 

CD Entertainment 
Tonight 

O $1,000,000 

Chance of a Lifetime 
Bob Newhart 
ID MacNeil-Lehrer 
Newshour 

CD Chicago Tonight 
CD Three's Company 
S3 Canasta de Cuentos 
€S Major League Base- 
ball: Chicago White Sox 
at New York Yankees 
€D Principles of Ac- 
counting 
€D CNN News 
(HBO] MOVIE: "Incredi- 
ble Shrinking Woman' 
[ESPN] Speedweek 
6:35 CD Sanford and Son 
7:00 © Simon & Simon 
(R). 

O O Cosby Show 
(CC) In Stereo. 
O CD Ripley's Believe 
It or Not! (CC) (R). 

MOVIE: 'All That 
Jazz* 

CD Heart of the Dra- 
gon: Marrying (CC) (R). 
CD The Bowling Game 
Q3 Novela: La Duena 
€0 Pacific Profiles 
QD Decade of Victory 

1 Oth Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
(ESPN| Auto Racing 
'86: IHRA Drag Racing- 
Pro AM Nationals 

7:05 CD MOVIE: 'Fast Break' 
7:30 O Family Ties (Ft). 
In Stereo. 

CD Profiles of Nature 
S3 Focus on Society 
8:00 OO Bridges lo Cross 
O0 Cheers Part 3 of 
3 In Stereo. 
O CD Colbys (CC) 
CD Nature: The 
Gooneys of Midway 
<CC) In Stereo, 
CD Wild America 
CD MOVIE: 'Butch Cas- 
sidy and the Sundance 
Kid* 

63 Novela: Carmin 
€0 David Sussktnd 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Angel' 
(ESPN) Top Rank Box- 
ing from Merrillville, IN 
Live, 
8:30 O Night Court (R), 
In Stereo. 

CD Sneak Previews 
9:00 O Knots Landing 
(CC) 

O Hill Street Blues 
(R). 

O CD 20/20 (CC) 
CD Outdoor Wisconsin 
CD Mystery!: Agatha 
Christie's Partners in 
Crime (CC) 
€D Ayuda! 
03 Nightly Business 



Report 
9:20 CD MOVIE: 'Biggest 

Bundle of Them All' 
9:30 News 

CD Motorweek 

CD The Honeymooners 
03 Venita Van Caspel 
[HBO] Not Necessarily 
the News 

10:00 O O CD 
News 

CD Bless Me, Father 
CD Nightly Business 
Report 

S3 Informacion 26 
CD M»A«S»H 
63 Hatha Yoga 
CD Decade of Victory 
1 Oth Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
(H80) Philip Marlowe, 
Private Eye: Pickup on 
Noon Street 

10:15 CD Benny Kill Show 

10:30 Night Heat 

O Trapper John, 
M.D. 

Tonight Show In 
Stereo. 
Benson 

ABC News Nightline 
CD Nova: The Magic of 
Special Effects (CC) 
(R). 

CD MOVIE: 'High Noon' 
CD M«A»S*H 
CD Tonight Show 
€D Novela: Cristina Ka- 
zan 

CD Starsky and Hutch 
S3 Communication 
Skills 
(ESPN] SportsCenter 

11:00 Police Story 

O MOVIE: 'Kings Go 

Forth' 

(B Odd Couple 

(HBO) MOVIE: 'Nickel 

Mountain* 

(ESPNJ NFL Superstars 

11:30 O Late Night with 
David Letterman In 
Stereo. 

MOVIE: 'The Big 
Red One* 

CD Wartime in Wash- 
ington (CC) 
CD ABC News Nightline 
CD All in the Family 
S3 Gene Scott 
CD Mission: Impossible 
[ESPN] Fishin" Hole 



FRIDAY 
5/16/86 



EVENING 




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6:00 O O O O O CD 
News 

Barney Miller 
CD Hooked on Aero- 
bics 

CD Three's Company 
S3 Informacion 26 
CD Gimme a Break 
CD Marketing Perspec- 
tives 

€D Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
(ESPN] SportsCenter 

6:30 O O Wheel of For- 
tune 

CD Entertainment 
Tonight 

O $1,000,000 

Chance of a Lifetime 
Bob Newhart 
CD MacNeil-Lehrer 
Newshour 

CD Chicago Tonight 
CD CD Three's Com- 



pany 

S3 Canasta de Cuentos 
S3 Business of Man- 
agement 
CD CNN News 
(ESPN] Historic Indian- 
polls 500 Films' 
7:00 O O Charlie & 
Company (CC) 
O MOVIE: 'The Return 
of the King' 
Knight Rider (R), In 
Stereo. 
O CD Webster (CC) 

(R). 

Odd Couple 

CD Washington Week 

in Review (CC) 

CD The Bawling Game 

S3 Novela: La Duena 

CD PM Magazine 

S3 Business of Man* 

agement 

CD Decade of Victory 

1 Oth Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Alamo 
Bay' 

[ESPN] NHL Hockey: 
Stanley Cup Finals Live. 

7:20 CD MOVIE; 'Castle 
Keep' 

7:30 O O Leo 8. Ur in Bev- 
erly Hills 

O CD MOVIE: 'Pol- 
tergeist' (CC) (R). 
O Major League Base- 
ball: Chicago Cubs at 
Houston 

CD CD Wall Street 
Week 

S3 The Planet Earth 
(CC) 

8:00 O O Dallas (CC) 
Last Precinct 
CD Wisconsin Maga- 
zine 
CD Chicago Week in 

R^vifiw 

CD CD MOVIE: 'God- 
zilla '85' 
S3 Novela: Carmin 

8:30 CD Fawlty Towers 

CD Bobby Jones Gos- 
pel Show 

9:00 O O Falcon Crest 
(CC) 

O O Miami Vice (R), 
In Stereo. 

CD Golden Years of 
Television 

CD An Evening of 
Championship Skating 
S3 P£LICULA: 'El Cam- 
ino del Infierno' 
S3 Nightly Business 
Report 

[HBO] On Location: 
Howie Mandel 

9:30 CD Fishin' With Orlando 
Wilson 
S3 Kathy's Kitchen 

10:00 O O O O O CD 
News 

CD Market to Market 
CD Nightly Business 
Report 

CD Night Tracks In 
Stereo. 

CD Sanford and Son 
CD M*A»S*H 
S3 Hatha Yoga 
CD Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
(HBO) MOVIE: 'Brews- 
ter's Millions' (CC) 
[ESPN] Historic Indian- 
polis 500 Films 
10:30 NBA Basketball 
Playoff Game 
O Trapper John, M.D. 
Tonight Show In 



Stereo. 

O Benson 

O ABC News Nighiline 

News 

CD Bodywatch (CC) 

SATURDAY 
5/17/86 

AFTERNOON 

12:00 O The Rockford Files 
Parti 

O Inside Look 
Positively Milwau- 
kee 

CD Nature: The 
Gooneys of Midway 
(CC) In Stereo. 
CD Maverick 
S3 El Club del Nino 
CD Comedy Classic* 
CD Personal Finance 
CD Weekend Gardener 
(ESPN] Top Rank Box- 
ing from Merrillville, IN 
(R). 

12:05 CD MOVIE: 'Flying 
Leathernecks' 

12:15 O Major League 
Baseball: Kansas City 
at Chicago White Sox 
or California at Detroit 

12:30 Maude 

O Hollywood Closeup 
CD Mr, Rogers' Neigh- 
borhood 

CD Greatest American 
Hero 



CD Pride of Place: 
Building the American 
Dream: Proud Tower* 

< CC) 

CD Cats and Dogs 

CD 69 Buck Rogers 
S3 Middle East Pro- 
gram 

S3 Under Sail 
S3 Decade of Victory 

3:30 CD Victory Garden 

S3 From a Country 
Garden 

[HBO] MOVIE: 'Mid- 
night Madness" (CC) 

4:00 O CD Preakness 
Stakes 
0FTV 

CD Masterpiece 

Theatre: By the Sword 
Divided (CC) Part 8 of 
9 

CD Rod & Reel 
CD Dukes of Hazzard 
S3 Beautiful Korea 
CD Star Trek 

S3 Woodwright's Shop 
4:05 CD Roland Martin 
4:30 Puttin' on the Hits 
CD Justin Wilson's 
Louisiana Cookin' 
S3 Kathy's Kitchen 
(ESPN] 1986 Ford Col- 
lege Cheerleading 
Championship 
4:35 CD Motorweek Illus- 
trated 
5:00 O Two on Two 
O News 
Fame 
CD Risking It All 
CD This Old House 
(CC) 

CD M'A'S'H 
CD Puttin' on the Hits 
S3 Polonia Today 
CD What's Happening 
Now 

S3 All New Painting 
Ceramics 

S3 Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
5:05 CD World Champion- 
ship Wrestling 
5:30 O O CBS News 
O CD ABC News 
CD Super Soccer 
CD Frugal Gourmet 
CD Dance Fever 
S3 Midwest Outdoors 
Limited 

CD Diff ' rent Strokes 
CD Cats and Dogs (CC) 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Sixteen 
Candles' (CC) 
(ESPN] SportsCenter 

EVENING 



COMEDY 



Your Most 

Complete 

Video Selection ! 

Downtown 

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ADULT 



WESTERN 



©"In* U 

V,| -I s5»on W 



6:30 



S3 La Hora de la Deci- s : oo 

sion 

S3 Personal Finance 

CD CNN News 

1:00 O O Golf: Colonial 
National Invitational 
O Get Rich Quick 
CD All Creatures Great 
and Small 

CD Wild America (CC) 
CD 12 O'Clock High 
S3 Chinese Spotlight 
CD Wonder Woman 
S3 New Literacy (CC) 
CD Decade of Victory 

1:30 O 20th Annual Greek- 
American Parade 
O MOVIE: 'Buck Pri- 
vates Come Home" 
CD Bodywatch 
CD Babe Winkleman's 
Good Fishing 
S3 New Uteracy (CC) 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Adven- 
tures of Buckaroo Ban- 
zai: Across the 8th Di- 
mension' 

2:00 CD Nature: The 
Gooneys of Midway 
(CC) In Stereo. 
CD Black Champions 
(CC) 

CD Laverne and Shirley 
CD Twilight Zone 
CD Battlestar Galactica 
CD Six-Gun Heroes 
CD Decade of Victory 
[ESPN] Freddie Spen- 
cer Explains Motorcy- 
cle Racing 

2:10 CD MOVIE: 'Flying Tig- 
ers' 

2:30 O NBA Basketball 
Playoff Game 
O CD Wide World of 
Sports 

CD Twilight Zone 
(ESPN] Golf: Senior 
PGA Tour Live. 

3:00 O Major League 
Baseball: New York 
Mets at Los Angeles or 
St. Louis at Atlanta 
Soul Train 



7:00 



7:05 
7:30 



8:00 



8:30 
9:00 



O O CD News 
Warner Saunders 
O Behind the Wheel 
It's a Living 
CD Sneak Previews 
CD Solid Gold 
S3 Yugoslav-American 
Show 

CD Small Wonder 
S3 Venita Van Caspel 
[ESPN] Fashion Action 
Report 

O Dance Fever 
O O Wheel of For- 
tune 

Fight Back With 
David Horowitz 
O Small Wonder 
O CD At the Movies 
CD Washington Week 
in Review (CC) 
CD McLaughlin Group 
S3 Jerry Fatwell 
CD Ted Knight Show 
63 TV Workshop 
S3 CNN News 
[ESPN] Historic Indian- 
polis 500 Films 
O O Crazy Like a Fox 
(R). 

O Gimme a Break 
(R), In Stereo. 
O CD Mr. Sunshine 
(CC) 

Odd Couple 
CD Mystery!: Agatha 
Christie's Partners in 
Crime (CC) 

CD MOVIE: 'Nicholas 
and Alexandra' 
CD Star Search 
S3 Fat Albert 
S3 German Profes- 
sional Soccer 
S3 Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'The Am- 
bassador' 
[ESPN] Fishin' Hole 
CD MOVIE: The 
Searchers' 

O Facts of Life (R), 
In Stereo. 

O CD Benson (CC) 
(R). 

Major League Base- 
ball: Chicago Cubs at 
Houston 

S3 Rock of Ages t 
CD MOVIE: 'The Return 
of the King' 
O Airwolf (R). 
O0 Golden Girls (R), 
In Stereo. 

O CD Dom DeLuise 
and Friends Part IV 
CD MOVIE: 'New Moon' 
CD Lifestyles of the 
Rich and Famous 
S3 Quest for the Kill- 
ers: The Three Valleys 
of St. Lucia (CC) 
[ESPN] Auto Racing 
'86: IMSA Monterey 
Triple Crown 
O 227 (R), In 
Stereo. 

63 Way of Deliverance 
O Magnum, P.l, 
(R). 

O Remington 
Steele (R). In Stereo. 



S CD Love Boat (CC) 
CD Start of Something 
Big 

63 Rev. Peter Popoff 
S3 Passion and Me- 
mory (CC) 

(HBO) Standing Room 
Only: Liza in London 

9:30 63 W.V. Grant, Sr. 
CD Check It Out 
(ESPN| Historic Indian* 
polls 500 Films 

9:35 CD Slam Dunk High- 
lights 

10:00 O O O O CD 
News 

CD Bless Me, Father 
CD Image Union 
CD Benny Hill Show 
63 The World Tomor- 
row 

CD MOVIE: 'Honey- 
mooners' * 
S3 Colorsounds 
CD Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
[ESPN] SportsCenter 

10:30 MOVIE: 'The Mis- 
souri Breaks' 
O O Saturday Night 
Live In Stereo. 
MOVIE: 'Airport' 
O Sports Final 
News 

CD Austin City Limits: 
Austin City Limit* Reu- 
nion Special In Stereo. 
CD Mystery): Agatha 
Christie's Partners in 
Crime (CC) 

CD MOVIE: 'The Shoo- 
tisf 

CD MOVIE: 'The Wolf 
Man' 

63 American Art 
CD Harry O 
CD Pacific Profiles 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Bache- 
lor Party' (CC) 

10:35 CD Night Tracks in 
Stereo. 

10:45 O ABC News 

11:00 MOVIE: 'Lone Wolf 
McQuade' 

63 Women in Crisis 
S3 Pacific Profiles 
[ESPN] AWA Wrestling 

11:30 Lifestyles of the 
Rich and Famous 
CD Tenko 
CD Blake's 7 
CD MTV Top 20 Video 
Countdown 

11:35 CD Night Track* In 
Stereo. 

12:00 O MTV Top 20 Video 
Countdown 

Entertainment This 
Week 

CD MOVIE: 'Franken- 
stein Meets the Wolf- 
man' 
63 Jerry Falwell 

12:20 CD Agony 

(HBO) MOVIE: 'Sixteen 
Candles' (CC) 

12:30 In Search of... 

CD MOVIE: 'Spirits of 
the Dead' 

CD Time of Deliverance 
[ESPN] Championship 
Roller Derby 

SUNDAY 
5/18/86 

AFTERNOON 

12:00 O Golf: Colonial 
National Invitational 
O Meet the Press 
Return of the Mons- 
ter Truck 

O Wall Street Journal 
Report 

MOVIE: 'Pursuit to 
Algiers' 

CD Washington Week 
in Review (CC) 
CD Adam Smith's Mo- 
ney World 



CD Star Trek 

8UT * ■«* • 

SlSS? *-* 

World Under the Sea' 
CD Yorkshire of L 
Bronte Sisters 

® e Marv,n Gorman 

IESPN] Historic Indian- 
polis 500 Films 

12:15 © .*'«■■ Thomas 
Hardy Country 

12:30 ©People of the First 
Light 

O World of Photogra- 
phy 

CD Market to Market 
CD Tony Brown's Jour- 
nal 

63 The World Tomor- 
row . 

S3 What Is History? I 7 

[HBO] MOVIE: 'To Race 
the Wind* 

IESPN] Golf: Senior 

PGA Tour Live. 

1:00 O Human Rights 
War of the Stars 
O Behind the Wheel 
CD Transplanting Hope 
CD John McLaughlin's 
One on One 
CD Blonic Woman 
S3 Town Hall 
S3 TV High School 
CD Week in Review 

1:30 O Wild, Wild World of 
Animals 

Babe Winkleman's 
Good Fishing 
O Ebony/Jet Show- 
case 

O One Step Beyond 
CD Great Perform- 
ances: Sweeney Todd 
(CC) 

S3 Without a Vision 
S3 TV High School 

2:00 O New Jersey Water- 
front Marathon 
NBC Ringside: Pa- 
zienza/Arroyo Bout 
O Major League Base- 
ball: Teams to be 
Announced " 
O Major League Base- 
ball: Chicago Cubs at 
Houston 

CD Frontline Special 
CD MOVIE: 'The Alamo* 
CD MOVIE: 'Tarzan's 
New York Adventure' 
63 Africa Report 
Tears of Famine 
CD MOVIE: 'Mogambo' 
S3 Focus on Society 
S3 Closer Look 

2:30 O NBA Basketball: 
Playoff Game 
S3 Focus on Society 
CD Young at Heart 
|HoO| Not Necessarily 
the News 

[ESPN] Auto Racing 
'86: IMSA Monterey 
Triple Crown (R). 

3:00 O NBC Ringside: Pa- 
zienza/Arroyo Bout 
Sportsworld: Star- 
ling/Bumphus Bout 

CD Great Perform- 
ances: 'Boxes' with the 
Sydney Dance Com- 
pany 

S3 Annolnted Word 
S3 Passion and Me- 
mory 

S3 Victory in Jesus 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Buddy 
System' 
3:05 CD Major League Base- 
ball: St. Louis at Atlanta 
Live. 
3:30 S3 Larry Jones 
4:00 O Sportsworld: Star- 
ling/Bumphus Bout 
CD John Butler's Oth- 
ello 



CD Firing Line 
CD Duke* of Hazzard 
63 Stan Albeck Show 
CD MOVIE: BAD. 
Cats' 

S3 Quest for the Kill- 
ers: The Three Valleys 
■ of St. Lucia (CC) 
S3 Billy Egr Ministries 
[ESPN| Auto Racing 
'86: Toyota Celebrity 
Race 

4:30 S3 Rev. W.V. Grant, Jr. 
S3 Today In Bible Pro- 
phecy 

4:59 CD MOVIE: 'Dr. Who: 
Destiny of the Daleks' 

5:00 O CBS News 

O Exciting World of 
' Speed and Beauty 
News 
Hawaii Five-0 
O CD Indianapolis 
500 Time Trials 
MOVIE: 'Money to 
Burn' 

CD Chicago Sunday Ev- 
ening Club 
CD Love Boat 
S3 Bob Lewandowski 
Show 

S3 Bluegrass Ramble 
S3 Eagles Nest 
(HBO] Fraggle Rock 
(CC) 

(ESPN) Surfing: O.P. 
Pro Surfing Champion- 
ships (R). 

5:30 O News 

O NBC Nightly 
News 

CD MOVIE: 'They Were 
Expendable' 
S3 Bobby Jones Gos- 
pel Show 

CD James Kennedy 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Incredi- 
ble Shrinking Woman' 



EVENING 



6:00 O 60 Minutes 
O Fast Copy 
O CD Disney Sunday 
Movie: Fuzzbucket 
CD Undersea World of 
Jacques Cousteau 
CD Hee Haw 
S3 Slocks, Options & 
Futures 

S3 Tony Brown's Jour- 
nal 
[ESPN] SportsCenter 

6:05 CD Best of World 
Championship Wres- 
tling 

6:30 MOVIE: 'State Fair' 
S3 Assyrians on the 
Move 

S3 America's Black 
Forum 

S3 Dave Breese Re- 
ports 

6:32 CD Newton's Apple 
(CC) 

7:00 O Murder, She 
Wrote (CC) 

O MOVIE: 'On 
Wings of Eagles' (CC) 
Part 1 of 2 In Stereo. 
O CD Disney Sunday 
Movie: Deacon Street 
Deer 

CD All Creatures Great 
and Small 

CD Pride of Place: 
Building the American 
Dream: The Garden 
and the Grid (CC) 
CD MOVIE: 'The Bark- 
leys of Broadway' 
S3 Haru No Hato 
S3 American Interests 
S3 Kenneth Copetand 
(HB0| Philip Marlowe, 
Private Eye: Guns at 
Cyrano's 

(ESPN| NHL Hockey: 
Stanley Cup Finals Live. 

7:05 CD National Geo- 
graphic Explorer 




8:30 



8:45 
9:00 



9:05 
9:15 



9:30 



9:35 
10:00 



7:30 63 Capitol Journal 
8:00 O O MOVIE: 'Stage- 
coach' (CC) 
O CD MOVIE: 'Broth- 
erhood of Justice' (CC) 
CD Masterpiece 

Theatre: By the Sword 
Divided (CC) 
CD National Geo- 
graphic Special: Chesa- 
peake Borne (CC) 
63 Grecian Spotlight 
CD Sports Writers 
63 Mechanical Univ- 
erse (CC) 
CD Jerry Falwell 
[HBO) MOVIE: 'As 
Summers Die' (CC) 
O Odd Couple 
CD Mechanical Univ- 
erse (CC) 

S3 Hellenic Theatre 
ONews 
CD Cathedral 
CD Masterpiece 

Theatre: By the Sword 
Divided (CC) 
CD Auto Racing: Win- 
tern at iona Is Drag Race 
S3 Innovation 
63 Chicago Gospel 
Hour 

CD Coors Sports Page 
CD Benny Hill Show 
63 National Greek TV 
Show 

CD Carol Burnett 
S3 Presentel 
[HBO] Not Necessarily 
the News 
CD Jerry Falwell 

OO0OOCD 

News 

O CD Tales from the 
Darkside 

CD Great Perform- 
ances: Grown Up* (CC) 
CD Monty Python's 
Flying Circus 
S3 Beautiful Korea 
CD The Honeymooners 
CD The Planet Earth 
(CC) 

CD In Touch 
(HBO) MOVIE: 'Heav- 
enly Bodies' 
[ESPN] SportsCenter 

10:25 Sports Sunday 

10:30 O Two on Two 

O The Rockford Files 

Benson 

O Sports Final 

Lou Grant 

CD Dave Allen at Large 

CD M'A'S'H 

CD MOVIE: The House 

of Fear* 

CD Mission: Impossible 

10:35 CD John Ankerberg 

10:45 Strictly Business 
O ABC News 

1 1:00 O CBS News 
Vegal 

O MOVIE: 'The French 
Connection' 
CD MOVIE: 'Dr. Who: 
The Daleks / Dead Pla- 
net" Part 1 
CD Odd Couple 
63 Sister E.R. Allen 
S3 Hurt That Does Not 
Show 

CD John Ankerberg 
(ESPN) Major League 
Baseball's Greatest 
Hits: Baseball's Unoffi- 
cial Handbook Part 2 

11:05 CD Jimmy Swaggart 

11:15 Quincy 

O Sports Machine 

11:30 Sports Machine 
O Fame 

CD Entertainment This 
Week 

63 Old Landmark 
Church 

CD Star Search 
CD In Reality 

1 1:35 (HBO] MOVIE: 'Just Tell 
Me What You Want' 

11:450 Don't Miss 



MONDAY 

5/19/86 



EVENING 



1 John — 

5 Second stringers: abbr. 

9 Glen. Nancy or Paul 
10 Article (clue to puzzle 

answer) 
12 Kelly or Prentiss 
15 Actor Hestov 
18 To be. In Paris 

20 Spoken 

21 Knight, for one 

22 — noire 

24 Barbara Bel Geddes role 

25 Scenl 
28 "Flying Cloud" 

automobile 

31 "What's My — /" 

32 Floor cover 
34 He was Bat Masterson 

36 Small Islands 

37 Badon-Baden. e.g. 
39 "The — and Only" 

41 God of thunder 

42 "And Then There Were 



DOWN 

2 Victor — 

3 Out of stock: abbr. 

4 Mark Dannlng on 
"Hotel" 

5 For men only 

6 Island school: abbr. 

7 Look out 

8 A famous diamond 
11 Vent 

13 Lawyer: abbr. 

14 Carol on "Falcon Crest" 

16 He's Trapper John 

17 A Cole 

19 Corby or Travolta 
23 Barbara, Carroll and 

Marion (clue to puzzle 
answer) 

26 Through: pre!. 

27 Assault 

29 Brennan or Heckart 

30 Expression of excited 
approval 

33 Glimpse 

35 "The — of Living . 
Dangerously" 

36 Image 

38 Italian river 

40 "— Other Lovo" 



You Can't Get There. 



oooooooo 

OO'OOOO 

Thursday May 15, 1986 



(c) 1888 Computog 



6:00 O O O O CD 
News 

O Barney Miller 
CD Hooked on Aero- 
bics 

CD Three's Company 
63 Informacion 26 
CD Gimme a Break 
CD TV High School 
IESPN] SportsCentet ; 
6:30 O O Wheel of Fir- 
tune 

CD Entertainment 
Tonight 

$1,000,000 

Chance of a Lifetime 
Bob Newhart 
CD MacNeil-Lehrer - 
Newshour 
CD Chicago Tonight 
CD 69 Three's Com- 
pany 

S3 Canasta de Cuentos 
S3 Communication 
Skills 

CD CNN News 
[HBO] Fraggle Rock 
(CC) 

[ESPN] Inside Baseball 
6:35 CD Sanford and Son 
7:00 O0Kate&Allie(R) 
O O You Again? In 
Stereo. 

O CD Hardcastle and 
McCormick (CC) (R). 
O Dempsey and Mak- 
epeace 

CD Nature: Where Ea- 
gles Fly (CC) In Stereo. 
CD The Bowling Game 
63 Novela: La Duena 
CD MOVIE: 'The Black 
Stallion' 

CD Growing Years 
CD Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
bration 

[HBO] MOVIE: 

'Gymkata' 

[ESPN] College Base- 
ball: Teams to be An- 
nounced Live. 
7:05 CD MOVIE: 'Duffy' 
7:30 OO MOVIE: 'Samari- 
tan: The Mitch Snyder 
Story' (CC) 

O Valerie In 
Slereo. 

CD Business of Wiscon- 
sin 

CD Marketing Perspec- 
tives 

8:00 O MOVIE: 'On 
Wing of Eagles' (CC) 
Part 2 of 2 In Stereo. 
O CD MOVIE: 'Johnny 
Bull' (CC) 

O Greatest American 
Hero 

CD Tenko 

CD American Play- 
house: Painting 
Churches (CC) 
CD MOVIE: 'Going in 
Style' 

63 Novela: Carmin 
63 McLaughlin Group 

8:30 63 Tony Brown's Jour- 
nal 

(HBO] MOVIE: 'Lady- 
hawke' (CC) 

9:00 ONews 

CD American Play- 
house: Painting 
Churches (CC) 
63 El Show de Johnny 
Canales 

S3 Nightly Business 
Report 

9:30 CD Medusa Challenger 
CD Better World So- 
ciety: Women for Amer- 
ica, Women for the 
World 

CD The Honeymooners 
S3 All New Painting 
Ceramic* 

1 0:00 O O O CD 
News 

O WKRP in Cincinnati 
CD Nightly Business 
Report 

CD Gunsmoke 
CD Sanford and Son 
63 Informacion 26 
CD M*A*S»H 
CD Hatha Yoga 
[ESPN] Historic Indian- 
polis 500 Films 

10:30 Remington Steele 
(R). 

O O Trapper John, 
M.D. 

Best of Carson (R), 
In Stereo. 
Benson 

O ABC News Nightline 
CD Pride of Place: 
Building the American 
Dream: The Garden 
and the Grid (CC) 
CD Sorry 
CD M*A*$'H 
CD Tonight Show 
63 Novela: Cristina Ba- 
ran 

CD Starsky and Hutch 
63 Principles of Ac- 
counting 
[ESPNI SportsCenter 

TUESDAY \ 
5/20/86 

EVENING 

6:00 O O O CD 
News 

O Barney Miller 
CD Hooked on Aero- 
bics 

CD Three's Company 
S3 Informacion 26 
CD Gimme a Break 
63 Growing Years 
[ESPN| SportsCenter 




Without Starting Here 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Far Information, 

(312) 223-8161 



6:30 O O Wheel of For- 
tune 

CD Entertainment 
Tonight 

$1,000,000 

Chance of a Lifetime 
O Major League Base- 
ball: Chicago Cubs at 
Atlanta 

CD MacNeil-Lehrer 
Newshour 
CD Chicago Tonight 
CD 69 Three's Com- 
pany 

63 Canasta de Cuentos 
S3 Principles of Ac- 
counting 
63 CNN News 
[ESPN| Historic Indian- 
polis 500 Films 
6:35 CD Major League 
Baseball: Chicago Cubs 
at Atlanta Live. 
7:00 O Flintstones' 
25th Anniversary Cele- 
bration 

O The A-Team 
(CC) (R). 

O CD Who's the Boss? 
(CC) Part 1 of 2 (R). 
CD Nova: Tornadol 
(CC) (R). 

CD The Bowling Game 
63 Novela: La Duena 
CD Major League Base- 
ball: Chicago White Sox 
at Toronto 
63 Ming Garden 
CD Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
(HBO] MOVIE: 'Prime 
Risk' 

IESPN] NHL Hockey: 
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7:30 O CD Growing Pains 
(CC) (R). 

CD Milwaukee: Behind 
the Headlines 
63 Focus on Society 
8:00 OO 1986 Miss USA 
Pageant 

O Hunter (R), In 
Stereo. 

O CD Moonlighting 
(CC) 

CD Nova: Tornado! 
(CC) (R). 

CD This Old House 
(CC) 

CD MOVIE: 'Bullitt' 
63 Novela: Carmin 
63 Firing Line 
8:30 CD Frugal Gourmet 
9:00 O O Stingray In 
Stereo. 

O CD Spenser. For 
Hire (CC) 

CD CD Frontline: The 
Bloods of 'Nam (CC) 
63 Especial del Martes 
63 Nightly Business 
Report 

[HBO] Heavyweight 
Boxing Live. 
9:20 CD MOVIE: 'The Sheep- 
man' 
9:30 O News 

63 From a Country 
Garden 

10:00 O O O CD 
News 

CD Adam Smith's Mo- 
ney World 

CD Nightly Business 
Report 

63 Informacion 26 
CD M«A*S«H 
63 Hatha Yoga 
63 Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued. 
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10:30 O Simon & Simon (R). 

O O Trapper John, 

M.D. 

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CD Forever Wild 

CD Sorry 

CD M*A»S»H 

CD Tonight Show 

63 Novela: Cristina Ba- 

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CD Starsky and Hutch 

CD Communication 

Skills 

[HBO] Philip Marlowe, 

Private Eye: Guns at 

Cyrano's 

IESPN] SoortsCenter 

WEDNESDAY 

5/21/86 

EVENING 

6:00 O O O O CD 
News 

Barney Miller 
CD Hooked on Aero- 
bics 

CD Three's Company 
63 Informacion 26 
CD Gimme a Break 
63 TV High School 
[ESPNI SportsCenter 

6:30 O O Wheel of For- 
tune 

CD Entertainment 
Tonight 

$1,000,000 

Chance of a Lifetime 
Major League Base- 
ball: Chicago Cubs at 
Atlanta 

CD MacNeil-Lehrer 
Newshour 

CD Chicago Tonight 
CD CD Three's Com- 
pany 

63 Canasta de Cuentos 
63 Communication 
Skills 

63 CNN News 
IESPN) NBA Today 

6:35 CD Sanford and Son 

7:00 O West 57th 

O O Highway to 
Heaven (CC) (R). 
O CD MacGyver (CC) 
(R). 

CD Great Space Race: 
The Earth Below (CC) 
Part 3 of 4 ' 
CD The Bowling Game 
63 Novela: La Duena 
CD PM Magazine 
63 Growing Years 
63 Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
bration Continued, 
[HBO] MOVIE: 'Brews- 
ter's Millions' (CC) 
(ESPN] Auto Racing 
•86: NASCAR Winston 
500 (R). 

7:05 CD NBA Basketball: 
Playoff Game Live. 

7:30 CD This Old House 

(co 

CD Solid Gold 
63 Marketing Perspec- 
tives 
<t : oo O O MOVIE: 'Blood 
Sport' 

O MOVIE: 'Sam's 
Son' (CC) 

O CD Dynasty (CC) 
CD Great Space Race: 
The Earth Below (CC) 
Part 3 of 4 

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69 Best of Saturday 
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9:30 O News 

63 Boxeo 

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63 Informacion 26 
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63 Decade of Victory 
10th Anniversary Cele- 
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polis 500 Rims 

10:30 O NBA Basketball 
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63 Novela: Cristina Ba- 
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11:00 Police Story 

O MOVIE: 'Alcatraz: 
The Whole Shocking 
Story' Part 2 
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David Letterman In 

O MOVIE: 'The Boys 
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63 Gene Scott 
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11:45 |HB0| Standing Room 
Only: Uza in London 

12:00 MOVIE: 'The Won- 
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• SPORTS* • MOVIES* 



THURSDAY 
5/15/86 



12:35PM 



— Major 
League Baseball: 
Atlanta at Mon- 
treal Live. 



FRIDAY 
5/16/86 

4:35PM CD — Major 
League Baseball: 
St. Louis at At- 
lanta Live. 

4:40PM © — Today's Rac- 
ing Horse Racing 
Coverage. 

SATURDAY 
5/17/86 

2:30PM 



— NBA 
Basketball Play- 
off Game Cover- 
age of Eastern 
Conference Final 
Game 3 is fea- 
tured. (2 hrs., 30 
min.) 

ffi — Wide 
World of Sports 
[ESPN] — Golf: 
Senior PGA Tour 
United Hospitals 
Classic from Phi- 
ladelphia, PA. (2 
hrs.) Live. 

3:00PM O O — Major 
League Baseball: 
New York Mets at 
Los Angeles or St 
Lours at Atlanta 

4:00PM O CB — Preak- 
ness Stakes Cov- 
erage is featured 
from the Pimlico 
Race Course in 
Baltimore, MD. 
(60 min.) 



SUNDAY 
5/18/86 

2:00PM 



MONDAY 
5/19/86 

1:30PM 



TUESDAY 
5/20/86 

6:30PM I 



— NBC Ring- 
side: Pazienza/ 
Arroyo Bout Vin- 
nie Pazienza 

faces Harry Ar- 
royo in a 10- 
round lightweight 
bout from Provid- 
ence, Rl. (60 
min.) 

1 — Major 
League Baseball: 
Teams to be An- 
nounced 

— Major 
League Baseball: 
Chicago Cubs at 
Houston 



— Exhibition 
Baseball: Chicago 
White Sox at Chi- 
cago Cubs 



H — Major 
League Baseball: 
Chicago Cubs at 
Atlanta 



WEDNESDAY 
5/21/86 

6:00PM [ESPN] — Sport- 
sCenter 



6:30PM 



— Major 
League Baseball: 
Chicago Cubs at 
Atlanta 



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THURSDAY 
5/15/86 

5:O0PM [HBO] — "Massive 
Retaliation' Three 
suburban couples 
find themselves 
separated from 
their children dur- 
ing a nuclear at- 
tack. Marilyn Has- 
sett. 

7:00PM O — 'All That 
Jazz' Despite fail- 
ing health, a 
Broadway produ- 
• ' cer keeps up a 
mad pace choreo- 
graphing mtgsical 
numbers, editing 
a film and trying 
to manage his 
personal life. Roy 
Scheider, Ann 
Reinking, Jessica 
Lange. 1979. 

9:20PM (D — 'Biggest Bun- 
dle of Them All* 
Harry Price and 
his inept crew of 
amateur criminals 
kidnap Cesare 
Colli, an exiled 
American gangs- 
ter living in Italy, 
hoping to collect a 
hefty ransom. Vit- 
torio De Sica, Rob- 
ert Wagner, Ra- 
quel Welch, 

1968. 

10:30PM ID — 'High Noon* 
A small town mar- 
shall must face a 
killer he sent to 
prison five years 
earlier. Gary 

Cooper, Grace 
Kelly, Otto 

Kruger. 1952. 

FRIDAY 
5/16/86 

5:00PM [HBO] — 'Door to 
Door' A witless 
peddler is cleaned 
out by a bogus 
vacuum cleaner 
salesman, Arliss 
Howard, Ron Leib- 
man. 1984. 

Rated PG. 

7:30PM O (B - 'Pol- 
tergeist' (CC) Su- 
pernatural spirits 
haunt a peaceful 
suburban home. 
Jobeth Williams, 
Craig T. Nelson, 
Beatrice Straight. 
1982. (R). 

8:00PM CD €B — 'Godzilla 
'85' A monster 
wreaks havoc. 
Raymond Burr. 
1985. 

1 1:30PM O — 'King Rat' An 

American POW in 
Singapore tries to 
improve his condi- 
tions through 
shady dealings 
with the camp's 
guards. George 
Segal. Sir John 
Mills, Tom Court- 
ney. 1965. 
11:45PM [HBO] — 'Little 
Treasure' A strip- 
per and an ex- 
seminary student 
team up to find a 
gold mine. Margot 
Kidder, Ted Dan- 
son, Burt Lancas- 
ter. L985. Rated 
R. 

SATURDAY 
5/17/86 

9:00AM [HBO] — 'The fee 
Pirates* Space pir- 
ates join a beauti- 
ful princess in 
search of her ex- 
plorer father and 
a newly discov- 
ered source of 
much-needed 



water in a nearby 
galaxy. Robert Ur- 
ich, Mary Crosby. 
1984. Rated PG. 

10:05AM W — 'The Fighting 
Seabees' A tough 
construction fore- 
man and a navy 
man work close to 
the Japanese 
lines during World 
War ft. John 
Wayne, Susan 
Hayward, Dennis 
O'Keefe. 1944. 

11:00AM [HBO] — 'Home 
from the Hill' An 
illegitimate son 
saves his father's 
life. Robert Mit- 
chum, Eleanor 
Parker, Everett 
Sloane. 1960. 

11:30AM© — 'G.I. Joe' 
Movie' 

1 2:05PM ffi — ' Flying Leath- 
ernecks' A strict 
marine officer is 
disliked by his 
squadron, but in 
wartime he is ap- 
preciated. John 
Wayne, Robert 
Ryan, Janis 

Carter. 1951. 

1:30PM [HBO] — 'Adven- 
tures of Buckaroo 
Banzai: Across 
the 8th Dimen- 
sion' Crimefighter 
Buckaroo Banzai 
battles an inva- 
sion of aliens from 
the eighth dimen- 
sion. Peter Wetler, 
John Lithgow,. El- 
len Barkin. 1984. 
Rated PG. 

7:30 PM © — 'The Return 
' of the King' A 
Hobbit faces the 
powers of dark- 
ness as he tries to 
destroy the Ring 
of Doom. Voices 
of Orson Bean, 
John Huston, 
Roddy McDowell. 
1980. 

8:00PM CD — 'New Moon' 
A Parisienne belle 
on board ship 
gets herself in- 
volved with a pol- 
itical prisoner. Je- 
anette MacDon- 
aid. Nelson Eddy, 
Mary Boland. 
1940. 

10:00PM © — 'Honeymoon- 
ers' 

10:30PM © — 'The Missouri 
Breaks' A free- 
lance lawman is 
hired by a Mon- 
tana rancher to 
corral a horse 
thief and his gang. 
Marlon Brando, 
Jack Nicholson. 
Kathleen Lloyd. 
1976. 

11:00PM© — 'Lone Wolf 
McQuade' A mav- 
erick ranger col- 
lides with modern 
day bandits in this 
martial arts ad- 
venture set in 
Texas. Chuck Nor- 
ris. David Carra- 
dine. Barbara Car- 
rera. 1983. 

12:00AM CD — 'Franken- 
stein Meets the 
Wotfman' Man, 
cursed by turning 
into a werewolf at 
night, seeks re- 
lease. He meets 
the derelict mons- 
ter of Dr. Franken- 
stein's creation. 
Lon Chaney, llona 
Massey. 1943. 

SUNDAY 
5/18/86 

10:00AM [HBO] — 'The Na- 
lural' (CC) A 
young man leaves 
the family farm to 
pursue his dream 
of becoming a 
professional base- 
ball player. Robert 



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OPEN 7 DAYS 

MON.-FRI. 5A.M.-6P.M 

SAT. 6A.M .4P.M. 

SUN 6A.M. -2P.M. 



Redford, Robert 
Duvall. Glenn 
Close. 1984. 
Rated PG, 
12:00PM ©—'Pursuit to Al- 
giers' Holmes and 
Watson escort an 
heir to an Eastern 
throne. Basil Rath- 
bone, Nigel Bruce. 
1945. 
Q5— 'Road to Uto- 
pia' Bing and Bob 
head tor Alaska 
and a gold mine. 
Bing Crosby, Bob 
Hope, Dorothy La- 
mour. 1945. 
© — 'Around the 
World Under the 
Sea' Six scien- 
tists, all expert 
divers, travel ar- 
ound the globe 
setting up earth-' 
quake warnings 
on the floor of the 
ocean. Lloyd 

Bridges, Brian 
Kelly, Shirley Ea- 
ton. 1966. 
12:30PM [HBO] — 'To Race 
the Wind' A blind 
law student uses 
his wits and sense 
of humor to be 
treated normally. 
Steve Gutten berg, 
Randy Quaid, 
Mark L Taylor. 
1980. 
2:00PM €B — 'Mogambo' 
This romantic 
triangle is set 
against the back- 
drop .of a big 
game - hunter's 
. ranch In the 
Kenya veld. Clark 
Gable, Ava Gard- 
ner, Grace Kelly. 
1954. 

3:00PM [HBO] — 'Buddy 
System' A lonely 
kid tries to ptay 
matchmaker be- 
tween his single 
mom and a would- 
be novelist and 
gadget inventor. 
Richard Dreyfuss, 
Nancy Allen, Su- 
san Sarandon. 
1984. Rated PG. 

4:00PM © — 'B.A.D. Cats' 
A group of dare 
devil cops go un- 
dercover to prev- 
ent car theft. 
Asher Brauner, 
Steve Hanks, Jim- 
mie Walker. 

1980. 

4:59PM CD — 'Dr. Who: 
Destiny of the 
Daleks' 



5:00PM 



U — 'Money to 
Burn' A couple, 
who are separ- 
ated by the hus- 
band's imprison- 
ment, engineer a 
million-dollar 
counterfeiting 
caper. Mildred 
Natwick, E.G. 
Marshall. Cleavon 
Utile. 1973. 



8:00PM © © — 'Stage- 
coach* (CC) A div- 
erse group of peo- 
ple traveling 
through the Ari- 
zona Territory 
during the 
1 880's fears that 
their stagecoach 
will be met with an 
Apache war party. 
Willie Nelson. Kris 
Kristofferson, 
Johnny Cash. 
1986. 
1 1:00PM © — 'The French 
Connection* Two 
policemen are in- 
volved in an after- 
hours investiga- 
tion of an interna- 
tional narcotics 
ring. Gene Hack- 
man. Roy Schei- 
der, Fernando 
Rey. 1971. 

CD — "Dr. Who: The 
Daleks / Dead 
Planet' Part 1 



1 1:35PM [HBO] -'Jus! Tell 
Me What You 
Want' A wealthy 
business mag- 
nate grooms one 
of the women in 
his secretarial 
pool to become 
his mistress. Ali 
MacGraw, Alan 
King, Dina Merrill. 
1980. Rated R. 

MONDAY 

5/19/86 

1:00PM [HBO] — 'Gotcha' 
(CC) A young col- 
lege student's 
make-believe es- 
pionage game 
turns real when 
he meets a beau- 
tiful female spy. 
Anthony Edwards, 
Linda Fiorentino. 
. 1985. Rated PG- 
13. 

5:00PM [HBO] — 'Reno 
and the Doc' A 
unique relation- 
ship forms be- 
tween an eccen- 
tric ex-athlete and 
a con man, Ken- 
neth Welsh, Henry 
Ramer. 1983. 

7:00PM © — 'The Black 
Stallion' A mysti- 
cal relationship is 
formed between a 
boy and a horse 
when they are 
shipwrecked on a 
deserted island. 
Mickey Rooney, 
Kelly Reno. Teri 
Garr. 1979. 

8:00PM ©CD — 'Johnny 
Bull' (CC) When a 
lightheaded 
Cockney girl joins 
her American hus- 
band in his bleak 
mining town dur- 
ing the 1950's, 
she gains resent- 
ment from her bit- 
ter father-in-law. 
Jason Robards, 
Colleen Dewhurst. 
Suzanna Hamil- 
ton. 1986. 

10:35PM [HBO] — 'Ghost- 
busters' (CC) A 
trio of misfits 
goes into busi- 
ness to rid homes 
of evil spirits. Bill 
Murray, Dan Ayk- 
royd, Harold 

Ramis. 1983. 
Rated PG. 

11:00PM© — 'Fear on 
Trial' John Henry 
Faulk's account of 
his black-listing in 
the 1950's. 

George C. Scott, 
William Devane, 
Dorothy Triston. 
1975. 

TUESDAY 
5/20/86 

2:00PM [HBO] - 'Baby 
Blue Marine' A 
young man who 
failed Marine 
training imper- 
sonates a war 
hero. Jan-Michael 
Vincent, Glynnis 
O'Connor. 1976. 
Rated PG. 

3:30PM [HBO] — 'The Ad- 
ventures of Huck- 
leberry Finn' In 

the pre-Civil War 
South, a boy and a 
runaway slave en- 
counter danger 
and excitement 
during a trip down 
the Mississippi. 
Patrick Day, 

Samm-Art Wil- 
liams. 1985 
8:00PM CD — 'Bullitt' A 
tough, modern- 
day police detec- 
tive is involved in 
the middle of 
Mafia dealing and 
political interven- 
tion. Steve 
McQueen, Robert 
Vaughn, Jacque- 
line Bisset. 1968. 



9:20PM CD — 'The Sheep- 
man* A sheep 
owner brings his 
herd into the 
heart of cow coun- 
try, Glenn Ford, 
Shirley MacLatne, 
Leslie Nielsen. 
1958. 

11:00PM© — 'Aicatraz: 
The Whole Shock- 
ing Story* Part 1 
A portrayal of the 
youngest man 
ever sentenced to 
the notorious fed- 
eral prison and 
the decades he 
spent trying to es- 
cape. Michael 
Beck, Telly Sava- 
las. Ronny Cox. 
1980. 

11:15PM CD — 'I Love My 
...Wife' A young 
surgeon becomes 
bored with his 
wife and begins a 
series of mean- 
ingless affairs. El- 
liot Gould, Brenda 
Vaccaro. 1970. 

1 1:30PM © — 'A New Leaf 

A playboy who 
has no money 
marries an under- 
standing heiress. 
Walter Matthau, 
Elaine May. 

1971. 
[HBO] — 'The Am- 
bassador' The US 
Ambassador to Is- 
rael is confronted 
with blackmail 
and intrigue 

amidst the viol- 
ence of Mideast 
politics. Robert 
Mitchum, Ellen 
Burstyn. Rock 
Hudson, 1984. 
Rated R. 

11:40PM© — 'Lockin' to 
Gel Out' Two 
small-time con 
men head for the 
Las Vegas big 
time. Jon Voight, 
Ann-Margret. Burt 
Young. 1982. 

1 2:00AM © — 'The Cat Peo- 
ple' A Serbian le- 
gend that a race 
of women has the 
power to change 
inio panthers 
makes a girl think 
she is a panther. 
Simone Simon, 
Kent Smith, Jack 
Holt. 1942. 

WEDNESDAY 
5/21/B6 

9:05AM CD - 'A Gun in the 
House' A woman 
• shoots and kills 
an intruder and is 
prosecuted by a 
district attorney 
bent on making 
her an example. 
Sally Struthers, 
David Ackroyd, 
Dick Anthony Wil- 
liams. 1981. 

2:00PM [HBO] — 'Incredi- 
ble Shrinking 
Woman' A house- 
wile, subjected to 
the chemicals in 
aerosol sprays, 
finds herself 

shrinking last, Lily 
Tomlin, Charles 
Grodin, Ned 

Beatty, 1980. 
Rated PG. 

4:30PM [HBO] — 'Home 
from the Hill' An 
illegitimate son 
saves his father's 
life. Robert Mit- 
chum, Eleanor 
Parker. Everett 
Sloane. 1960. 

7:00PM [HBO] — 'Brews- 
ter's Millions' 
(CC) A minor 
league baseball 
player must 

spend 30 million 
dollars in 30 days 
to inherit a even 
larger sum of mo- 
ney. Richard 
Pryor. John 



Candy, Lonette 
McKee. 1985. 
Rated PG. 



8:00PM O © — 'Blood 
Sport' T.J. Hooker 
and his fellow pol- 
ice officers take 
on the assign- 
ment of traveling 
to Hawaii to pro- 
tect a U.S. Sena- 
tor and his wife, 
who are appar- 
ently being threa- 
tened by terror- 
ists. William Shat- 
ner. Heather 

Locklear, Don 
Murray. 1986. 
© © — 'Sam's 
Son' (CC) Young 
Gene Orowitz's 
special relation- 
ship with his 
father inspires 
him to become a 
champion javelin 
thrower, Timothy 
Patrick Murphy, 
Eli Wallach. Anne 
Jackson. 1983. 

10:00PM [HBO] — 'Alamo 
Bay' A small 
Texas fishing 
community is torn 
by bigotry when 
relugees arrive 
from Vietnam. Ed 
Harris, Amy Madi- 
gan. 1984. Rated 
R. 



11:00PM© — 'Alcatraz: 
The Whole Shock- 
ing Story' Part 2 
A portrayal of the 
youngest man 
ever sentenced to 
the notorious fed- 
eral prison and 
the decades he 
spent trying to es- 
cape. Michael 
Beck, Telly Sava- 
las. Ronny Cox. 
1980. 



11:30PM© — "The Boys 
From Brazil' 

Former Nazis plan 
to rise again to 
world power 

through a diaboli- 
cal scientific plot. 
Lawrence Olivier, 
Gregory Peck. 
James Mason. 
1978. 

1 2:00AM ©—'The Wonder- 
ful Country* Gun- 
running along the 
Mexico-Texas bor- 
der involves a re- 
negade American 
agent and a U.S. 
Calvary major. 
Robert Mitchum, 
Julie London. 

1959. 

12:05AM CD — 'The Mid- 
night Man' A par- 
oled murderer 
finds a job as 
night watchman 
at a small south- 
ern college and 
becomes ob- 

sessed with track- 
ing down a coed's 
killer. Burt Lan- 
caster, Susan 
Clark. Cameron 
Mitchell. 1974. 

1:00AM CD — 'Not With My 
Wife, You Don't' 
An Air Force ma- 
jor discovers that 
an old buddy is 
becoming too 
friendly with his 
neglected wile. 
Tony Curtis, Virna 
Lisi, George C. 
Scott. 1966. 

1:15AM [HBO] — 'Under 
the Volcano* An 
alcoholic ex- 

British Consul liv- 
ing in Mexico tries 
to improve his 
status while get- 
ting on with life, 
Albert Finney, 
Jacqueline Bisset, 
Anthony Andrews. 
1983. Rated R. 















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Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 



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Thursday May 15, 1986 



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Lakeland Newspaper! * 5» 



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Nix Clause If Bill Fail? 



Placed First In Contest 

Warren High School's team finished in first place ahead of Libertyville High School 
at the College of Lake County's seventh annual high school accounting contest. 

Warren Twp. High School 
Takes Accounting Title 



Warren Twp. High School 
finished in first place in the 
College of Lake County 
Seventh Annual High School 
Accounting Contest. 

Participation in the event 
has grown to 19 schools and 
234 first and second year 
accounting students, ac- 
cording to Don Holland, 
associate dean of the 
business division. 

The top five high schools in 
the first year competition 
were: Warren, Libertyville, 
North Chicago, Deerfield 
and Antioch. 

The 10 individual winners 
for first year students were: 
Mike Mathys, Warren; Kim 
Abel, Johnsburg; Mark 
Rogala, Antioch; Cindy 
Richter, Libertyville; Carrie 
Scheskie, Antioch; Chris 
Cuilla, Warren; Katricia 
Johnson. North Chicago; 
Jeri Rutler, North Chicago; 
Shelley Tannenbaum, 
Deerfield; and IngeSchickc. 
Warren. 

In the second year com- 
petition the top 10 individual 
winners and their schools 
were: Melissa Gaspers, 
Wauconda; Jeffrey Smith. 
Wauconda; Jenni Behm, 
Mundelein; a three-way tie 
for fourlh place, Julie 
Evans, Libertyville; Tracey 
Shaw. Warren; and Jeff 
Straulin. Johnsburg; Scott 
Weintroub, Stevenson; 
Cindy King, Libertyville; 
Gina Race, Carmcl; and a 
three-way tie for 10th place, 
Rob Gilbert, Libertyville; 
John Bock, Warren; and 
Chris Laubach, Wauconda. 

Sherman 
Receives 
Award 

Doug Sherman, 

geology/oceanography in- 
structor at the College of 
Lake County (CLC), 
Grayslake, has been selec- 
ted as the college's out- 
standing faculty member. 
Michael Smith, president of 
the CLC Student Senate, 
presented Sherman with an 
inscribed plaque which will 
hang in the college board 
room. 

The selection process is 
.based on student 
nominations, supporting 
statements from associate 
deans and a statement of 
philosophy submitted by the 
instructor. 

The selection of CLC's out- 
standing faculty member is 
part of a state-wide selection 
for Illinois' outstanding 
faculty member. 

Sherman has been 
nominated for the state 
award. 



The top five schools 
received a plaque. The top 10 
individual winners in each 
category were trophies. The 
top five scorers at each 
school were presented with 
ribbons and certificates of 



participation were given to 
all entrants. 

"This contest is an 
example of the commitment 
to quality accounting 
education by the college,* 1 
according to Holland. 



by GLORIA DAVIS 

As the raise of the drinking age con- 
troversy continues to flame, one fact seeems 
to have escaped many of the headlines,- 

According to a representative of the Wis. 
Dept. of Transportation, if the drinking age 
raise does not go through at the special 
session starting May 21(an extension of the 
last session of the legislature) and it does 
pass in the future, the grandfather clause 
allowing present 19-21-year-olds to keep their 
drinking privileges can not be invoked. 

This means that if the age raise bill fails to 
pass at the special session and is brought up 
in future legislative sessions and passed, 
there will be no drinking for anyone under 21 
from the date the law becomes ef ff ective. 

There is a concertive effort taking place in 
Madison to see that the bill to be presented at 
the upcoming special legislative session is 
worded correctly, since many of the states 
that have already adhered to the 21-year-old 
law did not comply with all the required 
federal regulations. 

Gil Meisgeier, president of the Kenosha 
County Tavern League, is calling on Wiscon- 
sin bar owners to close their bars and travel 
to Madison on Wednesday, May 21, the day 
the legislature is due to vole on raising 



Wisconsin's drinking age to 21. 

Meisgeier, owns two Salem Twp, bars, 
both located on Hwy. 83 in the five-mile area 
between Hwy. 50 and the Illinois border, 
known as "Slaughter Alley", in the early 
1960s after Illinois raised its drinking age. 

In -reiterating the tavern league's 
statements that raising the age will not 
decrease teen drunk-driving, Meisgeier 
said that he has statistics showing that states 
that have raised the drinking age have had 

an increase in youthful- drinking-driving 
arrests. 

He added that stats from mid-Uinois coun- 
ties, where teens cannot reach a drinking 
border, have also had a raise in open in-, 
toxicant and transporting intoxicants arrests 
in an area where they should not be able to 
purchase them. 

Contrary to Meisgeier's numbers, 
Lakeland Newspapers two years after the 
Illinois raise, called three law enforcement 
agencies in the same Illinois area and found 
claims of a 30 percent decrease in youthful 
drunken driving arrests and also a con- 
siderable decrease in teen deaths and in- 
juries caused by alcohol-related accidents. 



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money on a satellite receive dish you 
should learn the facts. 

This year popular premium services 
like HHO and Cinemas will begin 
scrambling their signals with highly 
sophisticated electronic encryption 
devices. 

And this new technique won't he 



limited to just premium services. 
Mam basic cable channels like l-SPN. 
MTV and CNN have announced their 
intentions to scramble senilis. 

What dot^ this mean for 
satellite dish owners? 

In addition to paying several thousand 
dollars tor the purchase and installation 
of a receive dish, it will he necessarv 



tn spend hundreds of dollars on 
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This message is brought to you 
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Cable 

Let US Take You To The Stars! 

336-7200 



160 Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday May 15, 1966 



■ - w 
. - 



Neal, Cronies Leading Republicans Astray 



by JOHN STEINKE 

Recently,,! received an anonymous letter 
critical of the present Lake County 
Republican leadership, including Sheriff 
Robert H: "Mickey" Babcox, Chairman 
Robert P. Neal and Warren Twp. Supervisor 
Bob Depke. The author praised both Gret- 
chen B. Schalck and Venita L. McConnel. 
Depke. defeated Schalck for Warren Twp. 
Supervisor. McConnel lost the GOP 
nomination for Lake County Clerk. Here are 
my anonymous friend's observations: 

"Week after week I read your column. with 
great interest. You hit the nail on the head so 
many times, especially regarding "Boss Hog 
Babcox." What I don't understand is the fact 
that you don' t seem to see the Babcox/Depke 
relationship. Babcox is to Lake County as 
Depke is to Warren Twp. Yet when a decent, 



intelligent, -young woman (Gretchen B. 
Schalck) ran against Depke (for supervisor) 
to try to rid the township and the County of 
some of Babcox's spreading cancer, you saw 
fit to crucify her. 

"Venita McConnel is another one of the 
people, who stands for decency. Look what 
happened to her. She got dumped on by the 
very same cancer; a cancer she had worked 
vigorously to elect. Maybe, McConnel and 
Schalk are naive to think things wilt ever 
change in the Republican party. But they 
keep right on fighting, which gives people 
like me some hope. Many voters are decent 
and honorable people, who don't know what 
is going on in this county. As more and more 
of these people find out, these independent 
thinkers will begin to vote for more and more 
Democrats, just to give this county the 




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• ■ • 



i tics 



Staff Attends Seminar 



Lake County Museum staff 
members have participated 
in career related seminars. 
The ongoing goals to in- 
crease expertise in areas of 
Muscology will enable the 
museum to reach its 
ultimate goal 
accreditation 
American 
Museums. 



of receiving 

from the 

Assn. of 



(Catherine Hamilton-Smit- 
h, curator of special collec- 
tions of the Lake County 
Museum attended the three- 
day annual meeting of the 
Midwest Archives Con- 
ference in Chicago. Topics 
covered were computer 
related, exhibits, audio 
visual productions, oral 



history and archival collec- 
tions. 

Janet Gallimore-Smith, 
museum site manager and 
curator of collections par- 
ticipated in an educational 
program relating to con- 
servation topics. The 
seminar held at the 
Laboratory of the In- 
termuseum Conservation 
Assn., Oberlin, Ohio is one of 
two programs presented 
yearly. 

Thelma Shanks, public 
relations coordinator for the 
Lake County Forest Preser- 
ve Dist. is attending a four- 
session, weekly seminar of- 
. fered through the University . 
of Wisconsin-Madison. The 
classes cover topics relating 



to techniques for supporting 
special events, programs 
and community relations 
programs. 

Donald Strenger, 

president of the Lake County 
Forest Preserve Dist. 
stated, "The 

professionalism of the 
museum is attributed to the 
dedicated efforts of staff to 
keep abreast of latest 
technologies and practices. 
Staff members are willing to 
share their expertise and of- 
fer many fine programs for 
speaking engagements. 

"Call the museum, 
(312)526-7878 and arrange 
for a guest speaker for your 
next meeting." 



balance it sorely needs. 

"How can Neal tell us in one breath that 
Donna-Mae Litwiler is ineffective on the 
Lake County Board and a tool of the sheriff, 
and then let her control the Lake County 
clerk's office? Come on, dumb we're not! 
How can Neal say we'll punish drug dealers 
in the Lake County Republican Platform 
when (he defends his) friend Haley? 

"Two years ago, many people mistakenly 
thought that Bob Neal was going to lead the 
party in the right direction. Little did they 
realize that he would jump in bed with the 
very corrupt power that all of them were 
trying to oust! Unfortunately, no one wanted 
the job of Chairman bad enough, nor. could 
anyone muster up enough courageous 
precinct committeemen to vote for them. So 
they (the Republican precinct com- 
mitteemen) voted reluctantly to retain Neal 
as Chairman. You're on the right track 
Steinke— just keep on truckin*.— A Fan! ! ! 

Comment: To my one fan-in-the stands, 
your analysis of Lake County GOP Bob Neal 
is right on target. Neal should be the 
recipient of the Alger Hiss Award of Political 
Betrayal. On Dec. 3, 1985, Bob Neal and I 
were eyeball-to-eyeball and martini-to- 
martini at the Country Squire. He stated that 
Donna-Mae Litwiler was an ineffectual count 
board member, who would be a disaster as 
county clerk. Neal encouraged me to attack 
Litwiler as a political tool of Sheriff Babcox. 
The chairman assured me that he would 
extend support to Litwiler's primary op- 
ponent: Wauconda Village Clerk Venita L. 
McConnel. Both of us agreed that McConnel 



would win the party nomination for county 
clerk. (We were wrong.). - 

Do you know that your columnist, Dumb- 
Dumb Steinke, believed Bob Neal? My 
favorite song is: "What A Fool I Am." 
Suddenly, Chairman Neal was charac- 
terizing Babcox "as the greatest sheriff in 
the history of Lake County." Then Neal was 
the honorary chairman for Sheriff Babcox's 
political fund-raiser three days before the 
primary election. The event was utilized to 
promote Litwiler's candidacy for county 
clerk. At the same time, Neal refused to 
provide any assistance for McConnel. She 
had been a Neal loyalist, and a member of 
his political cabinet. 

In my opinion, Neal abandoned McConnel 
in order to guarantee his reelection as county 
chairman with Babcox's support. Indeed, 
Neal won a third-term as party chieftain 
without any opposition. As my late "grand- 
father used to say: "Let's look at the 
record." On April 26, 1984, William Haley of 
An tioch was convicted in a West Palm Beach 
Court of smuggling $450,000 worth of 
marijuana from Columbia to Florida. The 
Haleys area prominent Republican family in 
Antioch. On May 22, 1984, Neal sent a letter to 
the court requesting a lenient sentence for 
Haley. The court sentenced Haley to 10 years 
in prison and fined him $25,000. 

Under Neal's leadership, the Lake County 
Republican Party has gone to pot. In my 
judgement, the local party should adopt the 
following song: "Won't you come home Bill 
Haley? Won't you come home? We'll hit a 
joint for you." Why would Neal dispatch a 
message pleading for leniency for a con- 
victed drug smuggler, and then desert a 
reasonable and intelligent candidate for the 
GOP nomination for Lake County Clerk? If 
you were Lake County Republican chair- 
man, would you support a convicted dope 
pusher or a responsible party candidate? 



'Registration. Set For 
Employment Training 



Nardo Gets Annual Award 



Registration is now open 
for Catholic Charities' pre- 
employment training classes 
beginning on Tuesday, May 
27, to teach unemployed and 
underemployed persons how 

to network, complete ap- 
plications, market their 

skills and life experiences, 
prepare resumes, and han- 
dle job interviews. 



The program also offers 
access to current job leads, a 
work intern program, 
telephones, and typewriters. 

Classes meet Mondays, 
Tuesdays and Wednesdays 
from 9 a.m. to noon for four 
weeks at Catholic Charities' 
Near North Center, 721 N. La 
Salle Dr. in Chicago. 

A $1 .fee,; is required for 
each of the r l2 classes to 



cover materials and video 
taping. For registration and 
information, call (312) 266- 
6100, ext. 422, 210, 237 or 214. 



Carol Nardo, RN, com- 
munity health nurse, .Lake 
County Health Dept., was 
presented with the Illinois 
Public Health Assn. Young 
Worker of the Year Award at 
the association's annual 
meeting at the Americana 
Congress Hotel in Chicago. 

Nardo received the award 
for her leadership and com- 



mitment to the PAGES 
Program (Pregnant 
Adolescent Girls Education 
and Support Program) held 
at North Chicago Com- 
munity High School. The 
PAGES program provides 
prenatal education classes to 
pregnant teens during their 
alternative gym class. time. 
The sessions include: 



prenatal" and infant 
nutrition, labor and delivery, 
child care, safety and other 
parenting skills. 

The students are en- 
couraged to finish their 
education after their baby is 
born and are given referrals 
to area resources. Nardo 
also makes home visits to 
the clients as needed. 



^g^QttgtWS^^fS^SMISSSU^Bt^tSfff^Pfi 



KENOSHA COUNTY 





(3131 



?-*»!; 



663-3333 



,' <:■._>■■'■. 



The Antioch Police Dept. and Crime Stoppers are seeking 
information on a residential burglary which occurred 
sometime between Sunday, March 16, and Thursday mor- 
ning, March 20, in the 600 block of Hillside. 

Person or persons unknown gained entry through a patio 
door located on the southwest side of the house. Taken in the 
burglary was cash, a VCR, jewelry and a Cannon .35mm 
camera. 

If you have any information about this crime or any other 
felony crime or felony fugitive, contact Crime Stoppers at 

(312) 662-2222. 

If your. information results in an arrest and indictment, you 
will be eligible for a cash reward up to $1,000. 

The Lake County Sheriff's Dept. Warrant Division and 
Crime Stoppers are seeking information on the whereabouts 
of one Debra L. Purcell. 

She is wanted for failure to appear on charges of unlawful 
possession of a controlled substance and possession with the 
intent to deliver a controlled substance. Bond has been set at 

$65,000. 

Purcell is described as a F/W, 32 years or age, 5'6" in 
height and 190 lbs.; with brown hair and hazel eyes. Her last 
known address was 33 Riverview, Fox Lake. 

If you have any information about this crime or any other 
felony crime or felony fugitive, contact Crime Stoppers at 
(312)662-2222. 

Remember, Crime Stoppers wants your information, not 

your name. : — 

Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 



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Financing as low as 5.9% 



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Quality People. 
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-FORD 



SEE YOUR LOCAL.FORD DEALER. 









i 



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Lakeland Newspapen 1 7B 



■"*. i t ^* ii "■) ' 



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— -- WJ5J. M ^« <i n iii i mi F i iW ri *^ ^ 



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I 




Perfect 



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scape— a setting in which all 
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Gardening 'experts agree 
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trasts and accents. Using 
ground covers as focal points 
to capture the viewer's atten- 



tion is an excellent way to 
brtuk up expanses of green, 
for example, without upset- 
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worked so hard to develop. 

In the revised Ortho book, 
"AH About Ground Covers." 



professional designers advise 
gardeners to look at ground 
covers with a discriminating 
eye Here are a few questions 
to consider when you arc using 
covers that drape, trail or 
climb: 



Docs a particular plant 
look best at eye level? 

• Is it better to look up or 
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• Will a plant grow well 
vertically rather than hori- 



zontally? 

Remember that most plants 
will grow in as many ways as 
you let them, and it's fun and 
exciting to watch your plants 
growth patterns when they. arc 
left to their own devices. 




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cented, Soft Colored Bushel Basket 

Good Enough 



oses Are Favorites 



:licaicly scented, softly 

jircd and perfectly shaped. 
; arc favorites in the flower 

fid, and for more reasons 
meet the eye. 

Ichind the demurely blush- 
bloom of a rose is a 

kcrhouse of a flower— a 

>ng. long-living plant that 
practically immune to injury 
jm the elements or from 
[man error. This makes the 
sc plant relatively easy to 

>w, even for inexperienced 

rdencrs. 

{Here arc a few simple guidc- 
kes to follow for planting 
>ur barefoot or container 
}se plant. Ortho's new book. 
Ml About Roses." is a useful 
lidc for beginning planters. 

How does your 
rose garden grow? 

Your rose plant loves sun- 

|ght and water, so the wise 

irdcncr picks a site where 

ic plant will receive at least 

IX hours of morning sunlight. 

|nd preferably a day's worth. 

Plant your bush away from 

>rgc trees or shrubs, which 

fompele with the plant for 

tatcr and other nutrients and 

block sunlight. 

f Rose plants love water as 
luch as sunlight, but they 
lon't like standing around in 
Ihe water hours on end, so 
>ick a site that has adequate 
Irainagc or alter the site by 
terracing or building a raised 

:d. 

"Prep" work 

Roses aren't very picky 
ibout soil; but they do best in 



loamy soil with high humus 
content. Here is a "recipe" for 
an ideal soil, included in 
Ortho's new book: 

5 parts (by volume) loamy 
soil; 

4 parts organic matter, such 
as compost, leaf mold, dehy- 
drated cow manure, peat moss 
or shredded bark (available at 
garden centers); 

I part builder's sand. 

Now dig holes 14 to 26 
inches wide and 12 to 25 
inches deep. For a containet 
plant, the hole should be sev- 
eral inches wider and deeper 
than the container. 

Work the growing medium 
you prepared into the soil you 
have dug out. Some experts 
advise preparing the soil area 
three to six months in advance, 
according to "All About 
Roses." 

Now that the groundwork 
is finished, you arc almost 
ready to plant. There is just 
one more stage in the prepa- 
ration process. 

Start out right 

Some plants dry out after 
storage and shipping to the 
retail outlet or mail-order 
house. To ensure the best pos- 
sible start for your barefoot 

plant, cither bury the roots 
and plant tops in wet peat 
moss for several days or bat he 
your plant overnight. 

Then prune or cut the stems 
about l A inch from the bud. 
You might also trim the roots 
to reveal the underlying white 
tissue. 



One, two, three, plant! 

Into the ground they go! 
Shape the soil in the hole intc 
the shape of a cone and spread 
the root system of your rose 
plant over it. The bud union 
or knobby area above the 
roots and below the stem of 
your plant should rest two 
inches below the soil. 

Loosely cover the plant with 
2/ J of the soil, add water and 
then pack the remaining soil 
around the plant until it cov- 
ers 2/3 of the plant. 

This natural earth barrier 
protects the plant from the 
elements. After the plant has 
grown a few inches, remove 
the mound. 

To plant a container rose, 
remove it from the container, 
place the rose in the hole, fill 
in with soil and pack the soil 
down tightly. Finally, saturate 
the area with water, and mulch 
to prevent rapid drying. 

Continue to water the plant 
well. There is no need to build 
a protecting mound up around 
the plant because it has already 
grown a few inches. 

'Spring Cleanups' 

In support of the local area 
"Spring Cleanups," ARF 
Landfill Corp. in Grayslake 
will allow one dumpster to be 
disposed of at no charge to 
the surrounding villages of 
Grayslake, Mundelein, 
Libertyville, Round Lake 
and Gurnee. 




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Spreading Dense Yew Dark Green Nigra 

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Viburnums unit Prlneass Spina 

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Landscape designer available weekends 
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Hours: 6 Days A Week 

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Garden without a garden. 
Sounds crazy, doesn't it? But 
if you've got enough room 
outside for a container the size 
of a bushel basket, you have 
enough room to grow some 
pretty impressive vegetables. 

Many vegetables such as ' 
tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant 
and cauliflower do quite well , 
when grown in containers on 
balconies, terraces and patios. 
You can use almost any type 
of container — a plastic gar- 
bage pail, wooden boxes or, 
tubs, cans and so on — it 
doesn't really matter. What 
docs matter however, is that 
the container is the right depth 
for the vegetables you're in- 
tending to grow. 

According to the Ortho 
book, "All About Vegetables," 
a plant can grow successfully 
if its container has a certain 
minimum depth. Here arc 
some minimum depths rec- 
ommended by the Ortho book 
for vegetables that can be 
grown in containers: 

• 4 inches deep — lettuce, 
turnips, radishes, beets and all 
the low-growing herbs; 

• 6 inches deep — chard, 
kohlrabi, short carrots such as 
"Baby Finger" and the root 
crops listed above; 

• 8 inches deep — bush 
beans, cabbage, eggplant, 
peppers and bush cucumbers; 

• 10 inches deep — cauli- 
flower, broccoli and brusscl 
sprouts; 

• 12 inches deep — par- 



snips, salsify, long-rooted car- 
rots and tomatoes. 

Aside from depth, the other 
major considerations when 
choosing a container are porta- 
bility, fertilizing and watering. 
You will probably want to 
move your vegetable-growing 
container at some point, so 
keep it a manageable size. 
Bear in mind also that the 
more shallow a container, the 
more often it will need to be 
watered and fertilized. 

Once you've selected an ap- 
propriate container for the 
vegetables you're planning to 
grow, the next step is to ensure 
that you get a maximum yield 
for the square feel you have 
available. In other words, get 
the most out of your contain- 
ers by choosing vegetables that 
can be planted close together. 

A planting chart will tell 
you which vegetables need 
only a small space between 
them. Beets, carrots and rad- 
ishes are examples of vegeta- 
bles that require a maximum 
of just two inches between 
plants. 



Another way to get the most 
out of your small space garden 
is to select plants that grow up 
instead of out. Pole beans, for 
example, yield more per plant 
than bush beans and an up- 
right planter oflettucccan be 
the equivalent of a whole row 
in the ground. You'll also make 
good use of your space by 
growing"miniature" or "bush" 
varieties of vegetables. 

After you've selected the 

containers you want and the 

vegetables to grow in them. 

the final step is to stagger your 

plantings so you have at least 

one crop reaching maturity at 

all times during the growing 

season. For example, if you're 

working with six containers, 

plant two boxes earty in the 

season, two in the middle and 

two late. That way you should 

have just the right amount of 

vegetables at the right time. 

If you would like more in- 
formation on gardening with- 
out a garden or other aspects 
of vegetable growing, consult 
Ortho's "All About Vege- 
tables," which sells" for S5.95 
at major book chains. 



Branches Set 'Mystery Ride 1 

Branches Singles will present "Mystery Ride," Saturday, 
May 17, at Lakeside Center, 401 Country Club Rd., in Crystal 
Lake. Dress casual for this evening of dinner, dancing and 
fun, which begins at 6 p.m. All singles are invited. The charge 
is $15 per person. For more info, call Linda at (815) 455-0648, 
or Ron at (815) 459-0826. 




ANNUALS 

PERENNIALS 

& VEGGIES 

$9.95/flat 
at Synnestvedt 




Stop by and see our 
excellent assortment 
of hard-to-find and 
unusual annuals and 
perennials. Plus, we 
have a wide variety of 
clematis. 



Synnestvedt 

^Ss^ Garden Center 



Route 120 at Fairfield Rd. 
Round Lake, Illinois 

(312)546-4700 




Thursday May 15, 1986 



■-^0^Ammmhi\ 



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Green Up Time 

Shop These Reliable Businesses For Planting, 
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US Climatic Varieties Make Predictions Hard 



i 



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K * l> ¥ 



The variety of cl i matic con- 
ditions in the United States 
makes it almost impossible to 
provide an exact guide on 
what fruit trees will grow suc- 
cessfully in your area. 

At times, conditions can 
fluctuate within the same town 
or even within the same garden 
to such a great degree that 
wise gardeners plan in terms 
of microclimates. 

Your garden may have sev- 
eral microclimates. For ex- 
ample, an area with a wall that 
may be protecting your trees 
from the wind will have a 
microclimate warmer than an 
open area. 

In a northern garden this 
may help a particular tree 
bear fruit whereas in a south- 
ern garden this may cause too 
much heat. 

For detailed information, 
you should consult local nur- 
series or neighbors who could 
explain their success and fail- 
ures. However. Ortho's newly 
revised book. "All About 
Fruits & Berries." offers some 
general guidelines on what 
you may be able to grow in 
vour area. 



The broad range of climates 
in the southern states makes it 
impossible to follow one rule 
for the whole region. Although 
it is safe to say that the South is 
a favored fruit growing region, 
you should know that dam- 
age may occur in winter and 
that the hot, moist summer 
may give you trouble with 
pests and diseases. 

You may want to grow pears 
that resist fire btight, a bacte- 
rial infection that is at its 
worst in warm spring and fall 
weather, or peaches that arc 
resistant to leaf spot and 
canner. 

Tennessee and Kentucky, 
for example, are two states 
where cold winters are almost 
a certainty. 

Apples and pears will do 
well there together with plums 
and sour cherries. However, 
apricots and sweet cherries 
may not be as plentiful espe- 
cially if there's a fall or spring 
frost. 

Citrus fruits should do well 
in gardens south of Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana, but dam- 
age and loss of the more tender 
plants usually occurs on a 



The Dandelion 
Is Most Colorful 



Of the more than 25 types 
of common broadleaf weeds, 
the dandelion is the most 
colorful and one of the most 
difficult to control. This pesky 
weed appears almost over- 
night, after the first spring 
rainfall. 

Not just child's play 

Children may enjoy play- 
ing with the weed by blowing 
the plant's fragile seed pods 
into the air, but those seem- 
ingly delightful puffballs will 
wreak havoc on your lawn if 
left unchecked. 

To successfully control 
dandelions, try Ortho's new 
ready-to-usc WEED-B-GON 
Weed Killer. Today more 
people are interested in con- 
venience, so Ortho Research 
developed a rcady-to-use 
water-based formulation 
which contains the proven 
weed killers 24-D and MCPP. 

Gardening experts recom- 



mend spraying Weeds while 
they arc actively growing. One 
application of WEED-B-GON 
is usually sufficient; however, 
a repeat application may be 
required for hard-to-control 
weeds. 

When using weed killers or 
any other chemical, it is im- 
portant to know how each 
product will affect the other 
plants in your yard. WEED- 
B-GON, for example, is de- 
signed for use in lawns and 
should not be used in vegeta- 
ble gardens, flower beds, or 
around shrubs or ornamental 
plants. 

Follow instructions 

Read all directions carefully. 
This product, for example, 
should not be applied when 
temperatures arc expected to 
exceed 85°, or if you think it is 
going to rain within 24 hours 
of the initial application. 



cycle of every 10 years. Re- 
placed plants certainly can be 
fruit bearing again but you 
may have to wait a year or 
two. 

In the northern states, ex- 
tremely cold winters can seri- 



ously damage your garden. A 
lot depends though on whether 
the plant is dormant. A grow- 
ing plant is not nearly as safe 
in a cold climate as one that is 
completely dormant. Ortho's 
book, "All About Fruits and 



Berries." suggests you plant 
your garden so that the cold 
air will flow downward and 
away from the fruit trees when 
warm spring days are followed 
by extremely cold nights. 
To minimize the damage 



caused by severe north winas, 
you should put in evergrcciT 
trees as windbreaks. This is 
better than installing a fence 
because (he wind can't flow 
over the top and attck the 
trees. ■'* 




your 





t FLORAL ACHES has everything you need to Beautify your 
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Stops weeds, saves moisture. Not 
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0*THO WW PUNT FOOD 

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1 MILE S. OF ANTIOCH 

ON RT. 83 1/ 

GREENHOUSE LAWN & GARDEN CENTER FLORIST 



(312)395-1211 
(312)395-1212 

FLORIST TRANSWORLD 
DELIVERY MEMBER 



CREATIVE 
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Let Us Weed Out Your Problems 



Aerification A Power Ratting 



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Give four lawn Hit breathing room it noods to survive 

Certificates Available 




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For A FREE noubUgstfan lawn measuwmnl 
and complimentary lawn car* book call: 

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We look forward to serving you 
"Lclii* weed out your problems 

Take advantage of our 10% pre-pay men t 
special. Call for details. 




2CB Laktfand N»wspap«f» n » '- r ** -i. 



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noy«W(iaH]agKii):nain>>ni<inw<-'V'-' o~!" 



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Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 



' J •" J !- ■ i < - . ' ■ viiir*?,*,^ tVWn^>r»3W1M93JRP?*niv«;KCKB.nneain»M» 



»««g» i«a<g»«H»^^ — rjTt — _Yic-— -_- iu.-_--n.T-i -hj-^T'*' 




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n Up Time 



Shop These Reliable Businesses For Planting, 
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heaper To Grow Your Own 



Ing 



Today more than 40 million 
cople enjoy raising vegeta- 
tes in their backyards. Grow- 
your own vegetables is 
heaper than buying them at 
he Ideal market. Your own 
reduce wilt be fresher too. 
ccausc it has riot been left 
ittihg on vegetable stands. 

Plantings range in size from 
single tomato plant, grown 
[perhaps in a window box, to 
■gardens one-half acre in size or 
[even larger. 

There is one thing all gar- 
idens have in common — in- 
f sects! These plant pests come 
-in all shapes and sizes, from 



tiny aphids to inch-long cat- 
erpillars to hard-to-control 
whitcflics. All appear in your 
garden with one thought in 
mind —to devour your fresh 
vegetables. 

There arc some practical, 
effective methods for control- 
ling insects in smaller vegeta- 
ble gardens or spot treating in 
larger ones. 

Products such as Ortho 
Tomato & Vegetable Insect 
Killer, a ready-to-use formu- 
lation that requires no mixing 
or measuring, contains proven 
organic insecticides like pyre- 
thins and synergist pipcronyl 
butoxidc for quicker knock- 



down. This type of product 
may be applied right up to 
harvest time on 1 8 listed crops. 

To find out which insects' 
affect your area, check with 
your county agricultural 
agent or send for the free 
50-page booklet, "Insects and 
Diseases of Vegetables, in 
Home Gardens," Superinten- 
dent of Documents, Govern- 
ment Printing Office, Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

When using insecticides on 
vegetables, check the label to 
find the number of days before . 
harvest to stop spraying. This 
varies according to specific 
vegetables. 



WH 



The season's 

RIGHT, 

ie weather s 

RIGHT 



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Fill your yard 

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Now's the time to fill your yard with 

SPRINGCOLOR! 
Our beautyscaping experts can help you 
plan and plant a yard filled with 
spring's brightest colors. 

Leider's Garden Greenery 

On Rf. 83, 1 Mi. North Of Grayslake 
(312)223-2422 

Hours: Daily 9-7 
Sat. 9-5 
Sun. 9-5 



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May 4, 1986 to June 8, 1086. 



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OLYMPIC LATEX STAINS 

•Solid colors 
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•Dries fast— assy ctaanup ■ , 

OLYMPIC WEATHER SCREEN 

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wood 



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OLYMPIC OVERCOAT 
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Haitowback Dirt Shovel 

VmpBwt t»n ttMOt «n mi»<i np < T' h» 
Bowies itnw'ow >5l.RSSfl mur§ 

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• 25' Powerlock II 
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9^99 

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w..iw.ppoo(l «i*a dwlim fiu mW lucnr* 

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Lest mtr. mtllAn r*b*t«. .52.00 

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Woodlffe Wood 
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50! Extension Cord 

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700' Sash Cord. 

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Hook's Lumber 



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We can help. 



, 31' South Seymour 'Ave. 
■ Grayslake, 

(312) 223-8421 



*.- •* H ' r' 



Open: Mon.-Fi. 6:30 A.M.- 5:00 P.M. 

■' rl '/SaK7:0(3A.M.'IP.M. 
Closed Sunday 



Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 



Lakeland Newspapers 21B 




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n Up Time 



Shop These Reliable Businesses For Planting, 
Lawn Care And Gardening Needs 



A Good Start Is Very Im 





Get ti ng off to a good start is 
important in practically every 
aspect of life. Growing your 
first outdoor garden is no 
exception. 

When spring rolls around 
each year, gardeners from 
coast to coast begin prepara- 
tions for what they hope will 
be a successful planting year. 
But handling fledgling plants, 
vegetables, and flowers with 



tender loving" care is more 
than just a cliche — it is a 
necessity. 

Start preparing for your 
first gardening efforts at the 
ground floor. Actually, you 
must go even lower than that 
in order to care for the fragile 
root system of your plants. 

From woody shrubs to suc- 
culent annuals, root devel- 
opment is the key ingredient 



for the good fortune of out- 
door foliage. When roots do 
not grow rapidly enough, the 
rest of the plant will most 
likely suffer an untimely 
demise. 

Agronomists . have found 
that phosphorus is an effec- 
tive stimulus for root growth 
and the overall vigor of new 
plants. 




^3?fi dtf Apt Planting 

•Bedding Plants 

•Geraniums 

•Large Selection Ot Perennials 

•Blooming Hanging Baskets 

•Vegetable Plants 

Concrete Statuary And Bird 

Baths...Sizes For All Gardens 

And yards. 

COUNTRY GARDENS GREENHOUSE 

Southeast Corner Of Rts. 45 & 132 

(312)356-2033 



Hours: 

Mon .thru Friday 

8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Sat. & Sunday 

8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 




PUT A 1000 SERIES 
TRACTOR TO WORK 



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22B Lakeland Newspaper* 



Thursday May 1 5, 1 966 



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ter 375 Lake County 

ents and parents at- 

I the first Teen Leader- * 

ip Conference, held at the 

)is Beach Resort and 

ference Center on the 

tefront in Zion, , 

[Students who attended the 

inference . were from 



- 



Waukegan East and West 
High Schools, North 
Chicago, Zion-Benton, An- 
tioch, Wauconda, Round 
Lake, Grayslake, Warren, 
Grant, Liberty ville, and 
Woodland Junior High 
School. 
Agencies which also had 








Conference 



y^ 



representatives in at- 
tendance were Harrington 
Youth Services, Greenhouse, 
Lakeshore, Allendale, 
Family Service Agency and 
Cradle Society . . 

David Gates of the Family 
Counseling Service in 
Grayslake began the day's 
program with an inspiring 
keynote address setting the 
tone for the conference: 
"Searching For Answers." 

John' Chrisman, Zion 
Police Dept. liason officer 
assigned to Zton-Benton 
High School, sparked a lot of 
discussion among the young 
people with his comments 
regarding the involvement 
of music and its affects on 
people. Chrisman was the 
presenter in the workshop on 
cults and gangs. 

JoAnn Griffin of the In-^ 
Touch Program and Tony 



Lindsey of the Lake County 
Health Dept.'s Substance 
Abuse Program challenged 
the conference attendees to 
help those needing assistan- 
ce find it. 

Larnie Jones, social 
worker/case manager with 
Family Focus-"Our Place" 
in Evanston, addressed the 
topic of teen sexuality. A 
videotape presentation 
helped to highlight the need 
for responsibility. 

Sally Hauck, project coor- 
dinator of the Positive Alter- 
native Services for Students 
(PASS) Program for the 
regional superintendent of 
schools, conducted an open 
forum workshop on em- 
ployment and education. 
Jimmie Washington of the 
Private Industry Council 
covered tips on seeking em- 
ployment. 



Planning GOP Dinner 

Ronald F. Strahan (left), of Wadsworth, and Michael 
Jaroch, of Lake Villa, are co-chairmen of arrangemen- 
ts for the 1986 Campaign Dinner of the Lake County 
Republican Federation, set for 7:15 p.m., Friday, May 
16 at the Mundelein Holiday Inn. Strahan is federation 
treasurer and Jaroch is a board member. Donald Rum- 
sfeld will be the keynote speaker. Through the sale of 
$175 patron tickets and $50 dinner tickets, the 
federation will make a major contribution to finance 
the Republican program in Lake County. Tickets are 
being sold by county-wide committees arid at 
Republican Headquarters in Lake County. Tickets are 
being sold by county-wide committees : and at 
Republican Headquarters, 128 N. Genesee St., in 
Waukegan. 



To Host 

4 

Bowl-A-Thon 




The Antioch Jaycees will 
be hosting this year's Bowl- 
A-Thon for Autistic Children. 
This seventh annual event 
will be held on Sunday, May 
18, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., at 
the Antioch Bowling Lanes, 
onRte.*173. 

For the past seven years, 
the Antioch Jaycee women 
and the Antioch Jaycees 
have wholeheartedly sup- 
ported the Special Education 
Dist. of Lake County in its 
efforts to provide quality 
education for children with 
autism. 

Autism is a developmental 



disability which is 
characterized primarily by 
impaired or disordered 
language and com- 
munication, failure to 
.develop appropriate social 
relationships, and ritualistic 
or compulsive behaviors. 

Bowlers who wish to solicit 
sponsor support to raise 
funds for the* benefit of 
autistic children may obtain 
sponsor sheets from any of 
the financial institutions in 
Antioch or by contacting 
Debbie O'Connor, project 
chairperson, at (312)395- 
0152. 



Just prior to- lunch, a 
program on Alternatives For 
Teens was presented with 
Anne Strahan, Northern 
Illinois Council on 
Alcoholism and Substance 
Abuse Youth Program coor- 
dinator, serving as 
moderator. Area teens gave 
short presentations on Lake 
County Operation Snowball, 
Project Graduation, People 
Against Crime and Drugs 
(PACD) Youth Alliance; and 
Peer Counseling by 
Barrington Youth Services 
and students from. North 
Chicago Community High 
School, 

Several students attending 
the workshops presented 



reports on their specific 
workshop during the wrap 
up, which concluded the day. 
The .conference was 
presented through the spon- 
sorship of a grant from the 
Illinois Parents Too Soon 
Program. A conference 
planning board made up of 
representatives from Lake 
County high schools, social 
service agencies, concerned 
parents and students, under 
the chairmanship of Bar- 
bara Gordon, Lake County 
Community Action Project 
(LCCAP) executive direc- 
tor, planned and coordinated 
the day's event. LCCAP also 
served as the sponsoring 
agency for the conference. 



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Thursday May 15, 1986 






Lakeland Newspapers 236 



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Women In Government Hold First Meeting 



by VIRGINIA M. 
KRUEGER 

Attendees at the first 
meeting of "Lake County 
Women Officials In 
Government," were 
welcomed by State Rep. 
Virginia Fredrichs. 



Fredrichs introduced Sen. 
Adeline Geo-Karis, who 
, during the invocation, asked 
that assistance be given to 
women in government, 
presently, and in the future. 

All women officials in 
Lake County Government 



had been invited to the 
meeting which was held May 
10 at the Country Squire 
Restaurant in Grayslake. 

After lunch, Sue 
Gravenhorst, University of 
Illinois trustee, introduced 
State Rep. Jane- Barnes. 



McRee To Take Over 



In formal change-of- 
command ceremonies to be 
held at 10 a.m. on May 21, the 
leadership of Headquarters 
Fort Sheridan will be tran- 
sferred from Col. Stanley E. 
Thomas to Col. Marshall R. 
McRee, who will become the 
75th commander of the 99- 
year-old Army post. 

McRee assumes command 
after duties as assistant 
chief of staff and deputy 
chief of staff for logistics 
with Fourth U.S. Army 
Headquarters since last Sep- 
tember. Col. Thomas will 
become commander of 
Readiness Group-Redstone 
Arsenal at Redstone Ar- 
senal, Ala. He has 'com- 
manded Fort Sheridan 
Headquarters since Nov. 7, 
1983. 

Lt. Gen. Edward C. Peter, 
commanding general of 
Fourth U.S. Army 
Headquarters at Fort 
Sheridan, will be host for the 
May 21 ceremonies. The 
Fourth Army Band will per- 
form and several troop units 
will parade. The public 
program will be held on the 
post parade ground. In the 
event of inclement weather, 



ceremonies will be held in 
the nearby post gymnasium. 

Col. McRee, a native of 
Newton, N.C., graduated 
from the Citadel, 
Charleston, S.C. and was 
commissioned as a field ar- 
tillery officer in June 1961. 
His first assignment was at 
Fort Rucker, Ala., where he 
served with the 31st Infantry 
Regiment. 




During his 25 years in the 
Army, McRee has served 
two tours in Vietnam, com- 
manded a field artillery bat- 
talion in Germany, com- 
manded the 214th Field Ar- 
tillery Brigade at Fort Sill, 
Okla. and served in 
numerous staff assignments. 

Col. McRee is a graduate 
of the Army Command and 
General Staff College and 
the Army War College. He 
holds a masters degree in 
rehabilitation counseling 
from Central Arkansas 
University, Conway, Ark. 

Col. McRee and his wife 
Pat are residents of Fort 
Sheridan. Their two 
daughters, Stephanie and 
Tracy, are college students. 

Currently, Fort sheridan is 
staffed by 1400 active duty 
soldiers, ' augmented by 
about 1700 civilian 
specialists and technicians. 
Approximately 1450 military 
family members are 
residents of Fort Sheridan. 



"It's not easy being a woman 
and trying to become an 
elected official," said 
Barnes. "It's good to have 
women in public office," she 
continued, "not that men are 
not dedicated, but often their 
priorities are different." She 
cited several issues, mainly 
concerning women, and 
seemed to feel that although 
men may sympathize with 
these issues, they don't 
always give the "push" to 
get them put through! 

For instance, when women 
hear about rape, wife and 
child abuse or perhaps 
negligence in paying child 
support, they become angry 
enough to want to try to do 
what they can to protect 
others from such injustices. 
Not meaning to pick on men, 
Barnes hastened to add, "It 
takes supportive men to help 
women achieve." 

. Another guest speaker was 
Barbara Richardson, Lake 
County Coroner, who spoke 
on the symbolism of 
"Wings." "Starting today," 
Richardson addressed the 
audience, "you and I are 
ready to soar, ready to use 
our 'wings' and take off in 
government! (Name tags for 
the day were in the shapes .of 
wings.) We will 'wing' our 
way to new opportunities." 

■ Other speakers included;: 



Verna Clayton, president, 
Buffalo Grove Village 
Board; Faith Boettcher, 

Liberty ville Twp. Clerk; 
Eleanor Rostron, Waukegan 
County Board Member; 
Evelyn Alexander, Dist. 123 
School Board; Barbara 
Monsor, Lake Bluff Precinct 
Committeewoman; Betty 
Niemi, assessor, Grant 
Twp.; and Sue Grovenhorst, 
trustee, University of 
Illinois, Lake Forest. 

The positions of- these 
ladies, as you can see, are 
really diversified. In many 
cases they spoke of both men 
and women already in 
politics (frequently of the 
opposite party), who had 
taken the time to "give of 
themselves" in helping these 
women attain their goals. 
This, they explained, was to 
be the purpose of forming a 
"Wing" group. As Barnes 
had stated, "This is to be a 
non-partisan support group 
so, in no way, will we en- 
dorse any one party. Said 
Niemi, "We want all women 
to know they are welcome to 
join 'Women in Government' 
and give their input or 
perhaps, just enjoy being 
educated about politics." 

The meeting room had 
been set up with round 
tables, each seating 10 
women. There were no 
seating assignments, other 
than those at the speakers 



table, so Republicans and 
Democrats were literally 
thrown together. Ladies at 
each table introduced 
themselves to one another 
and enjoyed pleasant lun- 
cheon conversation, not 
knowing, nor seemingly 
caring, about the political 
affiliations, of their table 
males. 

Women were asked to 
vote, by a show of hands, if 
they would be in favor of 
such a group as "Wing" 
being formed. Fees would be 
$25 for charter members, it 
was announced. From where 
this writer was seated, the 
vote appeared unanimous 
for "Wing." Each woman 
was asked to sign a paper to 
this effect and to suggest 
when she felt would be a 
good time to hold the next 
meeting. 

The significant thread that 
seemed to wind through each 
speaker's presentation, as 
she told how she initially 
became involved in, politics, 
was the fact that each of the 
women had been active in 
their communities before 
seeking further com- 
mittment in civic affairs. 
This brought to mind the old 
adage: "When you want 
something done, ask a busy 
person to do it." 



Marshall McRee 



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24B Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday May 15, 1986 



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Thursday May 15, 1956 



Lakeland Newspapers 25B 






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— LEGAL— 

STATE Of IUIMOIS 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE 1VTH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT LAKE COUNTY— 
IN PROBATE 

In the Mattel of the Estate 
of ANNA H. MAD5EN, 
Deceased. 

No.86P319 

CLAIM NOTICE 

Notice is given of the 
death of ANNA H. MAD- 
SEN, of Lake Villa, Illinois. 
Letters of office were 
issued on April 18, 1986. to 
Robert W. Churchill, P.O. 
Box 284, Grayslake, 
Illinois. 60030, whose at- 
torney is Churchill, 
Baumgarlner S Phillips, 
Ltd., P.O. Box 284, 
Grayslake, Illinois, 60030. 

Claims against the 
estate may be filed in the 
office of the Clerk of the 
Court at 18 North County 
Street, Lake County Cour- 
thouse, Waukegan, 
Illinois, 60085, or with 
representative, or both, 
within 6 months from the 
date of issuance of letters 
and any claim not filed 
within that period is 
barred. Copies of a claim 
filed with the Clerk must 
be mailed or delivered to 
the representative and to 
the attorney within 10 days 
after it has been filed. 

Robert W. Churchill 
Representative 

Churchill, Baumgarlner & 

Phillips, Ltd. 

Attorney 

May 1,8 

& IS, 1986 

586A-456-LV 



—LEGAL- 
NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Notice is hereby given by 
the Board af Education of 
Warren Township High 
School, District Number 
121, in Lake County Illinois 
that an Amended Budget 
for said School District for 
the fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 1986, will be on file 
and available for public in- 
spection at 300 S. 
Waukegan Road, Lake 
Forest, Illinois, from and 
.after 8 o'clock a.m. on the 
ilSlhdayofMay, 1986. 



May 20, 1986. 



Notice is further hereby 
given ihot a public hearing 
on said budget will be 
given at 7 o'clock p.m. on 
the 19th day of June. 1986, 
at Viking Junior High 
School wilhin the boun- 
daries of the District. 

Dated this 9th day of May, 
1986. 

Jan Brennan, 

Secretary 

Board of Education 

School District 

Number 121 

Gurnee, Illinois, 60031 

May 15. 1986 
586C-492-WN 



—LEGAL- 
PUBLIC NOTICE 



PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY 
given that the Civil Service 
Commission of the Village 
of Gurnee will condjct an 
examination for promotion 
to the rank of Maintenance 
Man II in the Gurnee Public 
Works Department. The 
examination will be based 
on ascertained merit and 
examination as to obility. 
There is no fee for 
examination. 



Applicants must have ser- 
ved two (2) years of active 
duty in the grade from 
which the first promotion 
is sought. 

Examination will be on 
May 21, 1986 at 7:00 P.M. 
at the Gurnee Fire Station. 
Applications must be filed 
with Public Works Superin- 
tendent, Richard Wright, 
no later than 5:00 P.M. on 



Village of Gurnee 

Civil Service 

Commission 

By: Richard C Svehla.. 

Secretary 

586B-473-GP 
May 8, 15,1986 



—LEGAL- 
SHERIFF'S SALE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF COOK.ii 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE 19TH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, 
ILLINOIS. 

Commonwealth Eastern 
Mortgage Corporation, 
formerly known as Jersey 
Mortgage Company, a cor- 
poration organized and 
existing under the laws of 
the State of New Jersey, 
Plaintiff, 

vs. 

Robert Thomas Honan, 
also known as Robert T. 
Honan, Sheryl A. Konan 
and Unknown Owners. 

No.85CH419 

Public notice is hereby 
given that, pursuant to a 
Judgment made and en- 
tered by said Court in the 
above entitled cause on 
March 26, 1986, I, Robert 
Babcox, Sheriff of Lake 
County, Illinois, will, on 
Monday, June 2. 1986,. at 
the hour of 9:00 A.M. In 
Room C-105 of the Lake 
County Courthouse, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell at 

Sublic vendue to the 
ighest and best bidder for 
cash, the following 
described premises and 
real estate, in said 
Judgment mentioned, 
situated in the County of 
Lake and State of Illinois. 
or so much thereof as shall 
be sufficient to satisfy sold 
Judgment, to-wit: 

Lots 83 and 84 in 
Malman's First Addition 
to Lake Shore Park, a 
Subdivision of port of 
the South East Quarter 
of the North East Quar- 
ter of Section 25, Town- 
ship 44 North, Range 9, 
East of the 3rd P.M., ac- 
cording to the Plat 
thereof, recorded May 
7, 1926 as Document 
No. 278469. in Book "P" 
of Plats, page 36, in 
Lake County, Illinois, 
commonly known as 
415 Woodland Avenue, 
Wauconda, Illinois. 

Dated, Waukegan, Illinois, 
May 1st, 1986. 

Robert Babcox, 

Sheriff of 

Lake County, 

Illinois 

Walsh, Case, 
Coale & Brown 
Attorney(s) for 
Plaintiff 

2500 Prudential Plaza 
Chicago, Illinois 
(312)938-3824 

May 1 . 8 

S 15, 1986 

5B6A-439-WL 



-LEGAL- 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: The 
Galley. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED 
IN THIS COUNTY: 26050 
Rivervtew Place, Antioch, 
Illinois, 60002. 

NAME(S) AND POST OF- 
FICE OR RESIDENCE AD- 
DRESSES) OF THE PER- 
SON^) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRAN- 
SACTING BUS1NES5: 
Michael E. May, 40274 N. 
West Shore Dr., Antioch, 
Illinois, 60002. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE.m 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 



owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
.are correct as shown. 

Michael E. May 
4-12-86 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE.U 

The foregoing in- 
strument was 
acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) intending 
to conduct the business 
this April 17, 1986. 

Sandy Weitz, 
Notary Public 

RECEIVED: April 21.1986 
Lake County Clerk » 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

May 1.8 

& 15. 1986 

586A-442-LV 



—LEGAL- 
SHERIFF'S SALE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, 
COUNTY OF COOK.ts 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE ItTH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY. 
ILLINOIS. 

GreatAmerican Federal 
Savings and Loan 
Association, a corporation 
organized and existing un- 
der the laws of the United 
Stoles of America, Plain- 
tiff, 

vs. 

Robert A. Enger, Patricia 
A. (Enger, State Bank of 
Antioch, State Bank of An- 
tioch, an Illinois bonking 
corporation, as trustee, 
under trust agreement 
dated May 9, 1983 and 
known as trust No. 173, 
City of Waukegan and 
Unknown Owners. 

No. 84CH394 

Public notice is hereby 
given that, pursuant to a 
Judgment made and en-, 
tered by said Court in the 
above entitled cause on 
March 17, 1986, I, Robert 
Babcox,' Sheriff of Lake 
County, Illinois, will, on 
Monday, June 2, 1986, at 
the hour of 9:00 A.M. in 
Room C-105 of the Lake 
County Courthouse, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell at 
public vendue to the 
highest and best bidder for 
cash, the following 
described premises ana 
real estate, in said 
Judgment mentioned, 
situated in the County of 
Lake and State of Illinois, 
or so much thereof as shall 
bs sufficient to satisfy said 
Judgment, to-wit: 

Lot 17 in County Clerk's 
Subdivision of part of 
the East Half of Sec- 
tions 17 and 20, Town- 
ship 45 North, Range 
12, East of the Third 
Principal Meridian, ac- 
cording to the plat 
thereof, recorded In 
Book "H" of Plats, 
Pages 30 and 31, said 
Lot 17 also described as 
follows, to-wit: that 
part of the East Half of 
Section 20, Township 45 
North, Range 12, East 
of the Third Principal 
Meridian, described as 
follows: commencing 
on the South line of Lot 
33 of Assessors Sub- 
division on the West 
line of Butrick Street a 
distance of 33.50 chains 
South of the North line 
of the Northeast Quar- 
ter of Section 20, 
aforesaid; thence West 
125 feet; thence North 
32 feet; thence Eost 125 
feet and thence South 
32 feet to the place of 
beginning, In Lake 
County, Illinois, com- 
monly known as 308 N. 
Butrick, Waukegan, 
Illinois. 

Dated, Waukegan, 
Illinois, May 1st, 1986. 

Robert Babcox, 
Sheriff of 
Lake County, 
Illinois 
Wolsh, Case, 
Coale & Brown, 
Attorney (s) for 
Plaintiff. 

2500 Prudential Plaza, 
Chicago, Illinois 
(312)938-3824 

May 1 , 8 

&15, 1986 

586A-436-GL 



-LEGAL- 
SHERIFF'S SALE 

ST ATE OF ILLINOIS, 

COUNTY OF COOK, u 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE IfTH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, 
ILLINOIS. . 

GreatAmerican Federal 
Savings and Loan 
Association, a corporation 
organized arid existing un- 
der the laws of the United 
. States of America, Plain? 
tiff. 

vs. 

Mark J, Round, Cynthia P.- 
Round, North Bank and 
Unknown Owners. 

No. 85CH311 

Public notice Is hereby 
given lhat, pursuant to a 
Judgment- made and en- 
tered by said Court in the 
above entitled cause on 
March 17, 1986. I, Robert 
Babcox, Sheriff of Lake 
County, Illinois, will, on 
Monday, June 2, 1986, at 
the hour of 9:00 A.M. in 
Room C-105 of the Lake 
County Courthouse, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell at 
public vendue to the 
highest and best bidder for 
cash, the following 
described premises and 
real estate, in said 
Judgment mentioned, 
situated in the County of 
Lake and State of Illinois, 
or so much thereof as shall 
be sufficient to satisfy said 
Judgment, to-wit: 

Parcel 1: Lot 3 In Scat- 
terwood West, being a 
Subdivision in the South 
East quarter of the Nor- 
th East quarter of Sec- 
tion 29. Township 43 
North, Range 12, East 
of the Third Principal 
Meridian, and also part 
of Lot 4, Deere Park 
Subdivision, according 
to the plat thereof, 
recorded November -5, 
1965, as Document 
1283981, in Book 43 of 
plats, page 16, in Lake 
County, Illinois. 

Parcel 2: Easement for 
ingress and egress for 
the benefit of Parcel 1 
over the South 25 feet 
of Lot 2 in Subdivision 
aforesaid as said 
easement is delineated 
on said above men- 
tioned plot, in Lake 
County. Illinois, com- 
monly known as 1300 
Warwick Court, Deer- 
field, Illinois. • 

Dated, Waukegan, Illinois, 
Moy 1st. 1986. 

Robert Babcox, 

Sheriff of 

Lake County, 

Illinois 

Walsh, Case, 
Coale & Brown 
Attorney(s)for - 
Plaintiff 

2500 Prudential Plaza 
Chicago, Illinois 
(312) 938-3824 



Petitioner: Jack and 
Sharon Ester . 

Petition: Request to 
change from a R-4 
Zoning to M-1 Zoning 
for Ine purpose ol 
building manufacturing 
units. 

LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 

The parj of , the west 
half of the northeast 
quarter of Section 8, 
Township 46 North, 
Range 10 Eost of the 3rd 
Principal Meridian 
described as follows: 
Beginning on the center 
line extended South of 

Dram's Court as shown 
in Book "L" of Plats 
Page . 59, at a point 
1124.2 feet South of the 
Northline of said West 
half of the Northeast 
quarter of Section 8; 
thence East ot right 
angles to the center 
line of Drom's Court; 
399.1 feet;' thence 
South parallel to the 
center line of Drom's 
Court; 27.9 feet to the 
Southeasterly line of 
Lot 1 in Count Clerk's 
Subdivision; thence 
South 46 degrees West 
553.3 feet to ihe center 
line of Drom's Court; 
thence North 416,1 feet 
to the place of begin- 
ning (except the North 
110.0 feet of the West 
200.0 feet thereof) in 
Lake County, Illinois. 

All persons wishing to be 
heard for or against said 
petition are requested to 
appear at scheduled 
hearing. 

Vernon Burdick, 

Chairman 

Zoning Board 

of Appeals 

May 15. 1986 
586C-490-AR 



May 1 , 8 

& 15, 1986 

586A-437-GL 



-LEGAL- 
NOTICE 

The regular monthly 
meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of the Antioch 
Township Library has been 
changed from Moy 27, 1986 
to May 20, 1986 at 4:30 
p.m. in the Meeting Room 
of the . Anlioch Township 
Library. 

May 15, 22,29, 

& June 5, 1986 

586C-488-AR 



-LEGAL- 
NOTICE 
OF PUBLIC HEARING 
ZONING BOARD 
OF APPEALS 

On Wednesday, June 4, 
1986 at 7:30 p.m. at An- 
tioch Village Hall, 874 
Main Street, Antioch. 
Illinois the Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hear the 
following petition: 



-LEGAL- 
STATE OF ILLINOIS, 
COUNTY OF LAKE.it 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
FOR THE IfTH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY. 
ILLINOIS. 

First Federal Savings and 
Loan of Freoport, Plaintiff. 

vs. 

Timothy J. Towne, et al., 
Defendants. 

No. 86Ch208 

The requisite affidavit for 
publication having been 
filed, notice is hereby 
given you. Unknown 
Owners, defendant(s) in 
the above entitled suit, 
that the said suit has been 
commenced in ihe Circuit 
Court of Lake County, 
Chancery Division, by the 
said plaintiff-aaoinst you 
and other defendants, 
praying far the foreclosure 
of a certain (Mortgage) 
conveying the premises as 
' follows, to-wlt:" 

Lot 43 In Sunnyslde 
Park, a Subdivision of 
part of the North East 
'/* of Section 21 and the 
North West % of Sec- 
tion 22, Township 44 
North, Range 11, East 
of the Third Principal 
Meridian, according to 
the plat thereof recor- 
ded August 7. 1923 as 
Document 227922. In 
Book "L" of plats, page 
108, in Lake County, 
Illinois. 

Commonly known and 
described as 228 Sun- 
nyside, Llbertyvllle, 
Illinois. 

and which said (Mortgage) 
was made by Timothy J. 
Towne, Mortgagor, to First 
Federal Savings and Loan 
of Freoport, os (Mor- 
■ tgagee), and recorded in 
the office of the Recorder 
of Deeds of Lake County, 
Illinois, as document num- 
ber 2324415, and for other 
relief; that summons was 
duly Issued out of the sold 
Court against you as 
provided by law, and that 
the said suit is now pen- 
ding. 



Now, therefore, unless 
you, the said above named 
defendant(s), file your an- 
swer to the Complaint In 
the said suit or otherwise 
make your appearance 
therein, In the office of the 
Clerk of the Circuit Court 
of Lake County, in the Lake 
County Courthouse, 
Waukegan, Illinois, on or 
before the 2nd day of 
June, 1986, default may be 
entered against you at any 
time after that day and a 
Judgment entered In ac- 
cordance with the prayer 
of said Complaint. 

Dated,. Waukegan, 
Illinois, May 1st, 1986. 

Sally D.Coffelt, 
Clerk 

Scumacher, Jones, Kelly, 
Olson & Pusch Attorney(s) 
for Plaintiff. 

Schumacher, Jones 
Kelly, Olson & Pusch 
3 First National Plaza. 
Suite 2350 
Chicago, Illinois, 60602 

May 1 , 8 

& 15. 1986 

586A-435-GL 



—LEGAL- 
NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Public notice is hereby 
given that the tentative 
Combined Annual Budget 
and. Appropriation Or- 
dinance of the Wildwood 
Park District, Lake County, 
Illinois, for the fiscal year 
beginning May 1 , 1986 and 
ending April 30, 1987, is 
conveniently available for 
public inspection with the 
Secretary of Wildwood 
Park District, Wendell J. 
Fry. from and after the 
date hereof. 

Public notice is further 
given that a public hearing 
on the adoption of said 
Combined Annual Budget 
and Appropriation Or- 
dinance will be held at the 
Warren Township Com- 
munity Center, 7137 
Washington Street, Gur- 
nee, Illinois, on June 17, 
1986, at the hour of 7:30 
P.M. and thot final action 
on said Combined Annual 
Budget and Appropriation 
Ordinance will be taken ot 
that time. 

By order of the Board of 
Commissioners af Wild- 
wood Park District. 

Wendell J. Fry, 
Secretary 

May 15. 1986 
586C-481-WN 



—LEGAL- 
NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Public notice is hereby 
given that the tentative 
Combined Annual Budget 
and Appropriation Or- 
dinance of the Grandwood 
Park District. Lake County, 
Illinois, for the fiscal year 
beginning May 1, 1986 and 
ending April 30, 1987, is 
conveniently available for 
public inspection with the 
Secretary of Grandwood 
Perk District, Steven F. 
Warneke, from and after 
the date hereof. 

Public notice Is further 
given that a public hearing 
on the adoption of said 
Combined Annual Budget 
and Appropriation Or- 
dinance will be held at the 
Community Center 
Building, 36630 N. Hutchins 
Road, Gurnee, Illinois, on 
June 18. 1986, at the hour 
of 7:30 P.M. and that final 
action on said Combined 
Annual Budget and Ap- 
propriation Ordinance will 
be taken at lhat lime. 

By order of the Board of 
Commissioners of Gran- 
dwood Park District. 

Steven F. Warneke, 
Secretary 

May 15, 1986 
586C-480-WN 



HOUSE HUNTINGT Find 
ust the home you're 
oaking for in Lakeland 

Newspapers' Classified. 
--J-osyl 



—LEGAL- 
STATE OF ILLINOIS. 
COUNTY OF LAKE.M 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
FOR THE IfTH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT. LAKE COUNTY, 
ILLINOIS. 

Bell Federal, Savings and 
Loan Association, a 
Federal savings and loan 
'association, Plaintiff,. 

vs. 

John A. Malveaux, Sr., et 
ol., Defendants. 

No. 86Chl46 

The requisite affidavit for 
publication having been 
filed, notice is hereby 
given you, Rhodo Island 
Hospital Trust National 
Bank, defendant in the 
above entitled suit, thot 
the said suit has been com- 
' menced in the Circuit Court 
iof Lake County. Chancery 
1 Division, by the said plain- 
llff-agagist you and other 
defendants, praying for 
the foreclosure of a certain 
(Mortgage) conveying the 
premises described as 
follows, to-wlt: 

Lot 1 in George S. 
Wood's Subdivision of 
Ihe West 2 Acres of the 
East 7 Acres of ihe 
South One-Third of the 
South half of the South 
West Quarter of Sec- 
tion 36, Township 43 
North, Range 12, East 
of Ihe 3rd P.M., ac- 
cording to the Plat 
thereof, recorded Oc- 
tober 30, 1935, os 
Document 418209, in 
Lake County. Illinois, 
commonly known as: 8 
Sheldon Lane, Highland 
Pork, Illinois, 60035, 
improved with a 1 '/» 
Story Expansible Frame 
Residence, 



and which said (Mortgage) 
was mode by John A. 
Malveaux, Sr. and Gloria 
A. Malveaux, his wife, 
Mortgagors, to Bell 
Federal Savings and Loon 
Association, a Federal 
savings and loan 
association, as (Mor- - 
tgagee), and recorded In 
the office of the Recorder 
of Deeds of Lake County, 
Illinois, as document num- 
ber 1709423, and for other 
relief; that summons was 
duly issued out of the said 
Court against you as 
provided by law, and that 
the said suit is now pen- 
ding. 

Now, therefore, unless 
you, the said above named 
defendant, file your an- 
swer to the Complaint in 
i the said suit or otherwise 
make your appeorance 
therein, in the office of the 
Clerk of the Circuit Court 
ol Lake County, in the Lake 
County Courthouse, 
Waukegan, Illinois, on or 
before the 16th day of 
June, 1986, default may be 
entered against you at any 
time after thot day and a 
Judgment entered In ac- 
cordance with the prayer 
of said Complaint. 

Dated, Waukegan, 
Illinois, May 15th, 1986, 

Sally D. Coffelt, 
Clerk 

Shcumacher, Jones, Kelly, 
Olson & Pusch Attorney(s) 
for Plaintiff. 

Shcumacher, Jones 

Ketly, Olson & Pusch 

Attorney (s) 

3 First National Plaza 

Suite 2350 

Chicago, Illinois, 60602 

May 15, 22 
8 29.1986 . 
586C-4B3-GL 



YOUR TICKET 
' TO OVEA 
300,000 

ciftcuuinHt 




268 Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday May 15, 1986 



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—LEGAL— 

E OF ILLINOIS, 
IUNTY OF LAKE/st 
I THE CIRCUIT COURT 
»R THE WH JUDICIAL 
IRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, 
LINOIS. 

Federal Savings and 
>cn Association, a 
jdora! savings and loan 

isociotion, Plaintiff, 



vs. 

fmad Khoury, 
defendants. , 

lo. 86Ch247 " 



el al. 



The requisite affidavit for 
Duplication having been 
pled, notice is hereby 
liven: you, Unknown 
Jwners, defendant(s) in 
[the above entitled suit, 
[that the said suit has been 
[commenced in -the Circuit 
[Court of Lake County, 
[Chancery Division, by the 
said plaintiff 'against you 
and other defendants, 
praying for the foreclosure 
of a certain (Mortgage) 
conveying the premises 
described as follows, la- 
wit: 

Lot 7 in Starwood being 
a Subdivision of the 
Northeast Quarter of _ 
the Northeast Quarter 
of the Northwest Quar- 
ter of Section 15, Town- 
ship 43 North, Range 
12, Easf of the Third 
Principal Meridian, ac- 
cording to the ptat 
thereof, recorded Sep- 
tember 26. 1977 as 
I Document 1868609 in 
Lake „County, Illinois, 
commonly known as: 
585 Euclid Court, 
Highland Park, Illinois, 
improved with a 2 story 
Colonial Brick & Frame 
Residence, 

and which said (Mortgage) 
was made by Emand 
Khoury and Samya Khoury 
and The First National 
Bank of Des Plaines, as 
Trustee Under Trust 
Agreement No. 97782963, 
Mortgagors, to Bell 
Federal Savings and Loan 
Association, a Federal 
savings and loan 
association, as (Mor- 
tgagee), and recorded in 
the office of the Recorder 
of Deeds of Lake County, 
Illinois, as document num- 
ber 2082002, and for other 
relief; that summons was 
duly issued out of the sold 
Court against you as 
provided by law, and that 
the said suit is now pen- 
ding. 

Now, therefore, unless 
you, the said above named 
defendant(s), file your an- 
swer to the Complaint in 
the said suit or otherwise 
make your appearance 
therein, in the office of the 
Clerk of the Circuit Court 
of Lake County, in the Lake 
County Courthouse, 
Waukegan, Illinois, on or 
before the 16th day of 
June, 1986, default may be 
entered against you at any 
time after that day and a 
Judgment entered in ac- 
cordance with the prayer 
of said Complaint. 

Doted, Waukegan, 
Illinois, May 2nd, 1986. 

Sally D.Coffelt, 

Clerk 

* * 

Schumacher, Jones, Kelly, 
Olson & Pusch Attorney(s) 
forPlointiff. 

Schumacher, Jones 

Kelly, Olson & Pusch, 

Attorney(s) 

3 First National Plaza 

Suite 2350 

Chicago, Illinois. 60602 

May 15,22 

8 29, 1986 

S86C-4B2-GL 



—LEGAL- 
NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Public notice is hereby 
given that the tentative 
Combined Annual Budget 
and Appropriation Or- 
dinance of the Wauconda 
Park District, Lake County. 
Illinois, for the fiscal year 
beginning May 1 . 1986 and 
ending April 30, 1987, is 



-conveniently available for 
public inspection with the 
Secretary of Wauconda 
Park District, Caroline - 
KeHlng, from and after the 
date hereof. 

Public notice is further 
given that a public hearing 
on the adoption of sold 
Combined Annual Budget 
and Appropriation -Or- 
dinance will be held tit the 
Beach House, 112 Park 
Street, Wauconda, Illinois, 
on June 10, 1986, at the 
hour of 8:00 P.M. and that 
final action on said Com- 
bined Annual Budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance 
will be taken at that time. 

By order of the Board of 
Commissioners of Waucon- 
da Park District. 

Caroline Kelllng, 
.Secretary 

May 15, 1986 
566C-484-WL 



—LEGAL- 
NOTICE 
TO BIDDERS 

Village of. Round Lake 
Heights 629 Pontiac Court 
is accepting sealed 
proposals for purchase of 
one new Jet Sewer^ 
Cleaner, trailer mount" 
with capacity of 600 gal. of 
water, V* inch Jet hose 400 
ft. with Jet nozzles with 
1800 lbs. pressure of PSI 
and one Root cutter up to 
lOindla. 

Sealed proposals will be 
received by the Village 
Clerk at 629 Pontiac Court 
until 12:00 noon June 2, 
1986. 

Proposal or bid opening 
will be June 4, 1986 at 7:00 
p.m. in the council room of 
the Village Hall. 

Village of Round Lake 
Heights reserve the right 
to refuse any or all Bid 
Proposals and waive 
technicalities. 

Joan Hendricks, 
Village Clerk 

May 15.22, 1986 
5B6C-486-RL 



—LEGAL- 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Networking Technologies 
Group, 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRAN- 
SACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
39160 N. Sir John Drive. 
Lake Villa, II., 60046. 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Robert A. Wallberg, 39160 
N. Sir. John Drive, Lake 
Villa, II., 60046. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

COUNTY OF LAKE,ts 

Thfs Is to certify that the ' 
undersigned Intend(s) lo 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated .and 
that the true or real full 
name(s). of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 

Robert A. Wallberg 
4/25/86 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTYOFLAKE.il 

The foregoing in- 
strument was 
acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) intending 
to conduct the business 
this April 25, 1986. . 

Linda Wright, 
Deputy Clerk 

RECEIVED: April 25, 1986 
Lake County Clerk 
Linda lahuzi Hess 

May 8, 15 

1122,1986 

- 5B6B-4S9-LV 

BUYERS AND Sellers come 

together every week in 
lakeland Cloitilied. 



—LEGAL- 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME .OF BUSINESS:; 
Unicorn Resources. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR TRAN- 
SACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
39160 N. Sir John Drive,. 
Lake Villa, II., 60046 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING; 
CONDUCTING - OR 
TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Robert A. Wallberg, 39160 
N. Sir John Drive, Lake 
Villa, II., 60046. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE, is 

I 
This is to certify that the 
undersigned Inlend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business, from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 

Robert A. Wallberg 
4/25/86 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE.u 

The foregoing In- 
strument was 
acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) intending 
to conduct the business 
this April 25, 1986. 

Linda Wright. 
Deputy Clerk 

RECEIVED: April 25, 1986 
Lake County Clerk 
Linda lanuzi Hess 

May 8. 15 

& 22, 1986 

586B-458-LV 



—LEGAL— 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Ran 
Industrial Truck Main- 
tenance. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED 
IN THIS COUNTY: 179 
Lakewood Dr., Antioch, II., 
60002. 

jNAME(S) AND POST OF- 
JFICE OR RESIDENCE AD- 
iDRESSfES) OF THE PER- 
SON(S) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRAN- 
SACTING BUSINESS: 
Richard Nelson,, 179 
Lakewood Dr., Antioch, II., 
60002. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE.it 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
.business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown, 

Richard Nelson 
4-30-86 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE.ts . 

The foregoing In- 
strument was 
acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) intending 
to conduct the business 
this April 30, 1986. 

Linda Wright, 

Deputy Clerk 

. RECEIVED: April 30, 1986 
Lake County Clerk 
Linda lanuzi Hess 

May 8, 15 

& 22, 1986 

586B-477-AR 



1x2 

• Sounds Mk« , 

• multiplication? Ou- 

• eis again. It'i 
4> newspaper talk far, ' 
- a one column by !•; 
1 Inch ad. Too small 

• to be eHectlvaT 

• You're reading this 

• one I . 
•eeeeeeeee 



—LEGAL— 

TO: Unknown Owners, Occupants, Interested Parties, 
Linda I. Hess, County Clerk, Billy Dean Morris, Reiner 
Siedentop, Charles R.- "Amburn. Trustee, Associates 
Finance, Inci, UTAD 8/2/B3, Trust N, 2229690. 

COUNTY OF LAKE, 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 

Date Premises Sold: December 14,1 983. 

Index Number: 09-28-103-010. 

Sold For General Taxes For The Year: 1982. 



TAX DEED NO. 
FILE: 4-11-86 



83 TX 46 



THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD 
FOR DELINQUENT TAXES 

Legal Description: Lot 30 in Block 6 in Mylith Park, 
being a Subdivision of part of the East '/» of the North 
West '/< of Section 28,. Township 44 North, Range 9, 
East 61 fhe Third Principal Meridian, according to the • 
Plat thereof recorded September 6, 1921 as Document 
204979, in Book "K" of Plats,- Page 75, in Lake County, 
Illinois. 

This notice Is to advise you that the above property has 
been sold for delinquent taxes and that the period of 
redemption from the sale will expire on 8/25/B6. 

This notice is also to advise you that a petition has been 
filed for a tax deed which will transfer title and the right 
to possession of this property if redemption is not made 
on or before August 25, 1986. 

This matter is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of this - 
county in Waukegan. Illinois on 9/15/86, 1:30 p.m. Room 
107. 

You maybe present at this hearing but your right to 
redeem will already have expired at that time. 

YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY 
TO PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY 

Redemption can be made at any time on or before 
8/25/86 by applying lo the County Clerk of Lake County, 
Illinois, at the County Courthouse in Waukegan, Illinois. 

For further information, contact the County Clerk. 

A, M. Judge, 

'. Purchaser 

or Assignee 

Dan Walker, Jr. 

Attorney at Law 

1211 W. 22nd Street 

616 

Oak Brook, II., 60521 

(312)920-1105 

May 8, 15 

& 22, 1986 

586B-462-WL 

■»»oeeeeMoe»»oeeeMBeeeeeeM»»»»»»»MOMO»eee»»e»»M»ei 

—LEGAL— 

TO: Unknown Owners, Occupants, Interested Parties, 
Linda I. Hess, County Clerk, Frank Masterson as Guardian 
and Next Friend of Kimberly Forslin, a Minor, Unknown 
Heirs and Devisees of Harold Schlosser, deceased, 
Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Lorraine Schlosser, 
deceased, and Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Sandy 
Tichy, deceased, and Frank Masterson, Kimberly Forslin. 

COUNTY OF LAKE, 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 

Dale Premises Sold: December 12, 1983. 

Index Number: 01-34-109.007. 

Sold For General Taxes For The Year: 1 982, 



TAX DEED NO. 
FILE: 4-11-86 



83 TX 46 



THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD 
FOR DELINQUENT TAXES 

Legal Description: Lots 15 and 16 in Block 6 in 
Oakland Subdivision, Unit No. 2 being a Subdivision of 
Lots "A", "B", 59 and part of Lot 12 and part of Lotus 
Avenue in Oakland Subdivision of part of the North Vi 
of Section 34,.Townshlp 46 North. Range 9, East of the 
Third Principal Meridian, according to the plat thereof 
recorded April 19, 1928 as Document 316371, in Book 
"S" of Plats, Pages 72 and 73; in Lake County, Illinois. 

This notice is to advise you that the above properly has 
been sold for delinquent taxes and that the period of 
redemption from the sale will expire on 8/25/86. 

This notice is also to advise you that a petition has been 
filed for a tax deed which will transfer title and the right 
to possession of this property if redemption is not made 
on or before August 25, 1986. 

This matter is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of this 
county .in Waukegan, Illinois on 9/15/86, at 1:30 p.m. 
Room 107. 

You may be present at this hearing, but your right to 
redeem will already have expired at that time, 

YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY 
TO PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY 

Redemption can be made at any time on or before 
8/25/86 by applying to the County Clerk of Lake County, 
Illinois, at the County Courthouse in Waukegan, Illinois. 

For further information, contact ihe County Clerk. 

A. M. Judge, 

Purchaser 

or Assignee 

Dan Walker, Jr. 

Attorney at Law 

1211 W, 22nd Street 

616 

Oak Brook, II., 60521 

(312)920-1105 

MayS, 15, 

& 22, 1986 

•586B-465-FL 



—LEGAL— 

TO: Unknown Owners, Occupants, Interested Parties, 
Linda I. Hess, County Clerk, Bensenville State Bank UTAD 
1 1 -2-76 as Trust No. 76-247: Clarence T. Wolf and Jean M. 
Wolf. 

COUNTY OF LAKE, 
STATE OF ILLINOIS • 

Dote Premises Sold: December 12, 1983. 

Index Number: 06-02-108-003. 

Sold For General Taxes For The Year: 1 982. 




TAX DEED NO.: 
FILE: 4-1 1-86 



83TX46 



THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD 
FOR DELINQUENT TAXES 

Legal Description: Lot 2 In Block 145 in Venetian 
Village Unit No. 15, being a Subdivision of part of 
Section 2, Township 45 North, Range 10, East of the 
Third Principal meridian, according to the plat thereof 
recorded April 7, 1954 as Document 820687, Book 32 of 
Plats, Pages 88 and 89 and corrected by certificate of. 
correction recorded September 3, 1954 as Document 
835797, in Lake County, Illinois. 

This notice is to advise you that the above property has 
been sold for delinquent taxes and that the period of 
redemption from the sale, will expire on 8/25/86. 

This notice is also to advise you that a petition has been 
filed for a tax deed which will transfer title and the right 
to possession of this property if redemption is not mode 
on or before August 25, 1986. 

This matter is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of this 
county in.Waukegan, Illinois on 9/15/86, 1:30 p.m. Room 
107. 

- You' may be present at "this hearing, but your right to 
redeem will already have expired at that time. 

YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY 
TO PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY 

Redemption can be made at any time on or before 
8/25/86 by applying to the County Clerk of Lake County, 
Illinois, ot the County Courthouse in Waukegan, Illinois. 

t For further information, contact the County Clerk. 

A. M. Judge, 

Purchaser 

or Assignee 

Dan Walker, Jr. 

Attorney at Law 

1211 W. 22nd Street 

616 

Oak Brook. II., 60521 

(312)920-1105 

MayS, 15, 

& 22, 1986 

586B -463-LV 



—LEGAL— 

TO; Unknown Owners, Occupants, Interested Parties, 
Linda I. Hess, County Clerk, James E. Lemm, Joyce M. 
Lemm, Chicago Title and Trust Company Trust No, 
2068162; James Serdonov and Helen Serdonov; Financial 
Security Savings & Loan Association; and General Finance 
Corporation. 

COUNTY OF LAKE. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 

Date Premises Sold: December 13, 1983. 

Index Number: 05-23-1 14-009. 

Sold For General Taxes For The Year: 1982. 



TAX DEED NO. 
FILE: 4-1 1-86 



83TX46 



THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD 
FOR DELINQUENT TAXES 

Legal Description: Lot 30 in Indian Mound Sub- 
division in the North West '/« of Section 23, Township 
45 North, Range 9, East of ihe Third Principal 
Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded 
December 13, 1924 as Document 250122, in Book "N" 
of Plats, Page 64, in Lake County, Illinois. 

This notice is to advise you that the above property has 
been sold for delinquent taxes and that the period of 
redemption from the sale will expire on 8/25/86. 

This notice is also to advise you that a petition has been 
filed for a tax deed which will transfer title and the right 
to possession of this property if redemption is not made 
on or before August 25, 1986. 

This matter Is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of this 
counly In Waukegan, Illinois on 9/15/86, 1:30 p.m. Room 
107. 

You may be present at this hearing but your right to 
redeem will already have expired at that time. 

YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY 
TO PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY 

Redemption can be made at any time on or before 
8/25/86 by applying to the County Clerk of Lake County. 
Illinois, at the County Courthouse in Waukegan, llllnoi: 

For further information, contact the County Clerk. 

A. M. Judge, 
Purchaser 

or Assignor 

Dan Walker, Jr. 

Attorney at Law 

1211 W. 22nd Street 

616 

Oak Brook. II., 60521 

(312)920-1105 

May8, 15 

&'22, 1986 

586B-464-FL 



. i 



Thursday May 1 5, 1986 



Lakeland Newspaper! 27B 



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—UOAL— 

SUPPLEMENTARY 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

(Chang* of Ptnon'i 

Nam* or Address) 

(Changs to Addition off 

Business Address) 



NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Care Pool Service. 



We 



PERSON'S ADDRESS 

CHANGED: 

From:1532 N. Lake Shore 

Dr., Round Lake Beach, II., 

60073. 

To: 1532 N.Lake Shore Dr., 

Round Lake Beach; II., 

60073. . 

PERSON'S NAME 

CHANGED: 

From: Elva Lee Klldew 

To: Mildred L. Klldew 

BUSINESS ADDRESS(ES) 
CHANGED: 
From: NONE. 
To: NONE. 

ADDITION OF THE 
FOLLOWING BUSINESS AD- 
DRESSES): 
NONE. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE.SS 

This Is lo certify that the 
above described change(s) 
of Name(s) and/or Ad- 
dresses) pertoinina to the 
named business have been, 
mode effective 5/12/86. 



/s/Mlldred L. 
5- 12-86 



Kiidew 



STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE.SS 

The foregoing In- 
strument was 
acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) Intending 
to conduct the business 
this 5/12/86. 

Helen A. Crancord, 
Deputy Clerk 

RECEIVED: May 12. 1986 
Lake County Clerk 
Linda lonuzi Hess 

May 15,22 

&29, 1986 

5B6C-491-RL 



■ 



— UOAL— 

• ' *' 

TO: Vivienne Webster and Argyle Webster, her husband, 
record owners; Fred Back and June Ha Back, now known 
as Junelta Hollingsworth, contract purchasers; John' 
Baumgartner; parties in possession; "Unknown Owners"; :- 
other interested parties; and Linda Hess, County Clerk. 

COUNTY OF LAKE. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 

Date Premises Sold: March 20, 1984. ' . 

Index Number: 05-10-212-009 and 05-10-2) 2-010. 

Sold For General Taxes For The Year; 1982 and prior 

years. 

THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD 
FOR DELINQUENT TAXES 

Property located 240 and 242 E. Grand Avenue, Fox 
Lake. II. . 

Legal Description: Lots 31 and 32 in Brophy Farm 
Subdivision, being J.L. Shaw's Third Subdivision of Fox 
Lake in Section 10, Township 45 N, Range 9, Eost of the 
3rd P.M., attpt rec. Sept 8. 1913. os Doc. 149144, in 
Book "1" of Plats, pages 77, 78 and 79. 

This notice is to advise you that the above property has 
been sold for delinquent taxes and that the period of 
redemption from the sale, as extended, will expire on 
October 15, 1986. 

This notice is also to advise you that a petition has been 
filed for a tax deed which will transfer title and the right 
to possession of this property if redemption is not mode _ 
on or before October 1 5, 1986. 

* This matter is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of this 
County in Waukegan, Illinois, on Ocl. 21, 1986, 1:30 p.m. 
tntaseNo.B3TX46. 

You may be present at this hearing, but your right to' 
redeem will olready hove expired ot thai time. • ■ 

YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY 
TO PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY 

Redemption can be made at any time on or before Oct: 
15, 1986 by applying to the County Clerk of Lake County. 
Illinois, ot the County.Courlhouse in Waukegan, Illinois. 

Jack Livingston, 
Purchaser 

Warren C.Behr 
Attorney at Law 
23 N. Genesee St. 
Waukegan, ll., 60085 
(312)336-1800 

May 15. 1986 
586C493-FL 



—LEGAL- 
NOTICE 
OF LETTING 

Sealed proposals will be 
received at the Village 
Hall until 10:00 A.M., June 
6, 1986 for the base 
preparation and Seal 
Coating of approximately 
50,559 LF ol various streets 
located in the Village of 
Round Loke Beach. At that 
time the/ will be opened 
and read aloud. 

Proposals shall be sub- 
mitted on forms furnished 
by the Village, which may 
be obtained ol the office of 
the Department of Public 
Works, 224 W. Clarendon 
Dr., Round Lake Beach, ll.. 
60073, and shall be en- 
closed in an envelope 
endorsed "1986 Seal 
Coating". 

The right is reserved to 
reject any and all 
proposals and to waive 
technicalities. Proposal 
guarantee in the amount 
of 10% of the bid, or as 
provided in Article 102.00 
of the Standard 
Specifications for Road and 
Bridge Construction will be 
required. A surety bond 
for the full amount of the 
award will be required. 
Failure of the contractor to 
complete the contract 
within the time specified 
herein will be considered, 
just cause lo forfeit his 
surejy as provided in 
Article 108.11 of the 
Standard Specifications. 

By Order Of: 

Village of 

Round Lake Bench 

Carl Schrimpf , 

Mayor 

May 15, 1986 
586C-494-RL 



—LEGAL- 
GRANT 
TOWNSHIP 

Notice is hereby given that 
sealed proposals will be 
received at the office of 
The Grant Township Clerk 
at 411 Washington Street, 
Inglestde, Illinois, 60041 
until 4:30 o'clock, p.m., on 
May 27, 1986. Bids will be 
opened at the Town 
Meeting May 27, 1986, 7:00 
p.m. for furnishing of the 
following material: 

General Fund — 

2400 Ton Bituminous 
Surface 

Plant Mix 
3000 Gol. Material 

Prime Coat 
30 Ton Sand 

Community Develop- 
ment Block Grant Year 
12 

1 000 Ton Bituminous 
Plant Mix 

1000 Gol. Material 
Prime Coat 

10 Ton Sand 

Proposals shall be made 
on forms furnished by the 
Township Highway 
Commissioner and shall be 
addressed in a sealed 
envelope to: Jack Kiesgen, 
Grant Township Highway 
Commissioner, 411 
Washington St., Ingleside, 
It., 60041 and shall be 
marked "Mater i o I 
Proposal - Letting of Gront 
Township". Further in- 
formation regarding the 
letting may be obtained by 
contacting the Com- 
missioner at (312) 587- 
0770. The Township in 
accordance with the laws 
of the State of Illinois 
hereby notifies all bidders 
. thai it will affirmatively 
insure that the contract 
entered into pursuant to 
this advertisement will be 
awarded to the lowest 
responsible bidder without 
discrimination on the 
ground of race, color or 
national origin. 

By Order of 

Jack Kiesgen, 

Grant Township 

Highway Commissioner 

May 15. 1986 
586C-495-FL 



-LEGAL- 
AVON TOWNSHIP 

Notice is hereby given thai 
sealed proposals will be 
received at the office ol 
Avon Township Clerk a* 
433 E. Washington Street 
Round Lake Park, Illinois 
60073 until 4:30 o'clock 
P.M., on May 23, 1986 foi 
furnishing of the following 
material: 

12000 Gallons Bituminous 
Material 

Proposals shall be made 
on forms furnished by the 
Township Highway 
Commissioner, and shall 
be addressed in a sealed 
envelope to; Pal An- 
derson, Avon Township, 
Highway Commissioner, 
433 W. Washington St., 
Round Lake Park, ll,, 60073 
and shall be marked 
"Material Proposal 
Letting of Avon Township". 
Further information 
regarding the letting may 
be obtained by contacting 
the Highway Com- 
missioner at (312) 546- 
7480. The Township in 
accordance with the lows 
of the State of Illinois 
hereby notifies oil bidders 
that it will affirmatively 
insure that the contract 
entered into pursuant to 
, this advertisement will be 
awarded to the lowest 
responsible bidder without 
discrimination on the 
ground of race, color or 
national origin. 

By Order of 

Pat Anderson, 

Avon Township 

Highway Commissioner 

May 15, 

22,1986 

586C-487-GL/RL 



;1x2 

• Sounds like 

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41 newspaper talk lor < 
a one column by 2- < 
- Inch ad. Too small ( 

lo bo eHectlvo? ( 
You're reading this 

• anel ' 



Third 



by GARY S.MEYERS 

Baseball cards are the 
third most collected item in 
America, right behind coins 
and 'stamps. Investments 
here can be very small, but 
profits can nin 200 to 300 per- 
cent, 

"Kids of all ages collect 
and trade cards. Famous 
collectors include Gary Car- 
ter (N ; Y. Mets catcher), 
Chico Rush and Jerry Sloan 
(former Chicago Bulls 
guard)," said Bruce Gold, 
manager of A U Sports 
Memorabilia, a Chicago 
baseball card dealer. "It 
only takes 35 cents to start a 
collection, but the more you 
invest, the more your in- 
vestment can grow." 

The value of baseball car- 
ds is determined by supply . 
and demand, who the player 
is, and the card's condition. • 

To have real value, most 
cards have to be in mint con- 
dition. This means that the 
card is in the same condition 
as new, when it first came 
out of the package. It can 
have no creases, no folds and 
both front and back should 
be centered, and of course no 
sticky bubble gum. 
. Currently, the most 
valuable cards are Mickey 
Mantle, from any year, and 
the Pete Rose Rookie card" 
In 1979 the Rose Rookie card 
was worth S3, Now it is worth 
$400. Mantle can drive in bet- 
ween |250 and $400. 

A Willie Mays Rookie card 
(1952) is worth between $450 
and $500, while Hank 
Aaron's Rookie card (1954) 
is worth $175. \ 

Rookie cards in general 
are the most valuable 
because they are a gamble, 
like the rookies themselves. 

Sets of cards also have 
value. The number of cards 
in a set depends on the 
manufacturer. There are 
only three manufacturers of 
baseball cards. The largest, 
Tops Baseball Cards, has 
been in business since the. 




Item 



early 1950's. The other two 
manufacturers are Donruss 
and Fleer. 

Fleer suspended produc- 
tion in the mid-1960s and 
resumed in 1981. Donruss, 
the late comer to the field, 
began printing in 1981. 

In a Tops set there are 792 
cards, consisting of one card 
for each player in the league, 
plus additional "collectors 
cards," including fathers 
and sons who played major 
league baseball. 

Tops issues an updated set 
at the end of the season that 
adjusts for trades and 
players that have been 
brought up from the minor 
leagues. (The 1984 updated 
set is more valuable than the 
original because of Dwight 
Gooden. His Rookie Card is 
included in the updated set. 
It is already worth $6.) 

A Tops' set currently sells 
for $20. The Donruss 
Highlight Set is selling for 
$35, because they limited 
production to create 
demand. Most collectors buy 
already completed collected 
sets. The alternative, buying 
packs .of gum, would cost 
between $40 and $50 to try 
and collect a complete set. 

Marianne Sorn, manager 
of Family Coins, a Chicago 
dealer in collector's items, 
speculates that Donruss will 
continue to limit production 
on future sets. 

During the first seven 
years or so the appreciation 
on sets is slow, but then they 
move. 

VFor the first seven years, 
you? can expect to see only 
about a 20 percent profit," 
said Bruce Gold. 

One notable exception is 
the 1975 Tops set, which in- 
cludes the Rookie cards of 
many superstars like George 
Brett and Keith Hernandez. 
In 1975 the set cost $7.50; ten 
years later it is worth $250. 
That's a 3,233 percent ap- 
preciation in value (unad- 
justed for inflation) . 



OTHER WAYS TO 
COLLECT. Besides sets, . 
collectors follow a player's 
career, or they can buy and 
trade for all the players for a 
single team for a few 
seasons in a row. 

Fraud happens more often 
than dealers would like 
because baseball cards are 
fairly easy to reproduce. 
But, counterfeits are also 
pretty easy to detect. The 
most recent fraud was an at- 
tempt to fake the Pete Rose 
Rookie Card. However, it 
was a little greenish in color 
and off center. 

To buy new baseball cards 
you just go into the corner 
drug or candy store. For 
older cards, there are card 
shows every week and 
regional and national con- 
ventions. You can also find 
what you want through ads 
in the publications and 
magazines for baseball card 
collectors and at auctions. 

The most valuable cards 
are sold at auctions, where 
their prices may greatly 
fluctuate. 

In the late 19th century 
and the early 20th century all 
kinds of manufacturers 
made baseball cards. These 
cards still are traded, but 
because the vintage cards 
are so rare, few people can 
afford to collect them (i.e. 
the supply is limited but so is 
the demand). 

A baseball collector's 
price guide is available from 
Edgewater Book Co. Inc. in 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

There are two annual - 
publications, the Sports 
America Baseball Card 
Price Guide goes back to the 
1800s. It retails for $11.95. 
The other publication only 
goes back to 1952 and costs 
$4.95. In addition, Beckett-" 
Publishers provides the 
Beckett Baseball Card Mon- 
thly, costing $2.50, giving 
news and updates on the 
prices. 




Every bod/ Reads 

Lakeland Want Ads 




288lak*kand Newspapers 



A - :i .O ,;,:,„., , Thursday May 15, 1986 



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TM PLATES 1ST PAYMENT AND SIMllAR SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED^- 



Lakeland Newtpap«r» 15A 



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Thursday May 15, 1986 




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* 



Time To Reflect Hospitals' Role 



by KENNETH C. ROBBINS 
(President Illinois Hospital Assn.) 
This is Hospital Week nationally and in 

Illinois. 

It is an appropriate time for us to reflect 
on our hospitals and the role they play in 
our lives and the contributions they make 
to our communities. 

Most of us are born in hospitals. Most of 
us will spend our final hours in a hospital 
bed. In between, we experience some of 
life's greatest joys-and sorrows-in a 
hospital environment. 

When we are not in need of the care they 
provide, we may tend to take hospitals for- 
granted, as we do other- necessities of life. 
We rarely consider what it would be like 
without them. 

Because they are always there. 

But these day nothing can be taken for 
granted, least of all our health care in- 
stitutions. For they are under attack. 

During the prosperous and optimistic 
days of the 1950s and 1960s, we granted to 
the poor and the elderly-the most 
vulnerable among us-the right to health 
care under the Medicaid and Medicare 
programs. 

And we expanded the health care 
delivery system to meet this com- 
passionate social objective. We invested in 
bricks and mortar, and in technology-and 
in the final analysis, in people. 

And we reaped wonderful social rewards 
in human terms. We live longer. The 
quality of life is improved. Infant mor- 
tality rates have been halved. The gap of 
lifespan between socio-economic classes is 
narrowed. Diseases which once plagued us 
are gone. 



But in the economic turbulence of the 
1970s, we began to question every major 
allocation of social resources, including 
our health care investment. We began as a 
society to tighten the lid. 

We put cost-containment at the top of our 
priority list for public policy on health 
care. Access to care and quality of care 
were relegated to a lesser status. 

At the national level, we put limits on 
what we would pay for services to the 
elderly. In Illinois, we see tight contracts 
for discounted rates and more limited 
choices for the poor. Similar 
arrangements were replicated in the 
private sector, squeezing our health 
resources to the limit. 

The pendulum has swung swiftly and 
relentlessly toward cost containment-and 
away from concerns for access and quality 
of care. ", 

What have we achieved? On the positive 
side, we have saved millions of dollars for 
Illinois 1 taxpayers and health care con- 
sumers. Admission rates and lengths of 
stay are down; provision of care in low- 
cost outpatient settings is dramatically 
increased. We have created a leaner 
health care system 

But nothing is gainedfor nothing. 

In down-scaling our health care system, 
we have put 25,000 hospital employees out 
of work-in Illinois alone-since 1982. And 
we have strained the ability of our 
hospitals to provide services. 

We have become accustomed to the 



There's Onlff One Expert 

On Cancer Insurance. The 

Person Who Has Used It. 

"My darling 
Bert, never 
thought it could 
happen to him" 

Albert & Lor.tU Block 

Cancer Not Only Affects The Person, It 
Affects The Whole Family. 

For more information call: 

Maggie Shuster, District Representative 

American Family 
Life Assurance 

(312)623-4230 

Specializing In Cancer And Intensive Care 
Supplemental Benefits 





Career Opportunities A variable 



hospitals of this state providing $300 
million to $400 million in care every year to 
the medically indigent-those not destitute 
enough or old enough to qualify for 
government-paid care, but unable to meet 
their own needs. 

Hospitals are today hard-pressed to 
meet their mission of providing care to all 
who need it regardless of ability to pay. 
Some hospitals in Illinois have closed their 
doors. Others can be expected to follow. 

There is concern all about for the quality 
of care our institutions are able to provide, 
about the possibility that our elderly are 
released from hospitals in a "quicker but 
being forced by economic pressures to be 



sicker condition." 

Upon analysis, these fears seem 
groundless today. But they reflect an 
understanding that when the pressure 
increases, the most vulnerable of us are 
the ones who will be squeezed out of the 
health care svstem. 

Think about our hospitals this week. 
They have been with us always. But the 
tension of today's debate about access and 
quality-versus-cost containment has made 
vulnerable and uncertain that which we 
have come to take for granted. The 
assumption that when we need them most, 
hospitals will be there. Actions we take 
today will determine the validity of that 
assumption tomorrow. 



Live With Pain? NAPRAPATHY 

Get relief from 1907-1986 



•Back Pain 




•Allergies 


•Joint Pain 


•Arthritis 


•Numbness 


•Chronic Disorders 


•Scoliosis 


•Digestive Disorders 


•Sciatica 


•Headaches 


•Sports Injury 



Libertyville Naprapathy 
Clinic 

Dan Young, D.N. , M.S. 

21 5 Peterson Road 
Libertyville, IL 

(312)367-1700 





— /-■— — — ~ — — - — 

Nothing hurts more than 

SORE FEET 

STOP SUFFERING FROM ANNOYING FOOT PAIN! 
PROCEDURES ARE NOW AVAIIABLE TO COR- 
RECT YOUR FOOT PROBIEMS 

Some Common Foot Problems 



BUNION 



Round Lake Foot Clinic 

Dr. Ronald J . Clemente 

Foot Specialist Podiatrist 

221 W. Washington 
Round Lake, IL 60073 

CALL TODAY 

(312)546-8555 



M 



it 



Mayor 

May 15, 1986 
5S6C-494-RL 



26B lakeland Newspaper! 



Grant Township 
Highway Commissioner 

May 15, 1986 
586C-495FL 



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Thursday May 15, 1966 



Lakeland Newspapers 30 



Research Indicates Foods Protect Your Teeth 



New research indicates that certain 
foods may be protective to your 
teeth— that is, they inhibit the formation of 
acids that cause cavities. 

"Milk and all milk products afford a 
certain amount of this protection," says 
Dr. John J. Hefferen, director of the 
American Dental Assn. Health Foundation 
Institute. '!Milk on cereal inhibits the acid- 
forming potential of the cereal. If you must 
eat sweets between meals, wash them 
down with a glass of milk." 

Of all the milk products, certain cheeses 
afford the most protection to the teeth. 
Says Hefferen, "Recent research has 
shown that Swiss cheese and Monterey 
Jack may counter the effects of acids 
produced by plaque. Best of all is aged 
Cheddar, perhaps because its sharp taste 
promotes saliva flow." There appear to be 
other decay-inhibiting ingredients in these 
cheeses, and researchers are currently 
investigating these and other "protective" 
foods. 



At present, dental researchers agree 
that certain categories of foods cause 
cavities. "We'll soon know more," syas 
Dr. William E. Rogers, chief ofthe Caries 
and Restorative Materials Branch of the 
National Institute of Dental Research. "In 
three or four years we'll know the cavity- 
causing potential of a wide variety of 
natural foods. As for packaged foods, we'll 
be able to test them and perhaps label 
certain products 'Safe For Teeth,' as the 
Swiss do." 

Of course,^ ood dental health depends on 
more, than diet. Brush teeth thoroughly at 
least once a day with a fluoride toothpaste, 
and preferably after each meal. Floss 
teeth daily to remove plaque around the 
gumline, andvisit the dentist regularly. 

A key nutrient to dental health, is 
calcium: Children and adolescents need 
extra calcium to ensure the formation of 
strong, healthy teeth. But pregnant women 
need extra calcium, too, to ensure the 
proper development of their, unborn 



babies' teeth. 

The heed for extra calcium diminishes 
after adolescence, but emerges again later 
in life. In fact, calcium deficiency is one 
cause of osteoporosis, a disease charac- 
terized by loss of bone density. 
Osteoporosis affects 25 percent of white 
women over 65 years of age and 10 percent 
of men. The end result is brittle bones that 
break easily. Some researchers believe 



that osteoporosis of the jawbone may 
cause tooth loss and problems in the fitting 
of dentures. <, 

Dairy products are the richest sources of 
calcium, but fruits and vegetables also 
contain some calcium, especially kale, 
collard greens and spinach. Canned 
salmon and sardines with edible bones are 
excellent nondairy sources. 



Think Before Snacking 



If one must snack, here are some tips: 

Avoid sticky foods. Raisins, dates, figs, 
bananas, dried fruits, and chewy candies 
such as caramels and toffee cting to teeth, 
and as long as particles remain on the 
teeth, the acid attack will continue. 

Because they remain in the mouth, hard 
candies, cough drops and breath mints 
prolong an acid attack, as does the 



frequent consumption of soft drinks. If you 
must consume soft drinks, choose the 
sugar-free variety; artificial sweeteners 
are harmless to teeth. 

Between meals, it's best to choose 
nonsugary, nonstarchy snacks. Fruits and 
raw vegetables, cheese, hardboilcd eggs, 
leftover cooked meat, peanuts, olives, 
cottage cheese, and yogurt are excellent 
choices. 



Volunteer Work Aids Rehabilitation 



by SUSAN MONTGOMERY 

He says he. can't do all that he used to, 
but for others at Condell Hospital, Chris 
Hinrichsen is like a God-send. v' 

The 34-year-old Mundelein resident 
volunteers at the hospital four clays a week 
helping out wherever he is most needed. 
The work keeps him running between the 
medical records and physical therapy 
departments where he files records to 
doing repair work on wheelchairs. 

Those working in the hospital's volun- 
teer services office are thankful not only 
for the number of hours Hinrichsen 
donates, but also for the sense of humor 
and warm, friendly attitude he exudes. 

"He has a wonderful sense of humor," 
said Mary Francoeur, the hospital's volun- 
teer services director. "He sees whatever 
work needs to be done, and goes ahead and 
does it. 

Considering the obstacles he has over- 
come during the past few years, it's clear 
that his work as a volunteer holds a special 
place in Hinrichsen's life. 



to prove those predictions wrong. Through 
extensive physiotherapy at the 
Rehabilitation Institute in Chicago; he 
worked to regain the use of his legs and his 
ability to speak which had also been im- 
paired during the accident. 

Nine months ago, he-approached Fran- 
coeur with the idea of designing his own 
volunteer program at Condell, an 
arrangement which both see as mutually 
beneficial. For himself, Hinrichsen not 
only enjoys the daily interaction with the 
hospital staff, but is also in a setting that 
requires him to practice communication 
skills. 

"Volunteering gives me a sense of 
fulfillment," he said, adding, 'ill's like an 
extension of my old job." 

With, that type of determination, says 
Condell's speech pathologist, Kim Broy, 
Hinrichsen has made remarkable 
progress in relearning how to articulate 
certain sounds. 

While Hinrichsen's speaking ability con- 
tinues to improve, Broy noted that the 



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Volunteer At Work 

Mundelein resident Chris Hinrichsen (left) takes time out of a hectic day as a 
volunteer at Condell Memorial Hospital in Liberty vi Me to work with Condell's 
Speech Pathology Dir . Kim Broy on developing language skills to help overcome 
a speech difficulty resulting from a car accident. Hinrichsen now volunteers 
four days a week at the hospital. 



Three years ago, Hinrichsen, then an 
ambitious advertising executive in 
Chicago, was severely injured in a car ac- 
cident that left him in a coma for nine 
weeks. When he finally regained con- 
ciousness, doctors had little hope of him 
ever walking again. , 

Hinrichsen's determination prevailed. 

Over the next several months, he set out 



most radical progress is generally made 
between the first three to six months 
following an accident. 

"You have to remember, though, that he 
started with nothing," she said. From that 
extreme to being able to' understand what 
people are saying to producing single wor- 
ds and phrases, communication skills con- 
tinue to progress, she said. 



As far as Hinrichsen's ability to com- 
municate with the staff, both Broy and 
Francoeur chuckled. 

"The thing is that Chris has such a won- 
derful sense of humor and an outstanding 
vocabulary. He catches you off guard 
when you're not expecting him to make a 
joke," Francoeur said. 

One such example is when Hinrichsen 
described the frustration he feels when the 
rehabilitative process seems to be moving 
too slowly. 

"There is more than one way to skin the 
cat," he joked. "If 1 can't figure out how to 
do somethng one way, there are o there 
avenues I can take," he said. . 

Feelings of frustration on the part of 
both the family and patient are quite nor- 
mal, Broy reassured. In some cases, a 
patient .may go through behavioral 
changes which are not always understood 
by the family. 

From time to time during his 
rehabilitation; Hinrichsen still goes 
through short periods of frustration. The 
emotional strain is part of the normal ad- 
justment process a patient may ex- 
perience, Broy said. 

Patience, Hinrichsen believes, has 
helped guide him through the difficult 



"I can't do all I used to do. (The 
has made me slow down," he 



process. 

accident) 

1 said. 

But, he added, not taking the easy way 
out, and setting_goals for himself have 
helped him to readjust. "And I've still got 
this," he said, pointing to his head. 

His independence and clearly ambitious 
approach toward rehabilitation has won 
the admiration of other hospital em- 
ployees. 

With a twinkle in his eye, Hinrichsen 
confessed that he is still a ladies' man, a 
remark that again drew a chuckle from 
Francoeur. 

"I never told Chris this story before," 
she starts out, "but the day he arrived, 
some other employees were going to take 
him to lunch. But he disappeared and I 
became concerned when we couldn't find 
him." 

"I eventually found him in the cafeteria 
surrounded by a group of women," she 
laughed. 

While Hinrichsen emphasized that 
"anyone could fit in" that setting, Fran- 
coeur admitted Hinrichsen's special type 
of volunteer program would be difficult to 
duplicate. 



Slate Pressure Testing 



On May 16 through 18, Saint Therese 
Medical Center • will offer free blood 
pressure screening and bike egometer 
tests at the Lakehurst Mall i neon junction 
with National Hospital Week. 

Friday May, 16 free blood sugar tests 
will be offered by technicians from the 
hospital's laboratory. On Saturday, May 
17, nutritional information and services 
department and bio-dot stress indicators 
will be distributed by education and com- 
munity outreach services. 

Hospital services offering information at 



the Lakehurst exhibit May 16-18, include: 
healthLine, radiology, home health, 
surgery, critical care unit, hospice, 
pediatrics and young adults, oncology and 
hematology, obstetrics, medical records, 
pharmacy, rehablitation services, 
emergency services and skilled nursing 
unit. 

Activities at the hospital during National 
Hospital Week include free blood pressure 
screening in the lobby on Friday, May 16, 
from medical center's volunteer corps. 

This year's national theme is "Hosptials 
Make Healthy Neighbors." 



To Introduce New Series 
At Condell Hospital May 19 



"Stepping Out," a new series of 
mother/baby exercise classes will be in- 
troduced by Condell Memorial Hospital 
beginning with the first session, Monday, 
May 19, at The Family Health Cen- 
ter... Hawthorn at Sue Phillip Rd. ( Vernon 
Hills. 

In response to numerous requests, the 
hospital designed the program specially 
for babies, four to nine months of age. The 
classes will be taught by physical 
therapists with backgrounds in early child 
development and obstetrics/gynecology. 

This program provides an opportunity to 
stimulate a baby's normal development in 



an atmosphere of education and fun. 
Special baby massage techniques promote 
bonding with the parent and enhance body 
awareness. A variety of exercises also will 
help the mother improve muscle tone after 
childbirth while facilitating baby's 
physical coordination. 

Classes will meet for six weeks from 9 : 30 
a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Monday and Thursday. 
The cost of this program is $40. The first 
session held May 10 will be a free in- 
troductory class. 

Enrollment will be limited. To register, 
call the physical therapy department at 
(312) 680-1092. 




Lakeland Newspapers 1 5 A 



Thursday May 15. 1966 



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There's Nothing More Special Than Your Family 
That's Why We Built A Special Place for Them. 



The Family Health Center. . .Hawthorn 

In Vernon Hills 



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Now there is a very special place in your community commit- 
ted to improving and safeguarding the health of your entire family. 

Housed in one convenient, modem facility you'll find all the 
resources you need to keep your family healthy and fit, and that 
means everything from Immediate care for minor medical 
emergencies, to sophisticated equipment and treatment for out- 
patient therapy. 

IMMEDIATE CARE — For minor 
medical emergencies, the Immediate Care 
Center is open from eight am 'til ten p.m.. 
seven days a week. Medical attention is 
given at a cost that is much less than that 
of hospital emergency rooms. 
Phone 680-0500. 

VERY IMPORTANT EXECUTIVE 
(V.I.E.) PROGRAM — 
Forward thinking corporations offer this 
service to their executives with the knowl- 
edge that healthy employees are more 
productive and can better cope with the 
stresses inherent in their jobs. 

THE HELPING HAND — The Helping Hand provides 
services when you or a family member are recuperating at home. 
This assistance includes private duty care, the CARE-VAN, leased 
or purchased medical equipment, and modified diets to prepare 
at home. (For information call 367-5750) 



WELLNESS PROGRAMS — The Community' Room 
is available for exercise classes and health information classes and 
lectures. Local organizations may arrange to hold meetings here 
at regular Intervals. 

ORTHOPEDIC REHABILITATION — Some of the 
most sophisticated equipment and treatments are available for 
outpatients at the Orthopedic Rehabilitation Center. 




PHYSICIANS' OFFICES — Several specialists on The 
Medical Center of Lake County's Staff have opened convenient 
offices In'the new facility to address'mTT health care needs of area 
residents. 



; 



For a brochure detailing all programs and services, please phone: 
(312)680-0500. ^^ 

CD 

The Medical Center of Lake County V/ 

subsidiary: Condell Memorial Hospital • Libertyville 



SFTTING THF PACE IN -HEALTH CARE 







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People To Hospitals 



by GLORIA DAVIS 

When people move into a new area, the 
location of the nearest and best hospital 
and a physician's and dentist's office are 
two of the first things they look for besides 
schools, shopping and churches. 

Some procrastinators wait until they are 
in need of immediate medical attention 
and then rush to the emergency entrance 
of the closest hospital or medical center. A 
practice which can prove to be rather 
expensive in the long run, insurance or no 
insurance. 

The more organized talk to neighbors, 
people they work with( if they are em- 
■ ployed near home), or call the local village 
or town hall or local Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Most municipalities do not like to 
recommend a physician because everyone 
has their own wants and need in that vein 
and they are not a medical referral ser- 
vice. 

Normally a general medical practioner 
is found first and then the hospital choice 
becomes a particular one or more, 
depending on where their chosen doctor is 
on staff. 

People usually prefer to frequent the 
closest hospital in their area, all things 
being equal and the doctor of their choice 
is on the staff of more than one hospital. 

A close hosiptal is preferred in case of 
emergency and for the convenience of 
family "visitors if some member is 
hospitalized. 



Contacting local Chambers of Com- 
merce which may have doctors in their 
memberships, getting a hold of the area 
Welcome Wagon representative who 
might have those little helpful bits of in- 
formation right at their fingertips, are two 
other avenues that can be pursued , 

Many towns and villages have clubs 
devoted to welcoming new people such as 
the Newcomers Club of Lake Villa Twp. 
Representatives of that club claim that 
they seldom get a request for this kind of 
information since most people depend on 
"word of mouth. 

Besides the advertising in local 
newspapers that doctors do now, one of the 
best places to get the name of a physician 
is by calling the Lake County Physician 
Referal Service at (312)680-9530. 

A short explanation of one's medical 
needs will bring a list of doctors,. their 
- locations and phone numbers. 

A more impersonal way to chose both a 
doctor and a hospital is to check the yellow 
pages of the local phone bbok, although the 
doctors and hospitals that have names that 
start witlrthe first letters of the alphabet 
get most of that business. 

Area newspapers are filled with 'press 
releases' sent out by hospitals telling of the 
extracurricular services offered. 

This often draws the attention of the new 
people on the block. 

But the way most newcomers chose 
medical services is still through the 
personal recommendation of a new found 
friend. 







rx n r-> Podiatrist 

*Jb\. d\.cn. 9 J E*.ais Foot Surgeon 



Board Certified In 
Pediatric Surgery 
and Orthopedics 



Diplomate American 
Board Of Ambulatory 

Foot Surgery 

Diplomate American 

Board of Podiatric 

Orthopedics 



Foot Surgery Performed 
In A Very Pleasant Environment 

• In Office 

• Hawthorn Surgical Center 

Go Home Immediately After Surgery 



MEDICARE AND MOST 
MEDICAL 
INSURANCES 
ARE ACCEPTED 



If You Have A 
Foot Problem 

Call Us 
(312)223-0586 



33433 N. Sears Blvd. 
In Wildwood, IL 




FAMILY & EMERGENCY CENTER 

Announcing... 

The Primary Care Family 
and Emergency Center now open to serve ail of 
your health care needs in a way they've never been 
served before* 

Primary Care* is Nearby 



When you need quality care close to 
home, we have three ' convenient loca- 
tions in Lake County. You will find 
Primary Care Centers open evenings on 
weekdays and> tor your convenience, 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends. 
Primary Care gives you quality when and 
where you need it most. 




Covering All Of Your Health 

Needs 



Your family's health is our only con- 
cern—that is why each Primary Care 
Center is composed of the finest physi- 
cians, nurses and technicians available. 




Family Pnciin 

Internal Madfclrw 

Industrial Mtdklna 

Emflfotney Car* 



Pediatrics 

Orthopt dies . 

Minor Surgery' 

Parairt Education 

Lab And X-ray Sarvicas 



At Primary Care, we pledge to provide 
you with the. best care while keeping your 
costs down. . 



You and Your Loved Ones 
Deserve The Best 



Constantly bringing you the best in health 
care, Primary Care has added Board Cer- 
tified Family Physicians Dr. Steven A 
Portes and Dr. David Soo to its fine staff. 
Visit the Primary Care Center nearest you 
.and discover what this concept in health 
care can mean for you and your family. . 




An Invitation from 

Primary Care H 

We want you to get acquainted. Please bring this special in- 
vitation to the Primary Care Center near you and we'll give 
you $10 off your first. get acquainted visit. Offer expires May 

31 ' 1986 LIBERTYVILLE 



Lakewood Medical Building 

Route 1 , Box 351 

Route 45 North of 137 

Liberlyvllle, IL 60048 

- {312)362-9050- 



ANTIOCH 

915Taft 

AnliochJL 60002 

(312) 395-9180 



GURNEEfWAUKEGAN 

RL41 &DelaneyRd. 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

(312) 244-4190 



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TAX;PLATECrST PAYMENT AND SIMILAR SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED^ 



LARRY RYAN 



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Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 5A 






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Thursday May 15, 1986 



Health Clinic Accomodates Lake Countians 



Lake County finally has: a health clinic 
that can take care of the whole family's 
health needs quickly, easily, with no hassle 
in one stop. From family practice to 
cardiovascular surgery, from pediatrics to 
chiropractic, from preventive dentistry to 
oral surgery — North Point Medical and 
Dental Center has doctors ready to help; 
all one has to do is reach for the phone and 
dial (312) 872-8722. 

'William Relyea, M.D., is a general 
surgeon specializing in family health care 
and gynecology. Dr. Relyea has been in 
family practice for 25 years and un- 
derstands the almost daily attention a 
family needs for good health. 

Two pediatricians are in the clinic to 
help children from infancy through 
adolescence, whether it be for vaccination, 
school physicals, the sniffles or allergies. 
Dr. Albino Bismonte, Jr., and Dr. Nenita 
Saclolo provide excellent pediatric care. 
TLC is their specialty. According to Dr. 
Bismonte, "When we treat a child, we help 
the mother, the father, the grandparents 
— we are helping the whole family. It is the 
family we treat." 

Dr. Bismonte's arrival at the clinic is a 
return to Zion where he started his 
practice 15 years ago. "I'm very glad to be 
coming home," said Bismonte, 
"especially to such a fine place as this." 

Good health comes in many forms and 
one of those is the skeletal and muscular 
manipulation of the chiropractor. Dr. 
James Rosenberg specializes in sports 



injuries as well as the physical difficulties 
of youth and age. "I enjoy working with 
older people because chiropractic is an 
effective means of keeping them mobile, 
and reducing pain," Dr. Rosenberg says, 
"while working with young people gives 
me the opportunity to prevent future 
complications by correcting problems 
before they become permanent. 
Chiropractic has a very important place in 
medical care." 



Heart disease is still the biggest health 
problem in the United States. Dr. Timothy 
Ryan, board-certified general surgeon 
with specialty training in vascular 
surgery, works with patients in preventing 
strokes and heart disease. Dr. Ryan, for 
example, can do a complete vascular 
screening non-invasively. . Dr. Ryan has 
also perfected a new procedure for 
eliminating varicose veins without 
surgery. The procedure is simple, quick, 
painless, and inexpensive. It is a long 
overdue solution to a nagging and un- 
sightly problem. 



Complete dental care is provided by Drs. 
Gorchow and Cimmarusti. Dr. Gorchow 
speaks positively of the thorough work of 
his dental team. "We explain every detail 
to our patients and then decide together 
the treatment they will receive from us." 
Possible procedures include fillings, 
crowns, bridges,^ root canal therapy, 
periodontal therapy, bonding and cosmetic 
dentistry, and minor orthodontics. 

Judy Gray, M.S., N.T., is a fully 




Dr. Rosenberg eases muscular tension \w a patient. 




Dr. Ryan explains the new procedure for treating varicose veins. 



qualified and experienced nutritionist. 
Judy works closely with the doctors in 
analyzing blood and urine samples for 
possible diet deficiencies. She also works 
on a one-to-one basis with patients in the 
treatment of such problems as 
osteoporosis, PMS (premenstrual syn- 
drome), as well as ordinary dietary' 
problems. She says, "People are often 
surprised at how much better they feel 
when they make a few simple changes in 
eating habits.'* Recently Gray worked 
with the Zion-Benton basketball team on a 
nutritional program designed to help 
players with stamina and proper diet. 



North Point is the first total care out- 
patient clinic in the area, according to 
Robert Mayo, clinic administrator. "The 
governing board of this affiliate of 
American International Hospital gave us 
the resources and instructed me to put 
together the most aggressive health care 
clinic for the people of northeast Illinois. 
The care you receive here at the clinic, as 
well as the. hospital, is unmatched 
anywhere," said Mayo. "This organization 
is finally getting the recognition it 
deserves as a health care provider, 
responsive to the needs of the people it 
serves. 




Dr. Bismonte communicates with children in their own language. 



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May 1 5, 1 986 
586C-494-RL 



28B Lakeland Newspapers 



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Athletes 



Lakeland Newspapers 7D 




(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following in- 
formation has been provided by Dr. Jack 
Chuleiigarian with offices located in 
Grayslake and Waukegan. ) 

The human foot is a marvelous in- 
strument and when in perfect alignment 
and balance, there is no feat of endurance 
which it cannot handle, even on a regular 
basis. However, structural imbalance 
even in minute degrees can result in per- 
sistent injuries' and incapacitating 
disability. Prevention of sports injuries is 
best accomplished through alignment and 
balance of the musculoskeletal structures, 
beginning with the foot. Many times an in- 
jury is preceeded by the wearing down of a 
regular training shoe. Changing shoe gear 
can also cause difficulties as can a change 
in activity surface. 

Shin splints is generally referred to as an 
over-use injury in which the muscles on 
the front of the leg are microscopically 
pulled away from their bony attachments 
resulting in pain. This inflammatory 
process can occur in any. sport and is 
usually seen in unconditioned athletes, a 
change in footwear, an increase in jum- 
ping, a . change in sports events or 
repetitive running on a hard surface. 
Treatment consists of ice massage and is 
particularly, important after exercise. 
Workouts should be limited to pain toleran- 
ce and carried out on a soft surface. Most 
long-term cases of shin splints are an in- 
dication of a foot imbalance. 

Another sports related injury to the foot 
is commonly referred to as a stress frac- 
ture. It is usually caused by repetitive 
trauma on a portion of bone causing a 
hairline break. Pain and swelling of the 
foot is gradual, but aggravated by activity 
and relieved by rest. Although x-rays 
taken at the time of trauma may fail to 
reveal a fracture, healing of the bone will 



The Foot Doctor Very Busy 



be seen in x-rays taken approximately 
three weeks later. Treatment consists of 
reducing activity and supportive taping of 
the foot. In most cases of stress fracture, 
this treatment will allow healing of the 
fracture. 

Strains are a tear in a ligament from 
overstretching or the forcing of a joint 
through a wider range of motion than it is 
capable. The inversion sprain is the most 
common and is caused by a turning inward 
of the ankle joint and hyperex tension of the 
ligaments on the outside of the ankle. If 
you sustain an injury that requires 
medical attention, stay off it until it can be 
examined by a doctor, especially if you 
hear a "snap" or tear. The ankle should be 
packed in ice immediately to reduce 
bleeding and swelling. Your podiatrist will 
take x-rays of your ankle to be sure there 
are no fractured bones. He will examine 
the area for any ruptured ligaments or ten- 
dons. Should he determine a sprain, you 
will probably be instructed in a treatment 
regimen to include rest, ice, compression 
and elevation of the ankle and, if 
necessary, medication to reduce pain and 
inflammation. In some cases, complete 
immobilization is necessary. 

The purpose of the Achilles tendon is to 
connect the muscles in the calf of the leg to 
the heel. This tendon is often a source of in- 
jury because of its location and function. 
Strain is a common injury. Occasionally, 
chronic strain may result in calcification 
within the tendon. The Achilles is the most 
common tendon in the foot and ankle 
region .to rupture spontaneously, often 
because of unaccustomed strenuous 
physical activity. There is a sudden sharp 
pain in the back of the ankle and, 
sometimes, an audible sound. Ice should 
be applied immediately and the patient 
should use crutches until he is examined 
by a podiatrist. 



Pain beneath the heel bone or within the 
arch area of the foot is an extremely corn- 
mom and often debilitating condition. Pain 
in the heel of the foot is usually a result of 
direct or indirect trauma (a constant and 
repetitive irritation which progresses in 
severity without treatment) .This kind of 
pain is usually attributable to swelling 
around the nerve on the bottom of the heel. 
This swelling may also be due to a heel 
spur or a pinched nerve. Pain across the 
bottom of the foot can be a symptom of a 
stretched ligament. Sometimes heel and 
arch pain is a combination of all three. The 
first, step in treatment can be tried at 
home. Often relief can be attained by pad- 
ding the area with a soft foam rubber 
material, shoes with a thick rubber heel 
and ice against the bottom of the heel to 
reduce swelling. If these measures fail, it 



is time to consult your podiatrist. Initial 
treatment is directed at relieving the sym- 
ptoms. Often this is accomplished with 
new non-cortisone oral medications. 
Sometimes injection of medications direc- 
tly into the heel or sprained ligament is 
necessary for relief of symptoms. Other 
measures consist of relieving the strain of 
the heel and arch by means of padding, 
taping or use of a prescription orthotic 
device. 

We see the athlete as a special breed and 
feel that his foot and ankle problems 
should receive special attention. It is our 
intention to keep the athlete active in his 
sport while protecting him from further in- 
jury. Proper equipment and training, 
along with some simple precautions, can 
minimize the risks involved. 




inois Hospitals 
Prove Cost-Efficient 



Sixty-five years ago, a hospital 
magazine editor, Matthew A. Foley, 
established National Hospital Day "so that 
the community may know its hospital. 1 ' 

This year, during National Hospital Week, 
May 11-17, hospitals throughout the United 

States will reaffirm their community 
responsibilities, using the theme, 
"Hospitals Make Healthy Neighbors." 

Illinois hospitals, however, have proved 
to be cost-efficient as well as healthy 
neighbors, According to recent Illinois 
Hospital Assn. (IHA) statistics, hospitals 
in this state are continuing to contain costs 
at levels that are well below the national 
average. 



During the 1985 calendar year, the cost 
to patients for an average stay in an 
Illinois hospital increased 5.5 percent. 

That cost compares with an 8.9 percent in- 
crease nationwide. In 1985, patients also 

spent less time in hospitals. The average 
length of stay for an inpatient was 6.82 

days, a 2.2 percent decrease from 1984. 
Length of stay decreased 3 percent nation- 
wide. 

In addition, an increased interest in 
receiving medical care in low-cost en- 
vironments is also evident from IHS 
statistics. During 1985, outpatient visits in 
Illinois increased 13 percent. 




i « i • < 




als Make Healthy Neighboi 

During National Hospital Week 

Saint Therese Medical Center's Exhibit at 
Lakehurst Shopping Center 
May 16-1 7-1 8 

Free Blood Pressure Screening (Friday-Sunday) 

Egometer Bike Testing (Friday-Sunday) 

Free Blood Sugar Tests (Friday) 

Nutritional Info & Weight Check (Saturday) 

Bio-Dot Stress Indicators (Saturday) 

Demonstration of Orthotron Rehabilitation Device To Increase 

Muscle Strength (Sunday) 

Visit the Medical Center Lobby 

For 

Free Blood Pressure Screening 

Friday, May 16 
11 a.m. -2 p.m. 

safnt tbeRese 
m&oicol 




2615 Washington St. • Waukegan, IL 60085 • (312) 249-3900 






PAT BYAN 



ThursdayMay15.1986 



TAX7PLATES, 1ST PAYMENT AND SIMILAR SICUKMT UtfUill Ktvmittir 



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6D Lakeland Newspaper* 



Naprapath Trained 
To Analyze Imbalances 



Naprapathy is a scientific system of 
manipulation designed to release tension 
in the muscles and ligaments which "hold 
in balance" and support the spinal column. 
This science originated in 1906. Because 
muscle and ligament problems are not 
detectable by x-ray or other impersonal 
technical tests, the naprapath is highly 
trained to analyze softer connective tissue 
imbalances by physical testing. 

Through various forms of trauma, i.e., 
falls, slips, strained lifting, poor posture, 
sudden blows to the spine, etc., the 
muscles and ligaments become contracted 
and spasmed, placing the entire body in a 
state of imbalance, like a "wet rag" which 
has been rung or twisted. This puts 
pressure on or "pinches" the delicate 
nerves which pass between these struc- 
tures from this spinal of other joint area. 

Because the nervous system is the 
supreme coordinator of alt bodily func- 
tions, it is understandable that any 
irritation to these nerves could possibly 
cause physiological disturbances to the 
area where these "pinched" nerves lead. 

The naprapath has the knowledge and 
training to detect these contracted 
"knotted" muscles and ligaments and to 
release their points of tension; thus 
eliminating discomfort now, and possible 
problems that could arise in the future. 

Dr. Dan M. Young, D.N., has been 



practicing the science of naprapathy for 
the past seven years. He received his 
bachelor of science degree from the 
University of Illinois in 1974, master of 
science degree from Bernadean 
University and doctor of naprapathy 
degree from the Chicago National College 
of Naprapathy in 1979. For the past five 
years Dr. Young has been a member of the 
faculty of the above college. He is also a 
member of the American Naprapathic 
Assn., and founder and owner of the 
Libertyville Naprapathic Clinic. 

They types of approaches to orthopedic 
disorders used at the Libertyville 
Naprapathic Clinic include elec- 
trotherapy, ultrasound, traction, and 
orthopedic video tapes, in addition to the 
naprapathic manipulation. 

The demands of a growing practice 
necessitated the addition of Dr. Ken 
Hansen, D.N., three years ago. The 
Libertyville Naprapathic Clinic now 
employs, in addition to Drs. Young and 
Hansen, Dr. Szalowski, Dr. Bledsoe, and 
various interns from the naprapathic 
college. 

With demands for increasing space, the 
Libertyville Naprapathic Clinic will be 
moving to 283 Peterson Rd., Libertyville, 
in the new Peterson Commons Plaza, on 

June 2. 



Suntan Can Result 
In Problems Later 



Although many people look forward to 
summertime and the warm feeling of 
sunshine on their skin, the healthy glow of 
a suntan can lead later to a host of 
problems: dryness, wrinkles, liver spots 
and skin cancer. 

More than 400,000 cases of skin cancer 
are diagnosed each year. About 7,400 
deaths result annually. 

Victory Hospital's oncology (cancer) 
unit is sponsoring its second free skin 
cancer screening on Wednesday, May 28, 
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Appointments can be 
made by calling (312) 360-4246. 

During last year's skin cancer 
screening, Victory's physicians identified 
a number of suspicious lesions and in- 
dividuals were referred to their own 
doctors for follow-up. 

People with very fair complexions and 
light 'blue, green or grey) are most prone 
to overexposure to the sun and skin can- 
cer, But anyone who spends a great deal of 
time in thesun is at risk. 



There are several types of skin cancer. 
Some are easily treated. Some have poorer 
prognoses. 

The best precaution is to avoid 
overexposure. Staying out of the sun when 
it is at its most intense— between 10 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. is advisable. And sun wor- 
shippers should use a sunscreen lotion, 
cream or sun block. It should be used when 
persons are out of doors for an extended 
period, whether jogging, boating, gar- 
dening or swimming. 

But no sunscreen gives total protection. 
And even the darkest black skin is not 
immune to skin cancer or the sun's aging 
effects. And ultraviolet rays have a 
cumulative effect. So the bronze glow 
prized so highly by those in their younger 
years can result in sagging, wrinkled skin 
later, and can increase the chances of 
developing skin cancer. 

As the American Cancer Society warns, 
if you fry now, you'll pay later. 



Bozinis Pharmacies 

•Complete computerized pharmacy 
records for tax & insurance claims. 

•Instant prescription search when you do 
not have your number. 

•Sick room supplies. 

•Wheel chair & crutch rental. 

1721 Sheridan Road 
North Chicago, IL 

(For FREE Delivery Call) (312)689-3158 



ThurtdayMay15,l986 




ii 



if 



SHOW 'EM YOU CARE 

Special occasions and special people are 
best remembered by gifts chosen with 
special care. Lakehurst Mall's many fine 
shops and department stores know how 
to help you make the right choice for 
graduations, weddings, Father's Day and 
all the important days ahead. 

Show 'em you care with a gift from Lakehurst Mali. 

If you like feeling good, you're going 
to like Lakehurst's 

Health Fair 

Friday through Sunday 

This weekend, show 'em you care about 
your own good health. Come and talk 
with many health and fitness profes- 
sionals at Lakehurst Mall's Health Fair. 
Area hospitals, clinics, and health centers 
offer free tests for blood pressure, blood 
sugar, vision exams, cardiovascular 
health and more. The American Red Cross 
even has a blood drive on Sunday in the 
Lakehurst Community Room. 

Lakehurst wants to help you take better 
care of yourself. And what better gift 
could your loved ones ever receive? 

Show 'em how much you care. 



< ! 




One minute eail of lhe7ri-Stale/One mtnule west of Skokie Highway 
(Rt.4l) or Waukegan (Rl.43) and Belvidere Road* (Rt.l 20) Waukegan. 



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May 15, 19B6 
586C-494-RL 



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New Program Reduces 




' 'Everything causes cancer ! ' ' 

"I love having a suntan. There's no way 
something as healthy as the sun can give 
you cancer I" 

"I've been a smoker for 15 years. It's too 
late for me to do anything to avoid lung 
cancer." 

These statements about cancer have two 
things in common: First, they relect an 
attitude of helplessness regarding cancer 
prevention and, second, they are all in- 
correct. Unfortunately, though, this sense 
of inevitability is common, despite the 
many advances in the fight against can- 
cer. 

To dispel this mistaken sence of 
hoelessness, the American Cancer Society 
has announced a new public ' education 
program, "Taking Control," which offers 
10 simple steps people can take now to 
reduce their risk of getting cancer, and 
possibly prevent the disease. 

•"Taking Control' is one of our most 
significant programs to date because it 
represents the Society's new emphasis on 
cancer prevention," said Charles A. 
LeMaistre, M.D., the incoming president 
of the Society. 

"Most scientists now believe that our 
daily habits— what we eat and drink, 
whether- we smoke and how often we ex- 
pose ourselves to the sun— determine to a 
great extent our risk of getting, many 



cancers," he said. "All of these factors can 
be controlled easily. We have the power to 
lessen our chances of getting this disease." 
"Taking Control" is the first ACS 
program. to integrate all aspects of cancer 
prevention— diet, exercise and general 
health habits— into a program that can be 
adapted practically to one's lifestyle. It 
offers 10 steps— five habits to adopt and 
five to curtail— that have been proven 
through epidemiological studies and 
laboratory experiments to play a role in 
curtailing the development of certain 
cancers. 

The five "protective factors" are 
practices that should be adopted; the "risk 
factors" are habits that should, be cur- 
tailed or abandoned. 

"We know that a third of all cancer is 
linked to cigarette smoking. And other 
cancers, particularly breast, prostate and 
colon, are related to diet," said Dr. 
LeMaistre. "By cutting out smoking and 
eating more of the foods that may inhibit 
cancer, you can do a lot to reduce your 
risk." 

"Taking Control" offers these steps to 
reduce cancer risk: v 

Protective factors: 1. Increase con- 
sumption of fresh vegetables, especially 
those of the cabbage family, to inhibit 
cancer development and .growth. In ad- 



Awa rd KMH 's McG i n ty 



Kenosha Memorial Hospital President 
John McGinty has been selected as one of 
the health care industry's '- top young 
professionals by the American Hospital 
Association. 

McGinty was cited for having displayed 
exceptional innovation, leadership, vision 
and organizational abilities. He was selec- 
ted by a panel of experts from across the 
country. McGinty will be profiled in the 
50th Anniversary Issue of "Hospitals" 
magazine. 

McGinty came to Kenosha Memorial in 
1977 and was appointed president and chief 
executive officer in 1979. McGinty is a 
graduate of Carthage College and received 



his master's degree in hospital ad- 
ministration from Xavier University in 
Cincinnati.. 

He is a Fellowship Candidate in the 
American College of Healthcare 
Executives and has recently received 
other state and national awards as an out- 
standing administrator. 

Senior Club Meets 

Avon "55" Senior Social Club meetings are 
held at 7:30 p.m. on the second and fourth 
Mondays of each month, at Avon Twp. 
building, 433 E. Washington in' Round Lake 
Park. Upcoming events include . bowling, 
dancing, theater and all sorts of summer ac- 
tivities. 




A Man Of Many Roles 

Kim Broy (right), speech pathologist at Condell Memorial Hospital in Libertyville 
watches as hospital volunteer. Chris Hinrichsen (center) is helped into ms volun- 
teer jacket by Mary Francoeur, director of volunteer services at Condell 
Memorial Hospital in Libertyville. AMundelein resident, Hinrichsen plays many 
roles at the hospital, moving from one department to another to offer his ser- 



dition, vegetables will increase the intake 
of certain vitamins as well as provide 
increased dietary fiber. 

2. Add more dietary fiber. High-fiber 
diets seem to reduce the risk of developing 
certain cancers, such as cancer of the 
breast, prostate and colon. 

3. Increase intake of vitamin A. Cancers 
of the esophagus, larynx and lung may be 
avoided by increasing the intake of natural 
sources of this vitamin. 

4. Add more foods rich in vitamin C. 
Citrus fruits and vegetables rich in 
vitamin C may protect against cancer of 
the stomach and esophagus. 

5. Practice weight control. Obesity is 
linked to cancers of the uterus, 
gallbladder, breastand colon. 

Risk factors: 6. Reduce the amount of 
dietary fat. A high-fat diet increases risk 
of developing breast, colon and prostate 
cancers.. 

7. Cut down on salt-cured, smoked and 
nitrite-cured foods. Moderation in the 
consumption of these foods is recom- 
mended, since they, have been linked to 
cancers of the esophagus and stomach. 

8. Stop cigarette smoking: 

9. Go easy on alcohol. Drinking large 
amounts of alcohol increases the risk of 
liver cancer. And, heavy drinkers who 
smoke are at much greater risk for can- 
cers of the mouth, throat, larynx and 



Lakeland Newspapenv 90 

Risk 



esophagus than nonsmokers. 
10. Avoid overexposure to the sun. Reduce 
the risk of getting skin cancer by wearing 
protective clothing or by using a sun- 
screen. 

The program will be offered . by the 
Society's 3,242 local Units with special 
emphasis on workplace seminars, houses 
of worship and supermarkets. About 
250,000 public education volunteers, have 
been mobilized, all over the country, for 
this massive effort. 

In addition to the printed material, 
videotape and slide presentations have 
been developed. A film using science 
fiction themes and special effects also has 
been produced. 

"The ^material we've put together for 
this program has one purpose— to 
motivate* people to adopt these practices," 
said John R. Seffrin, Ph.D., chairman of 
the Society's National Public Education 
Committee. 

"We've been very successful in in- 
creasing the cure rate for patients who 
already have cancer," Dr. LeMaistre said. 
"Now we have the knowledge that will 
enable usjto attack cancer before it starts. 
This is some of the best news about cancer 
we can offer the public. There's no magic 
potion to jward off cancer, but we are far 
from helpless." 



Fitness Experts 
Favor Aerobics 



Many fitness experts sing the praises of 
aerobic exercise and its cardiovascular 
benefits, while those interested in shaping 
and toning swear by working with weights 
(resistive exercise). Now a new home 
gym, by the fitness pioneer who 
revolutionized the exercise world some 30 
years ago, allows the user to combine both 
aerobic and resistive exercise to work 
every muscle group in the body. ■ 

It's called Ultra- Shaper. Almost in- 
visible on a wall or in a doorway, it takes 
up only 10 square inches of space and per- 
forms every exercise done on every con- 
ceivable piece of exercise equipment 
costing many times more. 

"We call this essential combination of 
resistive and aerobic exercise 
Musclaerobics," said Ultra-Shaper in- 
ventor Harold Zinkin. "It could be the 
most important term and the most im- 
portant concept in the fitness world to 
date, and while they're built into the Ultra- 
Shaper, the principles of Musclaerobics 
are applicable to workouts in general." 

In 1957, this award-winning body-builder 
and the state's first Mr. California (1941) 
made fitness, history with his Universal 
Gym, the first of its kind in what was then 
an uncertain industry. Today, Universal 
equipment is in schools and fitness centers 
all over the world. It's been installed at the 



White House, even bolted to the decks of 
aircraft carriers. 

Ultra-Shaper is Zinkin's sixth patent. 
Unlike o^her gyms, it provides the user 
with instant variable resistance. There's 
no stacking of weights or moving of pins to 
interrupt the workout. You just step away 
from the machine or adjust a simple 
manual control. An easy-to-read gauge 
shows what percentage of Ultra-Shaper's 
capacity you are using. 

"Every part of the Ultra-Shaper is made 
of the finest materials, many from the 
aerospace industry," Zinkin said. "In 
tests, the polymer resistance systems per- 
formed f|awlessly, with no failures in over 
a million mechanical repetitions." 

the Ultra-Shaper is available in two 
models and comes with a 14-inch revolving 
multi-bar, a shoulder attachment for 
jogging and aerobics, and ankle strap for 
leg and hip exercies, and a 28-page manual 
to guide man, woman, child— even the ad- 
vanced athlete— to exercise perfection. It 
carries a warranty, comes fully assembled 
and ready to install, and retails for $189. 

For additional product information, plus 
a free guide on how to apply the principles 
of Musclaerobics to your current exercise 
program, send a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to Zinkin Fitness International, 
2377 W. Shaw, Suite 112A, Fresno, CA 
93711. ■! 



Care Center Gives Variety 



vices. 



Imagine family health care and 
emergency room services at one facility 
closebytohome. 

It has become reality in Lake County 
thanks to The Primary Care Family & 
Emergency Care Center, located in the 
Lakewood Medical Building in Liber- 
tuviile. 

The care center stresses its availaibility 
to the individual's time schedule. Open 
when patients need carem hours are to 8 
p.m. on weekdays and from 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. 

Primary Care, besides its Libertyville' 
office, also has offices at Rte. 41 & Delany 



in Gurnee and 915 Toft in Antioch. 

Family health needs covered at Primary 
Care include: family practice; internal 
medicine; industrial medicine; urgent 
care; allergies; pediateics; othopcdics 
and minor surgery. 

Specialists are available through the 
practice when necessary. 

The emergency phone number is staffed 
24 hours a day, seven days a week and a 
doctor is always on call. 

Primary Care Center also offers com- 
pleting claim form, offering tran- 
sportation services to the elderly and 
overall compassion. 




Thursday May 15, 4 986 



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II. Hospitals Offer 
Services To Seniors 



Thanks to modern health care, people 
are living longer, healthier lives. As the 
percentage of older adults in the 
population increases, Illinois hospitals are 
serving senior citizens through a variety of 
specialized services. 

Several Illinois hospitals have opened 
adult day care centers that help postpone 
or prevent institutionalization for elderly 
with special psychological needs. Two cen- 
ters, operated by St. Mary's Hospital in 
Streator and Holy Cross Hospital in 
Chicago, combine professional super- 
vision, with social, cultural, and 



rehabilitative activities,- Clients par- 
ticipate in a variety of structured ac- 
tivities such as field trips and current- 
event discussions, but are also encouraged 
to maintain their independence. . 

Another Illinois hospital system, in con- 
junction with National Senior Citizens 
Month in May, is offering a program for 
children of aging parents. "As Parents 
Grow Older," sponsored by the Delnor 
Community Health System in Geneva, 
teaches participants to cope with the legal, 
financial, medical, and emotional 
problems people encounter when caring 
for an aging parent. 



Hawthorn Place Offers 
Quick, Professional Care 



Equipment to cope with medical 
emergencies coupled with faster out- 
patient themes are just two of the facets of 
Hawthorn Place Surgical Center in Liber- 
tyville. 

Located on Holluster Drive, Hawthorn 
Place gives patient same-day outpatient 
surgery where "patients are people too," 
according to a Hawthorn brochure, 

The center is designed to provide 
maximum outpatient safety and comfort 
while reducing medical costs. 

The average length of stay at the facility 
is from three to four hours from time of ad- 



mitting to discharge. Automatic transfers 
to area hospitals are available. 

Surgical procedures performed at the 
center include: Denta^fc Oral; Ear, Nose 
and Throat; Podiatry; Plastic; Vascular; 
Gastrointestinal; Eye; , Orthopedic; 
Pediatric; Urology and Gynecology. 

The center features a nursing staff 
which provices patient with assistance 
during arrival, departure and answers 
questions. 

The staff monitors medical and surgical 
care through a quality assurance process. 



Sun Can Lead To Cancer 



Although many people look forward to 
summertime and the warm feeling of 
sunshine on their skin, the healthy glow of 
a suntan can lead later to a host of 
problems: dryness, wrinkles, liver spots, 
and skin cancer. 

More than 400,000 cases of skin cancer 
are diagnosed each year. About 7400 
deaths result annually. 

Victory Hospital's oncology (cancer) 
unit is sponsoring its second free skin 
cancer screening on Wednesday, May 28 
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the hospital 
located at 1324 North Sheridan Road in 
Waukegan. Appoinments can be made'by 
calling 360-4246. Depending on physicians' 
availability, a few walk-ins may be ac- 
commodated. 

During last year's skin cancer 
screening, Victory's physicians idenitified 
a number of individuals who had 
suspicious lesions. These people were 
referred to their own doctors for follow-up. 
People with very fair complexions and 
light eyes (blue, green or gray) are most 
prone to overexposure to the sun and skin 



cancer. But anyone who spends a great 
deal of time in the sun is at risk. 

There are several types of skin cancer. 
Some are easily treated. Some have poorer 
prognoses. 

The best precaution is to avoid 
overexposure. Staying out of the sun when 
it is at its most intense- between 10 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. is advisable. And sun wor- 
shippers should use a sunscreen lotion or 
cream or a sun block. Sunscreen 
preparations should be used when persons 
are out-of-doors for an extended period, 
whether jogging, boating, gardening, or 
swimming. 

But no sunscreen gives total protection. 
And even the darkest black skin is not 
immune to skin cancer or the sun's aging 
effects. And ultraviolet rays have a 
cumulative effect. So the bronze glow 
prized so highly by those in their younger 
years can result in sagging, wrinkled skin 
later, and can increase the chances of 
developing skin cancer. 

As the American Cancer Society warns, 
if you fry now, you'll pay later. 



<r 



^ 




MM6 



THE FAMILY DOCTORS 

716 South Milwauktt Aw. • 6 Ea«t Phillip Road 
Uhtrtyvlllt, IL 60041 ■ Varnon Hills, IL 60061 
(312) 362-1393 (312) 367-1393 



Wallace L Salzman, M.O. 
Richard H. Dolan, M.D. 
Mark H. Flalda, Jr., M.O. 
William R. Qraanllald. M.D. 
Charles S. Colodny, M.D. 

Dlplomaiai of ihe American 
Board of Family Practice 



• Pleasant Relaxed Atmosphere • 24-Hour Emergency Care 

• Evening and Weekend Hours • Convenient Appointments 



OFFICE HOURS 

Mon.-Fri. — 9 a.m. -6 p.m. 
Sat. — 9 a.m,-1 p.m. 
Same day appointments 

available 



APPOINTMENTS (312) 362-1393 • (312) 367-1393 



Appointments are requested In order to pro- 
vide you with the amount of time needed to 
care lor your medical problem. 



^ 



New Patients Welcome 



J 



Handicaped people 
need to keep fit, too 

Health and fitness programs are very popular these days. 

A fitness program, in many instances can be pursued for 
many handicapped individuals. 

Perhaps the term "physically challenged" is more ap- 
propriate. For many people, the wheelchair, orthopedic 
brace, or artificial limb is more than an ambulatory aid. 
Many physically challenged individuals use these special 
devices to aid in recreation and exercise. 

Wheelchair sports such as nationally organized basketball 
leagues are very popular. 

Individuals who wear a leg prosthesis (artificial limb) in 
good health may engage in various sports such as water and 
snow skiing, jogging, golf and tennis. The type and level of 
activity will be determined by the health and length of re- 
maining limb. 

Special terminal devices for the person that wears an ar- 
tificial arm will allow the wearers to use the prosthesis for 
such sports as baseball, archery, bowling, golf and more. . 

Please call us for more information, we are here to HELP. 

"McKINNEY PROSTHETICS-ORTHOTICS, INC. 

Donald R. McKinney, C.P.O. 
Orchard Lane Medical Building 

2634 Grand Avenue, Suite 1 02 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085 

(312)623-6080 



Hawthorn Place 
Surgical Center 

Same-day outpatient surgery where 
patients are people tool 

Surgical procedures performed at our Center: 



• Dental & Oral 
•Ear, Nose &. Throat 

• Podiatry 
•Vascular 
•Gastrointestinal 



• Eye 

•Orthopedic 

• Pediatric 

• Urology 
Gynecology 



•General Surgical Procedures 

■Fully licensed by the Department of 
Public Health of the State of Illinois 

■Accredited by Accreditation Associa- 
tion for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. 

■Medicare approved. 




Surgical Center 

1900 Hollister Drive 

Suite 1 00 
Libertyville, IL 60048 

(312)367-8100 



.. Tc ,ora Highway-Commissioner 

May 15; 1986 w r' 



586C494-RL 



26B Lakeland Newspapers 



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Thursday May 1 5, 1986 

THE 



Lakeland Newspapers 11 D 




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Home of the Greenberg Radiology Institute . :. The most complete private 

practice diagnostic medical facility in the country! 

Two Medicare approved Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems 

Computerized Tomography* Digital Angiography* Standard Radiography* 

Mammography • Nuclear Medicine • Ultrasound 

All situated in a most un-institutional atmosphere . . . where every patient is 

treated like family . . . by the family that has provided the midwest with the 

finest care for three decades. 

Exercise your freedom of choice . . . the next time diagnostic tests are 

prescribed, call us for an appointment ... the choice is yoursl 



m 






Brant 




*r. 



Irving M. Gmnbtrg, M.D. 



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. GrMnb«g,£'M.DL Mark Grmmnh* 9 ?M.O. 

GREENBERG RADIOLOGY INSTITUTE 

1535 Park Avenue West, Highland Park, Illinois 60035 
(312)831-0500 



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Thursday May 15, 19S6 




To Escape Allerg 




Travel and vacation time. Everybody 
welcomes it, but some travelers greet it 
with special glee. 

They're the sniffling, snuffling, stuffy- 
nosed sufferers from hay fever and other 
afflictions brought on by allergies to air- 
borne pollen, mold and similar nuisances. 

For them, vacation time is really getting 
away— away from ragweed, a plant which 
produces the smallest, most annoying, 
most penetrating pollen in the United 



States. 

But the problem isn't limited to 
ragweed. Since grass and trees, as well as 
plants, produce pollen, it's almost im- 
possible to run away from all such 
allergens— especially on camping-trip 
vacations. 

What's more, allergy-activating mold 
spores are in the air almost everywhere. 
Still, there's hope for the hay fevered 
traveler. These suggestions can help: 




Victory's Volunteers 

Esther and Tony Vider represent Victory's 400 volunteers who donate many 
hours of service for our patients. 

Helping Others A Way 
Of Life For Volunteers 



Esther and Tony Vider are two volunteers 
who, like so many people at Victory 
Hospital, make helping others a way of 
life. They come to Victory because they 
truly care about the patients and families 
who turn to this hospital for their health 
needs. 

Esther spends her lime at Victory 
delivering flowers to patients and mending 
and making items in the sewing unit. Tony 
is involved with the Emergency depart- 
ment, and transports patients, runs 
errands for the staff and directs people 
who come through the area. Tony has been 
with the department for six years, and is 
"always impressed with the kind and 
pleasant staff" he has been helping for so 
long. 

Tony and Esther are among the 400 
volunteers who gave more than 48 
thousand hours of time to Victory in 1985. 
They are also members of the Auxiliary, 
which raised fifty-five thousand dollars 
last year to benefit our patients. The 
Auxiliary puts service to the hospital first, 
but enthusiastically supports bake sales, 



the Gift Shop, holiday bazaars and other 
money-generating events. 

Volunteering "works" at Victory 
because there arc so many different kinds 
of jobs available for volunteers. It works 
because volunteering gets to the heart of 
our basic human needs: to feel wanted and 
useful, and to know that life has a purpose 
and meaning. 

the desire to volunteer is rooted deeply 
in our American heritage. People in this 
country still feel the obligation to help each 
other. Yesterday's volunteers gathered to 
raise a barn or to harvest a neighbor's 
crops. Today's volunteers at Victory see 
that patients get their newspapers, flowers 
or mail. They talk to them, feed them, 
laugh and cry with them and accompany 
them wherever they have to go throughout 
the hospital, 

They're volunteers. They're helping to 
make Victory one of the finest hospitals 
around. All of us are deeply grateful for 
the jobs they do. 

If you would like to become a Victory 
Hospital Volunteer call 360-4127. 



1. Consult your doctor'. For those who 
suffer severely from has fever or similar 
allergy-induced reactions, antihistamines 
or injections can be, the most effective 
means of control. 

2. Select your vacation locale with 
special regard for weather. The climate 
should be a temperate one, neither too hot 
nor too cold. Don't travel in hot, windy 
weather, when there will be much pollen in 
the air. 



3. Avoid becoming overheated— or 
chilled. The right course is to keep cool, 
but not too cool. Excessive air con- 
ditioning, in the car or motel, may irritate 
your allergy, rather than soothe it. 

4. Travel at a relaxed pace, and don't 
overdo. Fatigue can bring oft a hay fever 
attack. Plan to travel no more than a com- 
fortable distance each day, and don't try to 
do and see too much. You'll enjoy your 
vacation more, too. 



Expectant Mothers 
Hove Special Needs 



. "Have another helping, dear. Remem- 
ber, you're eating for two nowl" Almost 
every new mom-to-be has likely heard that 
line at least once since she became 
pregnant. But twice as much to eat is not 
necessarily twice as healthy.- 

An expectant mother does have special 
nutritional needs. Research demonstrates 
that eating a high quality diet while 
pregnant has many benefits for both 
mother and baby. 

Good Shepherd Hospital now offers a 
class in Prenatal Nutrition. Led by a 
registered dietitian, this class will help 
participants plan a high nnality, and in- 



teresting, diet for pregnancy and beyond. 

The class will be held on Thursday, May 
15, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the hospital. The 
class will cover special nutrient needs, ad- 
vantages of a high quality diet, recom- 
mendations for weight control, and coping 
with discomforts such as nausea and hear- 
tburn. 

You will learn how to evaluate your own 
diet and plan a diet to meet your individual 
needs. The fee for the program is $10. If 
you would tike further information, or to 
register, please call Good Shepherd 
Hospital at (312) 381-9353. 



To Discuss Heart Disease 



Cardiologists from the Medical Staff of 
Good Shepherd Hospital will discuss 
"Heart Disease: Could It Be Me?", at a 
program to be held at the hospital on 
Saturday, May 31. 

The physicians will address the function 
of the heart, .what can go wrong, and how 
various problems can be treated. They will 
also talk about what can be done to prevent 
heart disease, 

A cardiac risk screening will also be of- 
fered for $15 for persons who are in- 
terested in this laboratory test. The blood 
test is designed to aid in identifying your 
risk for cardiovascular disease by deter- 
mining levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, 
high density and low density lipoproteins. 

The screening will begin at 7:30 a.m. A 
buffet breakfast will be served at 8 a.m. 
The speakers will begin at 9 a.m. Fee for 
the program and breakfast (not including 



the cardiac risk screen) is $5. Reser- 
vations are required: There are some 
specific instructions for having the blood 
'test. Please call Good Shepherd Hospital 
at 381-9353 for further information and 
reservations. 

Nurses Get 
Corsages 

As part of Nurses Day, May 6, every nur- 
pe at Saint Therese Medical Center in 
kvaukegan was presented with a corsage, 
compliments of the center's ad- 
ministration. Linda Geisler; director of 
nursing, presented the flowers along with 
a card thanking the nurses for their hard 
work and dedication to their patients and 
to the medical center. 

All employees of the center received a 
free dessert in the cafeteria to celebrate 
with the nurses. 



Hospital To Deliver 
Fruit To Patients 



Patients entering Saint Therese Medical 
Center, Waukegan, will find a special sur- 
prise in store for them beginning in May. 

According to Al Moyer, director of the 
center's food and nutritional services, "A 
small wicker basket filled with assorted 
fresh fruits will be delivered to patients the 
day they are admitted to Saint Therese 
Medical Center. A greeting card from the 
Saint Therese Family wishing them well 



will oe tucked in each basket. 
According to Moyer, Saint Therese is the 

first and only area hospital to initiate this 

-*iervice to welcome patients. 
"One of the essentials to good health and 
speedy recovery is nutritional food, and 

resh fruit represents one of the basic food 
[roups," he pointed out. "In those cases 

where the patient may be on a special diet 

which prohibits fresh fruits, the basket can 

be given to the patient's family." 



(pearlFy 

yvision center J 
Dr. Milton Rose 

OPTOMETRIST 

VERNON HILLS 

246 Hawthorn Village Commons 

Illinois 60061 

Tel. (312) 680-9160 



( 



COMMUNITY DENTAL CENTER 

Family Dentistry 

Dr. Michael J. Fitzgerald Dr. Thomas J. Grelst 



D.O.S. 



D.D.S. 



(312) 949-9400 



Complete Dental Care 

Bridges, Crowns 
Denture (Including same day reline & repair) 

Hours by Appointment 837 s °"' h lako 5 "° ot 

Including Sat. & Evenings Mundeio.n. n 60060 

(312) 949-9400 



TELEPHONE; 330-8422 


■ 


2>r. 


3.£:fo*t»rJ,i 




DENTIST 




LINDEN PLAZA 

- 2038 E. GRAND AVE., "ROUTE 132 

LINDENHURST. ILL. 0OO48 



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..', , 'mV«»:. » .Thursday May 15, 1986 



20fl Lakeland Newspapers 



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lakeland Newpapers 1 30 




The cost of caring for the medically in- 
digent in Illinois hospitals is nearing $400 
million a year, according to the Illinois 
Hospital Assn.'s Task Force on Indigent 
[Care in a report scheduled for release this 
month. 

Not only is the charity care and bad debt 
burden greater today than in the past, but 
Illinois hospitals .are finding it more dif- 
: ficult than ever before to manage this bur- 
den. The intensely competitive en- 
vironment with its new provider-payer 
relationships and emphasis on cost con- 
tainment has reduced hospitals' ability to 
absorb indigent care losses. 

The taks force was organized in May 



1965 to identify the indigent care problem 
in Illinois, pinpoint fair and mechanically 
sound solutions to uncompensated care, 
and recommend possible sources of fun- 
ding. 

In researching health care funding for 
the poor, the task force discovered a com- 
plex problem with no clear solutions. In or- 
der to profile specific types of patients 
most likely to be medically indigent, the 
task force surveyed hospital patient ac- 
counts that were determined to be charity 
care or uncollectible. The survey results 
showed no typical indigent patient but 
rather a range of people, including the 
chronically poor, the under-insured, and 
the temporarily unemployed. 




ft 



FREE 
FOOT & ANKLE 
¥ EXAMINATIONS 






Hospital Day Draws 
State Legislators 



More than 1,000 hospital representatives 
from approximately 100 Illinois hospitals last 
month gathered in Springfield for Hospital 
Day 1966, the Illinois Hospital Assn.'s annual 
hospital lobbying day. Those hospital ad- 
ministrators, trustees, staff.and volunteers 
participated in Hospital Day in order to ex- 
press health care concerns to their 
legislators, including the need to reform 
Illinois' tort system. 

Hospital Day drew government officials 
and legislators from around the state and 
across party lines. Addressing the crowd 
were Gov. Thompson's Chief of Staff James 
R; Reilly, State Treasurer James H. Don- 
newald, Senate Majority Leader Philip J. 
Rock (D-Oak Park), House Minority Leader 
Lee A. Daniels (R-Elmhurst), Sen. Aldo A. 
DeAngelis (R-Chicago Heights), and £en. 



Vince Demuzio (D-Carlinville). 

Speaking for the governor, Reilly told 
hospital representatives that the liability 
insurance crisis must be solved. The 
inability to attain affordable liability in- 
surance affects Hospitals, cities, and 
businesses, he said, but it is still going to 
take a "massive lobbying effort" to 
achieve meaningful tort reform. 

Hospital volunteers from throughout the 
state attended Hospital Day and heard the 
governor's chief of staff read -a special 
proclamation designating April 22, 1986, 
Volunteer Recognition/Hospital Day. After 
Reilly delivered the proclamation, 2,000 
helium-filled balloons were released at the 
Capitol. Each balloon represented 100 of the 
200,000 hospital volunteers in Illinois. 



Infants-Children-Adults 
Will Be Offered In 

WAUKEGAN/GURNEE OFFICE 

3834 KEITH AVENUE 
(Corner Of Northwestern) 

(312) 244.5557 

■and- ■ 

GRAYSLAKE OFFICE 

102/106 CENTER STREET 

(Downtown Grayslake) 

(312) 223-6066 



PLEASE REQUEST A 
FREE FOOT EXAMINATION 



Compliments Of 

DR. JACK CHULENGARIAN P.C. 



Past Chrm. Dept. Podiatric Surgery, Amer. Intt. Hosp. Surgical Staff No. 

Ctr. and Hawthorn Surgical Or. 

DR. IRVING PIKSCHER 

Diplomate, American Board Podiatric Surgery Board Certified 



I.Med. 




m Ik At The 

Ultehiust Health 

Fait, Mq 16, 17 & 18 



1911 27th Street 

Zion 

Call 872-1615 



The Multi-Specialty Medical Facility 

of Lake County with qualified physicians 

in the following areas: 

♦ Family Practice 
♦ Pediatrics 
♦ Gynecology 
♦ Internal Medicine 
♦ Surgery 
♦ Dentistry 
♦ Cardio Pulmonary Disorders 
♦ Vascular Diseases 
}, ,„. * Nutrition Counseling/Weight Control 

• ♦ Psychological Services 

• Podiatry 

Come tour the finest outpatient medical 
facility in Lake County. Daily toufs from 
9:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. - 

Convenient Hours 

Monday-Friday 8:30a,m. - 5:00p.m. 
Wednesday 8:30a.m. - 7:00p.m. 



V'/j'j'V j J. ',*•'. •.'••.•.• * '•• • • • • * • * • * * * • • 



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Thursday May 15, 1986 



Lakeland Newtpapers 15A 



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New Scanner In Use At Chicago Medical ! 



Thursday May 15, 1966 

it 




One of the latest advances in radiologic 
technology is now being used with con- 
siderable success by the Robert R. Mc- 
Cormick Clinics at the University of 
Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical 
School. 

According to Walid A. Hindo, M.D. 
chairman of the Dept. of Radiology, the 
device, known as the Magnetic Resonance 
Imager, is a revolutionary step forward in 
that it exposes the internal tissue structure 
of . the body as no equipment has 
before.. .and does it without any radiation 
or use of x-rays. 

It is painless, completely safe, has no ap- 
parent side effects (headaches, nausea) 
and can be completed within 30 minutes to 
an hour on an outpatient basis. 

"In some cases this machine is per- 
ferable to CT scanning as a state-of-the-art 
method of giving us more important, 
useable information than ever before, par- 
ticularly with respect to the brain and the 
back," Hindo says. 

In fact, he says, some radiologists feel 
that the development of the MRI ranks in 
significance with the invention of the x-ray 
machine a century ago. 

The manner in which the machine 
operates isn't that hard to understand. 
Using a giant magnet, the imaging device 
generates a high strength series of 
magnetic fields that cause the body's 
atoms to vibrate and, in essence, become 
miniature radio transmitters. 

A computer collects these signals and 
transforms them into clear cross-sectional 
images of the body's internal tissues and 
organs, allowing doctors to spot tumors 
without the use of hazardous radiation. 

"It is a highly advanced imaging 
technique." says Hindo, "because it can 
see with clarity through the thickest of 



bone structure without using dyes or other 
substances which, if introduced into the 
body, can cause unpleasant side effects." 

Moreover, and unlike the CT scanner, 
which can obtain only cross-sectional 
images, the MRI produces-highly detailed 
pictures of body tissues in multiple planes. 

Among the numerous potential usages of 
MRI are: to differentiate between ab- 
normal and normal breast tissue, and 
malignant and non-malignant lung tissue; 
diagnosis of neurological disorders (in- 
cluding strokes, tumors, multiple sclerosis 
and brain edema); detection of spinal cord 
problems; identification of slipped discs 
and aneurysms; and remarkable 
reproduction and visualization of specific 
chambers of the heart. 

Through its ability to develop images in 
any sectional plane and state of 
enlargement, MRI is also often used to 
evaluate the extent of orthopedic injuries 
and, possibly, even the effect of drugs, 
such as lithium or manic-depressive 
illness. 

Hindo indicates that the MRI services of- 
fered by the Robert R. McCormick Clincis 
include both the scanning and professional 
interpretation. Physicians referring 
patients will not lose contact with their 
patient and are, in fact, encouraged to 
follow through all aspects of MRI 
evaluation. 

Sharon Weinstein.'clinics adminsitrator, 
has invited physicians to come over for a 
first-hand demonstration. In fact, she 
says, the clinics, located at 3333 Green Bay 
Rd. (just south of the Buckley Rd. (Rte. 
137) inter-section), is offering an in- 
troductory imaging charge of only $500 per 
single view scan. 



"So far," she says ''everyone who has 
used the equipment is highly impressed 
with its accuracy, safety and versatility. It 



really is a big step forward in medical 
technology and our prices are among the 
lowest in the area." - 




Technician Monitors Results 

A technician at the Robert R. McCormick Clinics monitors the results of o scan on 
the Magnetic Resonance Imager, which is being used by the University of Health 
Sciences / The Chicago Medical School, with great success. 




Victory Memorial Hospital honored Bill Gilbert, Special Project Coordinator - Victory Health Outreach Center in Lake Villa, 
Helen Stringer, R.N. - Assistant Vice President, Critical Care Nursing, and Carol Wolff - Assistant Director, Dietary at an 
employee recognition dinner. These dedicated employees have each provided 30 years of service toVictoryHospital. Also 
pictured is Donald Wasson, President. 
Thanks. 



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Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 



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Gamefield Program Helps Maintain Health 

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Lakeland Newspapers 15D 



Once upon a time, hospitals were places 
where you went to get well when you were 
sick or injured. The facilities were simple: 
there were patient rooms, operating 
rooms, doctors' offices, and testing rooms. 

Today, hospitals have become just one 
among many facilities and services of- 
fered by sprawling medical centers. 

Rather than simply working to restore, 
health, hospitals today are putting as 
much emphasis on maintaining good 
health and preventing injury and illness. 

St. Therese Medical Center of Waukegan 
has joined with the National Fitness Cam- 
paign to sponsor the opening of nine 



"Gamefield Fitness Courses" throughout 
northern Lake County as part of its com- 
mitment to encourage people to get proper 
exercise and conditioning. 

The program was built around an 
award-winning outdoor fitness facility and 
curriculum designed by the Stanford 
University Heart Disease Prevention Cen- 
ter and the Arizona Heart Institute. It is 
funded by corporations who, through the 
National Fitness Campaign, make grants 
available to partners in public schools, 
parks, and community organizations. 

Each Gamefield features up to 20 exer- 
cise stations that offer different levels of 



May 16-18 Health Fair 
At Lakehurst Mall 



participation for beginning, intermediate, 
and advanced use of each system. 

Throughout the nation, more than 5,000 
of the Gamefield systems are being put in- 
touse. 

In northern Lake County, the fitness 
courses are being installed at the College 
of Lake County, Beaulah Park School in 
Zion, Antioch Community High School, the 
Village of Round Lake Park, Antioch 
Parks and Recreation Dept, Lake Villa 
School Dist. 41, Grayslake High School, 
North Chicago High School, and the Man- 
chester Knolls Cooperative in North 
Chicago. 

St. Therese Medical Center President 
Nora O'Malley said, "This must tell people 
that health care leaders are concerned 
with wellness and good physical con- 
ditioning. We at St. Therese are proud to 
be a part of the Gamef ields Fitness Course 



Program and compliment our partners in 
providing these nine facilities for the im- 
proved good health of everyone who 
wishes to take advantage of them." 

As medical costs continue to rise, the 
maintenace of good health becomes more 
important to everyone. Certainly, the new 
emphasis that hospitals are putting on 
health maintenance can only serve to work 
to the benefit of everyone. 

Moms Of Twins Meet 

The Lake County Mothers of Twins Club in- 
vites all mothers of multiple births to its 
meeting Thursday, May 15, 7:30 p.m. at the 
Warren-Newport Public Library, 224 N. 
O'PIaine Rd., in Gurnee. There will be a 
discussion on "Going Back to Work After 
Twins." For more information, call (312) 
223-7020. 



Health care is fastly becoming one of the 
most important consumer products on the 
market. Over 15 area hospitals and health 
care groups will show their ongoing at- 
tention to the public's demand as they 
gather for the May 16-18 health fair at 
Lakehurst Mall. 

The exhibitors will provide free in- 
formation and tests on health related 
issues like cardiac fitness, nutrition, eye 
care, body fat proportions, stress and 
proper exercise techniques. 

Displays like Med Star," an emergency 
medical helicopter, will also introduce the 
public to the latest in medical technology. 
The emergency aircraft will land and be 
open for exhibit Saturday and Sunday on 
Lakehurst's southwest parking lot. In ad- 
dition, an ambulance and home health 
care van will be displaced at center court 
throughout the weekend. 



The American Red Cross has scheduled 
a blood drive for 12:30-5:30 p.m. on Sunday 
in the Lakehurst Community Room. In- 
terested donors can preregister for the 
blood drive at the information center. 

Other weekend activities include aerobic 
dance and exercise presentations at 1 and 
3 p.m. on Friday-Sunday, at center court. 

Health fair participants include: Victory 
Memorial Hospital, Maves Chiropractic 
Clinic, Veteran's Administration Medical 
Center, Lake County Health Dept., Great 
Lakes Naval Hospital, St. Therese Medical 
Center, Club Nautilus, Eye Care Center, 
Lions Club, Vitamin World, Abbott 
Laboratories, American International 
Hospital, Bridge House, American Vision 
Center, American Red Cross, Rollene 
Pools and Spas, and Reiki Radiance Cen- 
ter. 



COMMUNITY DENTAL CENTER 

Family Dentistry 

Dr. Michael J. Fitzgerald Dr. Thomas J. Greist 



D.D.S. 



D.D.S. 



(312) 949-9400 



Complete Dental Care 

Bridges, Crowns • 
Denture (Including same day reline & repair) 

837 South Lake Street 
Mundelein, IL 60060 

(312) 949-9400 



Hours by Appointment 
Including Sat & Evenings 




GOOD HEALTH IS YOUR 
MOST PRIZED POSSESSION 

Do you take the same care in choosing your healthcare facility that you do in choosing your personal physician, your 
attorney, your car? If not, you should because it's YOUR HEALTH that's at stake. 

At the newly enlarged and remodeled Robert R. McCormick University Clinics on the campus of the University of 
Health Sciences/Chicago Medical School. ..you have these advantages right from the start: First, you KNOW you'll be 
seen by highly trained, experienced physicians. ..members of the Medical School's clinical faculty! Second, you will 
have access to numerous coordinated services and state of the art equipment - all available in one location - but not 
usually offered elsewhere. Third, the cost to you is often lower than that available at hospital emergency rooms. Fourth, 
we have a convenient, easy-to-reach location, flexible hours and ample FREE parking. 

One out of every ten physicians in the Chicagoland area is a graduate of the Chicago MedicaSSchool! And if you 
didn't know about our Robert R. McCormick University Clinics. ..you do NOW. Come join us. ..and chances are you'll 
never want to go anywhere else. With us, you expect the exceptional.. .and you'll get it. 

THE ROBERT R. McCORMICK UNIVERSITY CLINICS 

UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES/THE CHICAGO MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Overall Clinic Services 
Are Available As Follows: 

Monday 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

Wednesday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

Thursday 8:00 a.m. ■ 8:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:00 a.m. * 6:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 



3333 N. Green Bay Road 

[Just South Of Buckley Road, (rt. 137) Intersection] 

(312)578-3268 




EXCEPTIONAL FACILITIES ... EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE ... EXCEPTIONAL IDEAS ... EXCEPTIONAL PEOPLE. 




. 



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BAXTER TRAVENOL 

1 1 

Proud to be part 
of the growth in 
Lake County 




Baxter Travenol Laboratories, 
Inc., began operations in the 
north suburban area more than 
fifty years ago. With a long history 
of commitment to leadership in 
health care, the company took a 
major step toward that end in 1985 
by merging with American Hospital 
Supply Corporation, our neighbor 
in Evanston. In the process, we 
created the premier health care 
company with sales of more than 
$5 billion a year and with many 
strategic strengths. 

Baxter Travenol produces a wide 
range of life-saving health care 
products and related services, 



delivering the benefits of modern 
technology at the least possible 
cost. Innovative, quality products 
are used in a variety of settings, 
including hospitals, clinical 
laboratories, dialysis centers, 
jDlood banks and the home by 
physicians, surgeons, nurses, 
technicians, and increasi 
patients themselves. 

Today, Baxter Travenol, head- 
quartered in Deerfield, serves 
millions of patients in more than 
100 countries. We employ over 
1 1 ,000 people from the north 
suburbs and are proud to call this 
community home. 




s/jt&dud/tifz Inffia/^Cau^ 



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Baxter Travenol Laboratories, inc., Deerfield • Elk Grove Village • Evanston • Gurnee • Highland Park • 
McGaw Park • Morton Grove • Mundelein • Niles • Northbrook • Round Lake • Schaumburg 



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586C-494-RL 



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586C-495 



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RD KNOWS WHAT AMERICA WANTS...VALUE 




INCREASE IN ~ ' "~ ~^**^ - 

INCREASeTn CAR PRICES ~ ■UNLIMITED MILEAGE POWERTRAIH WARRANTY 

"SSSS PERCeVTtaSI RATE > FINANCING ■■FACTORY SAVINGS 

■DEALER DISCOUNTS 






[7 ! SeaSprite Bowrider Boat 

Sea Bird trailer, cover. 

6995 




-'=340-* 



[Bronco II "Eddie Bauer" 

i fadoiywirranty. AM/rV cassette, full power. 



■AM/FM Stereo 
■Premium Sound 
■Polycast Wheels 
■Power Locks 
■Power Brakes 



s5 Ford Clubwagon 
XLT 

jV-8, auto, trans., P/S, P/B, A/C, 
(cassette, clean. 

3, OOP 



Equipment 1 986 Ford LTD Brougham 



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5£5£cU*. Jhfg to Our Prtcm; 

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1982 Ford EXP 

' P/S, P/BrAyCrAM/FM, nice car. 



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iwiUdura i StQestHl Betel Price 

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1 983 Lincoln Town Car 

Leather, tu-tone paint, 302 and luxury plus. 




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$ 11,499 

Include* Frmlght 

'[—Orr— 
NO MONEY DOWN 

|43 * 



Car Off The Year 



*216 





Pmr Month J 

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1981 Ford F250 4x4 

)l! bar with lights, V-8, auto., P/S, P/B, A/C, heavy duty 

$ 4995 






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1978 Lincoln Mark V 





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1981 Ford F1 00 Pick Up 

O.D. trans.. P/S, P/B, AM/FM cassette and cap. 

^4725 





1979 Ford T-Bird 

Nice car, AM/FM. 



With Pat Ryan's 
10.9% Used Car Financing 




fiTiij }£\&&ei££. vt i s* .-r.^ «7 



1980 Ford Fairmont Wgn 



Good transportation. 



. 



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PAT RYAN 



ANTIOCH Rte. 1T3, Juit East off Rto. 83 

- Leasing Available * Dally Rentals Available 

«.*orF ciippiv OF ADVERTISED UNITS IN STOCK. PAYMENTS. BASED I ON 
™OTW»»SSim LEASE WITH PURCHASE OPTION SALES 
w PI ATES 1ST PAYMENT AND SIMILAR SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED, 



IQBa. 

0§^| MERCURY 
LINCOLN 



(312) 
395-3*00 







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Lakeland Newspapers 1 5A 





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File Plans For NewMarkets '^1111111111^1®! 



MidCon Corp., a sub- 
sidiary of Occidental 
Petroleum Corp has filed 
plans to market and tran- 
sport natural gas through 
Lake County to new markets 
in Wisconsin. 

Three MidCon units, in- 
cluding a new interstate 
pipeline, would be involved 
in a 10-year agreement with 
Wisconsin Natural Gas 
Company, Racine, for, the 
sale on an inter ruptibie basis 
of up to 90,000 million British 
thermal units (MMBtus)- 
approximately 90. million 
cubic feet~of natural gas 
daily. 

Under the agreement, two 



MidCon interstate pipelines 
would transport gas from 
various U.S. producing 
areas to a delivery point in 
Wisconsin. In addition, 
MidCon Marketing will 
assist Wisconsin Natural in 
locating and purchasing the 
gas to be transported. 

Natural Gas Pipeline 
Company of -America, 
MidCon's largest pipeline 
unit, would move the gas to 
Lake County, where it would 
interconnect with a proposed 
new MidCon line, Moraine 
Pipeline Company,., near 
Waukegan. Moraine would 
then transport the gas to an 
interconnection with 



MidCon Corp.'s 
Proposed Moraine Pipeline 



BOONC 



flacinr 



Pipeline 




LA SAUE 



vm.'.v g.u Pipri<><* Co'-nDju, oi Amenta linn 
Piapoita VoM "( Pipeline Company ime 



Wisconsin Natural in 
Kenosha County. , 

In a filing made with the 
Federal Energy Regulatory 
Commission (FERC), 
Moraine- Pipeline and 
related facilities are 
estimated to cost ap- 
proximately $6.5 million; 
construction could be 
completed within six months 
after work begins. 

Wisconsin Natural will 
build approximately 11 miles 
of distribution facilities to 
carry the gas from the 
delivery point to its existing 
gas distribution system. 

Moraine filed its proposal 
under new FERC 
regulations providing for 
expedited approval 
procedures that would 
require the line to be an open 
access transporter of 
natural gas. 

In a separate filing made 
with the FERC, Natural Gas 
Pipeline asked for approval 
to transport gas from 
producing areas to Moraine 
Pipeline under traditional 
Natural Gas Act Section 7 
(c) authority. 

MidCon Corp. operates 
about 28,000 mites of wholly 
and jointly owned pipelines 
extending from Southwest, 
Gulf Coast and Rocky 
Mountain areas to the Upper 
Midwest; along the Gulf 
South from Texas to 
Florida; and within the state 
of Texas. 

Wisconsin Natural Gas, a 
subsidiary of the Wisconsin 
Electric Power Company, 
serves some 230,000 con- 
sumers in an eight-county 
area of southeast Wisconsin 
and the Appleton-Neenah- 
Menashaarea. 

Newsstands 

All associated weeklies in 
the Lakeland Newspaper 
group are available at your 
favorite newsstand Wed- 
nesday afternoon. 



The Lake County Sheriffs 
Police will be observing 
National Police Week and 
Peace Officer's Memorial 
Day, May 15, Lake County 
Sheriff Robert H. Babcox 
announced. 

"The annual observance is 
to bring community 
deserved recognition to 
those in law enforcement," 
Babcox said. 

"Traditionally, police 
shoulder the responsibility to 
serve and protect," Babcox 



said,' "the law enforcement 
shield stands for devotion to 
duty and the pursuit of 
justice." 

"One deputy, Gary 
Murphy was fatally shot in 
June 1976," Babcox said, "he 
along with other law en- 
forcement officers nation- 
wide have made the 
supreme sacrifice." 

"Our gratitude towards 
these dedicated people 
should be of continued 
support and to honor the 



memory of those who have 
died in the line of duty," 
Babcox concluded. 



Golfers Wonted 

Harbor Ridge Country 
Club in Antioch is looking for 
golfers for. its Thursday mor- 
ning ladies league. No han- 
dicap is required, League 
starts June 5 and plays 
through Sept. 4. Anyone 
wishing to join the league 
should call (312) 395-6200. 



Mason Takes Out Petitions 



Don Mason still intends to 
run against Lake County 
Sheriff Robert (Mickey) 
Babcox in the November 
election as a third party 
candidate. 

After he got his petition 
papers this week (he must 
get 8,863 signatures)he said 
that he still thinks it's unfair 
that he can't run against 
Babcox by himself as an 
independent. 

By election .law he must 
form a third party slate. 

Mason said that- he has 
found a lot of people willing 
to campaign for his slate 
especially in Dist. 4. 

"That should be a* hot 
race," he said. 

He added that he will not 
slate a candidate to run 
against Lake County Clerk 
Linda Hess. 

"She's highly qualified. 
She's been a lamb in a lion's 
den and I wouldn't want to 
take any votes away from 
her and help her opposition 
Donna Mae Litwiler and let 
Babcox add control of that 
county office to the others he 
has," Mason said. 

He also said that in talking 
to people, he is convinced 
that Sybil Yastrow is the 
best candidate for Lake 
County School Supt. 



He claims he does not need 
a full slate since a supreme 
court decision on that 
matter. 

He says that he will have a 
third party slate and all the 

signatures he needs. 
I just need 20 people to get 



500 signatures each over a 
90-day period," he added. 

Mason remarked that a 
win by Adlai Stevenson in his 
lawsuit concerning in- 
dependent candidate filing 
dates would really be in his 
(Mason's) favor. 



The Gramn Thumbs Of Wisconsin 
W«Icom«i You To 

Furmcm's Farm & Flowers 

Tomato Time 

15 Varieties to choose from. Home grown & conditioned. 

Pack Of 4/99 c 

Be4iin§ Phitts 

Everything from Ageratum to Zucchini. 

Rosebushes now in stock 



Specials of Hie week 

Rat if maritoUs - 72 Phirif $7.99 Reg. $9.99 
Pofeirtifa Shrub - 2 Ft. $7.99 Reg. $%99 




Furmcm's ..Farm And Flowers 

Hwy. 83, \ V, Mi. N. Of Antioch 
Trevor, Wl 

(414)862-2228 

Hours -Mon.-Fn. 8-4, Sat. & Sun 8-5 



Where can you meet royalty, 

chat with Ben Franklin, 

visit faraway places, 

and pursue the world's 

most popular hobby? 






A™ in the woods ft 



At Ameripex '86, 

the world's fair of stamps. 

Sunup cnlloMors and dealers the 
world over are icmiing to Chicago in May 
lor the most lavish philatelic festival ever. 
It*sj»piit)» 10 he quite a show! 

And it'll (eat tire some big names, too. 
Although Queen lilizaheth herse II can't 
come, slies sending over the ,<^&K<£v 
next best thing— rarilic* 
from the Royal Stamp 
( olleiiion— in the per- 
sonal rare of the 
Keeper ol the Royal 
( olleclion! 

1 nnk lor jiher 
• Koy.il ( '.oNeclions. too, 
plus huiulritls iil pri- 
vate exhibits inuillingan 




extraordinary 6*1,000 pages. 
Far your own collection, 
there'll be everything from 
starter packs to priceless rari- 
ties. Including the U.S. Postal 
Service's Presidential stamps 
and other colorful commemo- 
rative issues. 

For.kids only, there'll be a 
free packet containing stamps, first day 
covers, and a topical collecting kit. Plus 
games and a chance to meet Hen Frank- 
lin! And lots more! 
You'll sec it all at the 
O'l lare f:xpo Center, 
5555 N. River Rd. v 
Rosemont, II., 
Irom May 22 
through June I. 
Admission is 
$2.50aday(chil 
then under 12 
admitted live). 
Come see 
l he world at 
Ameripex 'H6! 
a S. Postal Service 

Ameripex '86 

Once In a Lifetime. 



Come and see one of the largest selections of home grown plants in this 
area. Visit our petting farm • feed the deer & goats and see the wild 
Canadian geese on our lake. 

Take A Walk On Our Nature Trail 

Thousands Of Hanging Baskets 
20 Varieties From $4.50 To $14.95 




•Geraniums - pact of two 65t - 
•Large 4" pot $1.00 - $11.75 per dozen 

•Bedding Plants • Flowers & Vegetables 
•Petunias, Marigolds, Impatience, etc. 
•Tomatoes, Peppers, Cabbage, etc. 

Mini Packs 59 C Jumbo Packs 85 c 
Mix Or Match Flat $8.75 

Large Selection Off Wild Flowers 

Large Selection Of Perennials 

Hours: 

Mon.-Fri. 8 to 8 w ~ 

Saturday 8 to 5 

Sunday 9-4 

Memorial Day 8-4 

(414) 859-2640 

Approx. 8 Miles North of Hwy. 50 

on 1-94; Turn West onto KR 

Go West I Mile To Crystal Lane 

Turn north »n Crystal Lane 



N 




Geranium Tub 
3 Geraniums 
& spike $10.95 

Perennials 
3" pot 75 C 

3" Herbs 75 c 





KtlNOlS UMItlS 





16A Lakeland Newspapers 



Thursday May 1 5, 1 986 



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[CHS Announces Standards For Exemotions From 




lis ■ Illinois v General! 

smbly has recently enac- 

legislation allowing 

[or and senior students to 

[tion for an exemption 

physical, education 

to enroll in a fifth 

Edemic course for either a 

lester or the entire year. 



There are three standards 
which will allow for such a 
petition 

If a student can prove that 
a particular course is 
required for admission to a required course, 
college or university in , - 

which he has expressed in- A senior who is faced with 
terest, he may submit a a deficiency regarding 



petition. The student must 
prove that the exemption 
from physical education is 
the only manner by which he 
can be scheduled for the 



graduation requirements A junior or senior involved 
may submit a petition for an in a varsity athletic program 
exemption from physical may ^V^f^S^t 
education. Again, the 
student must prove that the 



additional course cannot be 
added to his program, unless 
he is removed from physical 
education. 



from physical education to 
enroll in a fifth course for the 
entire year. Students 
seeking an exemption should 
contact Mr. Noonan. The 
deadline for such request is 



June 27. 

Juniors and seniors in- 
volved in' a varsity athletic 
program will be excused 
from physical education 
during the season when they 
are participating. 



rder Of The Eastern Star Has Fri 



j 





iends* Night was oo- 
zed at the April 28 
iting of the Richmond 
ipter No. 267, Order of the 



Eastern Star in the Hastings 
Memorial Temple, Rich- 
mond. 
Friends of the officers ser- 



ved in their stations and vard, Nunda, Antioch and 

most of the ladies wore Campbell Chapters of 

colorful formats. There were Illinois, as well as Lorraine 

members present from Har- Chapter of Wisconsin. 



After the meeting ad- 
journed, social time was en-, 
joyed. Refreshments were 
served at tables decorated 



with owl figurines. The owls 
are this year's Illinois Wor- 
thy Grand Matron's em- 
blem. ' . 






_•_ 



kw 



Co ntult th» Pfofyil onalt 

fl it — \ 
Born toft North] 
troy I ogon 



Barn Loft North 
trawl ag#ncy 

277 Route 173. Antioch. Illinois 60002 

(com* oftovte* 03 and 173) 



Tired Of Fighting 
Hard Water? 



tip and $mv9~ 



-C%«*( 



U-SAYE AUTO RENTAL 

Car,Rental from $16.95 per Day. 
Leasing from $149.95 per Month. 
Rent with Option to Buy. 
1 Financing Available. 




HICKS GAS 
Has The 

Economical 
Solution! 

Water Softener 
Rentals From 



*» 



! 



(312) 395-4641 
(312) 395-5920 



PmtWteks 

•FREE normal installation 
•New a charge fwsenice 
•30 day free home trial 

Call 



(312)356-8225 

For A No Pressure. No Hype Visit From 
Ou r Serv ice/Soles Representative 



HICK5GA5 



\Ctlp anJ Smw- 



010 



~* 200 E.Grond, Lake Yilia 



V.F.W. POST No. 4551 

75 E. North Avenue, Antioch, III. 

HiiiiiEinLSFit«u.«ecumK 

WEIIIISSfUTIES4UltETSaueES 

Seating Up To 500 

36 Foot Bar - Largo Dance Floor 

for Appointment Call Bob 

Anytime (312) 395-5393 

Or (312) 395-8544 





Maker* of Hand Dipped Chocolate* 
Mow Fmaturlno 

•Grand Mariner Truffles 
•.Chocolate Dipped Strawberries 

376 West Lake Street 
Antioch. Illinois 60002 

(312) 395-4950 




AT REASONABLE RATES 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 

COMPLETE LAWN CARE 

« rt *JiMfT -TRIMMING 

iPSSBSlNQ cAN -MERBtCIOlNO 

• SPRING * FALL ^ *»?; KmEMT , MAT es 

SENIOR — — : — I ' 

aSSSSfi (414) 878-3793 \ 
CHUCK'S LAWN 

FULLY 




YOU CAN TASTE 
THE DIFFERING El 



Now you can Improve the quality of the 
water you drink. The AMWAY® Water 
Treatment System effectively removes 
BSSmSi 100 EPA priority pollutants as 
well as Improving Its taste and odor. You 
can taste the difference Ir .your own 
water Call for a noobllgallon 
demonstration now, BOB BALL 

(342) 395-2388 




This spring... * 
let Duraclean® do it! 




^ 



• Announcements 

• Wedding Invitations 

• Wedding Accessories 

• Specialty Napkins 

■ • Stationery •Etc. n .okr^ 

Rsk Rbout Publishing ^^^^^nf 
Come In And See Our Lovely Selections 

30 South Whitney Street 




Duraclean is your 
trusted name for 
quality CARPET 
AND FURNITURE 
CLEANING...safe, 
thorough, faster 
drying! 

save 15% on 

spring cleaning 

special. Call Now! 



10% Disc, to Senior Citlisms 

Allthe Tlrne-Eicludes 2-« P.M. Specials 




(312)587-2356 

Scott Chirempes 

Duraclean Fabric Specialists 
Fox Lake, IL 





1145 Main Street 

(Routes 173 & 83) 

Antioch, Illinois 60002 

Family Dining 
Breakfast Lunch & Dinner 

Senior Citizen Specials 

Monday through Friday 
From 2 P.M. to 6 P.M 

Baby Beef Liver 
Pork Tenderloin 
Fried Chicken* 
Meat Loaf 
Fried Perch' 
Roast Turkey 
Fried Ham 
Sandwich Deluxe 

Soup. Salod. Choic* of 
Potato CoffM t Dtiwrt 





(312) 395-7212 



CABINETWORKS 

820 MAIN STREET (Rt. 83) 

ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 

(312)395-1666 

8 BRANDS OF KITCHEN CABINETS & 
VANITIES ALL STYLES & FINISHES 5 
LINES OF COUNTER TOPS INSTALLA- 
TION - DESIGN SERVICE 
Visit Our Now Showroom 
Tuesday - Friday 9 - 5 
Saturday - 9 - 1 



GOODYEAR 

TIRES 

MID-TOWN GMGE INC. 

865 Wain St., Antioch, IL 

(312)395-5166 

Complete Auto And 
.Truck Repair *> 

DON COLLINS, Owner 



das*Mled/1uas*-lktfadj 1: divided 
into classes or placed la a class (-ads) 

Why search all over for what 
you're looking for? Find it in 
Lakeland Newspapers! The 
REAL Classified Section. 



tn frfrland Classified | 

CAREY-GELDEN 
ELECTRIC 

889 Main Street 
Antioch, Illinois 

Commercial, Residential & Industrial 
Electric Supplies & Light Bulbs 

(312)395-4075 

Licensed & Insured 

Hour*: Mon.-Tuei.-Thuri.-Fri, 8 a.m. to * p.m. 
Wed. B a.m. lo Noon, Closed Sunday 



Data Qelivery 
Word Proce 



Prompt, accurate specialists qualified in the fields 
1 Statistical ■ Legal ■Medical ■ Insurance 



Repetitive Utters ■ Mailing Lists ■ Newsletter & Resumes 
■ Contracts ■ Cassette Transcription 
All work stored for Editing & Updating 



439 Lake Street - 2nd floor, Antioch, Illinois 60002 

(312) 395-5240 








Thursday May 15, 1986 

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Lakeland Newspapers 1 7A 






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OFWAUKEGAN 
WHO WON A 1986 RENAULT ALLIANCE 
IN THE "WHEE LS OF F ORTUNE" CONTEST 

MORE CHANCES TO 

WIN 

COMING SOON ON 



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Left to right: "Joe Renault," president of Waukegan AMC -Renault, 
Jessica Clark, Jerry Clark, Grand Prize Winner Donna Clark with 
the keys to her new 1986 Renault Alliance (background) & WXLC 
evening personality & promotions director Rich Padgen. 



FM 102.3 Stereo 



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CALL 



lassified 

Serving Lake, McHenry and Kenosha Count let 



Real Estate 
Guide 



(312)223-8161 (312)537-8400 (312)395-8700 (312)689-4600 
GRAYSLAKE FOX LAKE ANTIOCH NORTH CHICAGO 




rewewrw *^ 

■ 

E1SU8I VILLAGE. 

Jutstanding 1 bedroom 
forne with garage $55,000, 
lubject to offer. Large 
Jooms, bay windows, good 
location. 

(312)587-9231 

Walt Dill 
1-20-100 




INOUSIDE RAISED ranch. 
Perfect for young family. 4 
bedrooms, 2 baths, family 
room,. fenced yard. Close 
to schools; shopping and 
lake. One block' to train 
station, $69,900. 

(312)587-1973 
1-20-62 — 



HOME OF THE WEEK 



Cumee Quadtnei with excep- 
tionally spacious looms! This home 
features 3 bedfooms. 2 baths, ceiv I 
Hal air. finished basement, 24 car 
garage and a Franklin stove for 
Keeping utility cost km! Call foe 
your showing today. 199.900 No. 
fit 05 



< 




CMiw n LAN l S J ? ARK 

(312) 249-1010 



;irn 

2704 Grand Ave. 

Woukogon, IL 



Lakeland Classified 
Directory 



11 

Result Getting 

LAKELAND 

NEWSPAPERS 

Covering the Rapidly 

Growing Lakeland 

Bi-State Area of 

Lake County, 

McHenry County 

and Kenosha County 

KK.\i.EST.m:ca'i»K 

I • llnmrs ForSjIr 
1- KomrsWanird 

Ural KM Jlr Wanlrd 

IjA\ rV I'roiwri t 

Cfmrltr) \Ms 

Hu\ino\ IVoprrty 

Sale iHrnlal 

For ItrnL 

Itrtttatv Winird 

MuiliiinRs 

SloraRr 



KMt'l.llVMKNT CUIDK 
U • Kniplatmrnt \Rrnctr* 
IlltiildCarrUantrd 
13 -Child Can* 
IC ■ Silujtionv VV'jnlnt 
l.tlrlpttartled 
In ■ Hu>[nm Opportuniti!-* 

Kr.SIMKSK I.UIlK 
II -VhooK & Inilrucilon 

-'J- InminRi SfWHic 
t'arpfnln 
Klrrlrirnl 
numbing 

fainting & Drcufalinn 
tlf aiin(j & Air (tadiliortini' 
Vuplianrr Repair 
itadiui TVUfpair 
I'roOwiurulSeriirrv 
l-rtfal Services 
l.airndn & Cleaning 
lirnrralSrriirrs 
Undiripinj; 
Hoofing & Siding 
lllarlilup 

Cnncrrlr&Omrnl 

DuildinR Material* 

Hrrrralionliuidr 

tlutinr^s Supplln, 4. Kquipniml 

I'fi (ironming &. Hiurding 



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.MAKKKT GUIIE 

17 - llorw* 

li- r'arm AnlrnaU 

IS - Goad Th i nRs To Eil 

io . Firewood 

al-l'i-lt A Supplies 

52 • Musical Inilmmrnl* 

S3 -Antique* A Crifl* 

it • H*r»»rv 

ii - Gi ra gc A Moving Sain 

3C • Swap A Eirhangr 

ST • Misrrllanrous 

W • Camera* 

is • Furniture 

(0 • Wanted To Ku> 

it -Auctions 

K • Personals 

£3 - Notkn 

(I - Wanlrd 

«- Found 
(T • Give s«a,v 

fci. Computer* & Vidro llimrs 
S) • Money To Ijojo 
ID- I -run* WantH 
;: • Car fool-, 
n • RoaU A Motor* 
' ; I - Itecrrallonal Vehicle* 
ia - Van* 
;«• Motor rviln 
i; -Trurki* Trailrn 
;x • Farm Equipment 
?J -Mobile llonirs 
MO-Au(ol(rpair 
Kl . Aulo I'arls 
IC - Aulo* i Kent or lia*ei 
U-Auln\ For Sale 
HI t Auto* Wanted 
K.) . Saow mobile* 
M • Too I Jlr To ( lav-, i f i 

Peyment In eeeente It required 
lor these mdt: 

Adverli*er» Qui ol loheiond cif- 
culoliorl orca • Sutine** Oppor 
lunilie* ■ Garoge ond Moving 
Sal** • Debt Dixloimari • Mobil* 
Homti * Situation* Wonted • 
FourKt Adt Are fire 



Classified 

Deadline 

Tuesday 

11 a.m. 



tokelond N«w«pap.ft r.t.fv.l Ih. "Qhl lo p>op«<lr ttovvlr oil 
odverlitmg. edil or drlele ony obJMlKjriobl. wording, or i«|«Kl on* 
tidviiliiifrinerit tor credit or policy f.oton». 

All Help Wanted odvcrliwng 1» published under unrlictl hooding)- 
loUelond Ncvpopoi doet not fcnowingly a«*pl Help Warned 
ud.of imng thai in any woy violate* the Human Right* Ad 

, ADVERTISIRS 

p leate (heck your od on ihe FIRST ini.rlton dote- In the event ol on 
utroi or ommntion lah.lond Ne«»pop*'* **'" D * »<f»PO n » lbl » <<" 
ONIY the FIR SI incorrect imerlton. the nevrtpop*" v«illbele»pani.i 
bt* lor only Ihv portion ol the od lhal t* m error. Ploa\« rwttljMW 
Clovtilied Depariment in the evertl o) on error CANCtUAIIONS 
mint be mode prior lo Noon on lh* IbCidoy belor- publication 



Florida 

KEY WEST 
BY OWNER 

!arp» bayfront •■ecuflve home trim 
>iutori auwlert. Too rrxKh lo Hit 
UOD.OOQ wirh tM.OOC otwmobl* ol 

Cell (404) 974-2475 

•*«. o*- (305) 2947940 
enytlme. 



LOVELY 
WISCONSIN HOME 

A charming 7 room lomily 
horn*. Near Lokc Michigan 
and lh. j tat. lino. Feature* a 
hug* flrtt floor family room 
wilh lir.plrxe, formal living 
room, bvautiful kil chen, 3 V, 
b»cfroomt, 2% both*, heated 

Grsg*. Water right* to the 
ie. Priced in tow 80' < For 
Appointment Call: 

Mr. Knox, Broker 
(312)662-1380 

or 

(312) 872-2668 

After 5 p.m. 



OPEN HOUSt. Pisiakee 

waterfront. Saturday and 
Sunday, May 17-18, TO 
a.m. till ? All brick ranch, 
clean, easy lo maintain. 2 
bedrooms, attached 
garage, plus separate 2 
car garage/boat house, 
concrete seawall. In good 
neighborhood, convenient 
location. Come see for 
yourself. Owner relocating 
out of state. Asking 
$77,900. 130 Scenic Rood, 
Fox Lake. 

(312)587-6318 
1-20-63 



I 



neargauna.il 

Beautifully landtcaped on 2 1-3 
ocr.i. Redwood, Hone, cedar, 
horvdhewn beam*, bultl-lni, all 
electric. Perfect for Antique*, 
Country Decorating, Outdoor 
living and entertaining, Coll 
[616)646-9346. or write; 

P.O. Bok ASA 

OrandhavenMi., 49417 



MOVE IN CONDITION. 3 bedroom ranch, 
full basement, fenced yard. Only $52,000 

WHAT A DEAL. 2 bedroom ranch, full 
finished basement, wood burning 
fireplace, 2Vi car garage. Large dog run on 
2 lots. Only $59,900 

I'M 1 YEARS OLD. 3 bedroom ranch, cen 
tral air, $51 ,900 . 

Call Bev - 

(312) 546-5217 (home) 

(312) 546-2171 

Rock en bach 



BUILDING LOGS for Log 

Homes. 'We specialize" in 
hand crafted log home 
construction. Kramer 
Forest Products, Inc. HC Rt. 
2, Box 549, Park Falls, Wis. 
54552. 

1 -(715)583-2286 
evenings 

1-20-57 

S131.M MONTHLY, pick- 
up payments, house and 5 
wooded acres located 4 
miles from Hardy, 
Arkansas. Great 

retirement or vacation. 
Low taxes. Call owner. 
Bluffs Realty. 

1.(501)856-3292 

or 
1.(501)257-4363 

1-20-18 

OCALA SILVER Springs 
Shores Florida. Beautiful 
home priced right for quick 
sale. By owner. 

(312)587-0989 

1-20-40 

LAKE BLUFF area. 
Strawberry condo. Quiet. 1 
bedroom loft. fulty 
equipped kitchen, 
washer/dryer, drapes, 
fireplace, double parking 
space, pool, tennis, 
iS39.900. 

(312)831-5559 

home 

or 

(312)621-1698 

work 

Stu 

1-20-102 

LEISURE VILLAGE. 2 

bedroom home near 

recreation center 

available. $46,500. 

(312)587-9231 

Walt Oil) 

-1-20-101- 



BUVERS AND Sellers come 
together every week in 
Lakeland Classified. 
(312)223-8161 




1 1 00 • AH IQUf STRIAWS OtEAM - Lovily ?• 
ttory, 4 twaVoom country horn, eogn acre. 
lorg. lomilyroom wlrh li/.plixt lormol 
dming ond Irving rooms, tunny kitchen and 
large me*l*f *utt*. Clot, to horM (wording 
arJindWtrMtooorcireiKH.llM.no. 
FOtlrOC. INC (3131 340-9338 



1 1 01 • CXCEILENT IGCAHON . 1 750 It. com- 
mercial building piut o two twd'oom houit. 
Our 15 loll. Conv.nrl.nl location, 190 It. 
Ironlog. on highway 17] near Antioch. Zon- 
ed Commer clol. H9.W0 

Ml A rot, INC. (313| 393-7313 



SPACIOUS I GfAClOU* • On. ol lh. 
pr.ttiett home* in town, overlooking 
Memorial i*om. Solid bridi Georgian with 8 
room*. 3 piut bedroom*. 7 ceramic tiled 
boihi. entry loyer, living/dining room wirh 
traditional Colonial (iraptoc.. Cory (amity 
room with kitchen ond breokltnt counter 
adjoining. Full bavement wirh rec room ond 
onorherlireploc.. Juil lilted! II 37.000. 

KM A KM, INC (3131 333-1174 




'tOS • IMPWSSJVI WAUKICAH tAf.CH 
Seouiilul 3 bedroom home with large lomi- 
ly room, low maintenance anterior, central 
Oir plot 7 .5 cor garage. 177,900. 

KM A KM, INC (313)3*0-9333 



f 104 • HERE TOOAT ■ GONE TOMO«ltOrV| 
•lovt ly 3 bedroom cope cod oiler* large liv- 
ing room, lormol dining room, lomlty room. 
Entoy the lah* t tummer WO'i on the 
paiio. 3.S cor garage. 166.500. 

KM A KM, INC (313) 393-7313 




move m 
Thit 3 bedroom Cope Cad in eicellent con, 
dillon with hordwood lloor*, full batement. 
work (hop, laundry room on a doubt, lot. 
New garage built In 1946. 7UST IKTEDI 
1*7.900. 

KM A KM. INC (313) 333-4174 



(106 - lAUGE fAMHV WANltD • S bedroom 
home on 7 large lot*, por-lted main lloor 
, mllr room pL* J.S cor heated garage 
perfect lor o mechanic. E.lro iol l» 

bu.idobi.. in.foo 



KM A KM. »NC |313) 344-9333 



(107 • INDIAN POINI . Roomy t comlor- 
lablt 3 bedroom home with lull bot.rn.nl 
ond 7 car goroge, Silualwl on a doublt lot. 
Home li lotlelullv decorated and ihcwrt 
pride ol ownerthlp. lake ri.hl. lo Chain. 
t76,SO0. 

KM A KM, INC (313)3937313 



ilOt • BUSMESS ZONED • Commercial pro- 
perty currently uted o* rental retldenr., 
but could ecrtilr be converted into butineil 
in., large Iol, clot, lo center ol town. 
Ownef will coniiaef contract late, hum/1 
169.500. 

KM A K)E, INC (313) 333-1171 




Grayslake 
(312)223-8178 

Waukegan 
(312)662-1021 




INC. 
REALTORS 



Gurnee 
(312)360-9333 

Antioch 
(312)395-7313 



[hu.3da*M W 15i,,Jrmir ( 



m 



HOUSE HUNTING? Find 
just the home you're 
looking for in 'Lakeland 
Newspapers' Classified. 



OPEN HOUSE 
Sunday May 19tK 
Noon to •# P.M. 
4421 Harvey, Grayilaki 




Ri . 120 west of Rt. 83 lo Lake St. No. to Harvey, west lo house. 

4 bdrms, 2 V, baths, light S open. Fomily floor plan, fireplace, 
neutral decor, well landscaped, close to lake. $139,900 

Call Ruth Ann Heiler 367-1855 



400 N. Milwaukee Aw, Libertyville. 111. 
(312) 367-1855 



Baird i, Warner 



SOMERVILLE III 

$43,900 

House and garage complete on your 
lot 1 ,200 sq. ft. finished area. 
At No Extra Cost: 

R-23 Walls R-50 Ceilings 

Triple Glazed Windows Pre- finished oak trim 
Bigelow carpeting 

We have lots starting at $4,000 

LAKE AREA BUILDERS 



HW) 



(414)877-2884 

Hour*: l:30toSp.m.7dortaweek 

ond Wedrwtday evening* 6:30 • 8:00 p.m .* 

Model Location: 
314 W.Hunt, Twin Lakes 




WATERFRONT ON THE CHAIN 

Better than new 4 bedroom. 3 bath home with eat-in 
kitchen, new cabinets and appliances, a formal dining 
room, plush carpeting and custom drapes. There's also 
a full basement, 2 car garage with oversize doors and 
a steel sea wall. In town location for $147,400. 

LAKEFRONT 

Bring your boat and start enjoying the summer in your 
beautiful 3 bedroom raised ranch home. Kitchen has 
oak cabinets, no wax floors, rec room has a fireplace 
and sliding doors to the patio. 2 car garage and large 
lot makes this a real must to see for $124,000. 

TRI-LEVEL LOVELY 

This 3 bedroom home in Llndenhursf features new 
carpeting and fresh paint, a cathedral ceiling in living 
room, a finished fomily room with fireplace, o large 
utility room for mom and a 2 car garage for dad. Back 
yard is fenced for privacy and has a dog kennel. A real 

neat pockage for .' $97,500. 

CALIFORNIA CONTEMPORARY 

Beautiful S room home with an open ond airy layout, 
fireplace, central air and a basement. Huge L shaped 
deck overlooks a heavily wooded I acre lot. If you're 
looking for the perfect country setting check this one 

offered at $87,500. 

TIRED OF WORK AND NO PLAY? 

Then maybe this 2 bedroom condo in Vacation Village 
might be just the home in the country you've been 
looking for. New sliding doors and carpeting make 
this one of the nicer units available. Swimming pool, 
tennis courts and access to the chain of lakes are a 
few of the benefits of living here for only $34,900. 

LAND, LOTS OF LAND! 1 1 

Oakwood Knolls-residential lot $14,600. Rock Lake 
-5.75 acres heavily wooded with homesite cleared 
$38,000. Breezy Lawn Estates-1 plus acres, 10 lots 
available, wooded or not $21 ,000. 

MOVE RIGHT INI 

This 2 bedroom, Antioch home has already been ap- 
praised and approved by FHA and VA. Neat and clean 
home with nicely wooded lot. Born type shed and dog 
run $40,500. 

ILLINOIS & WISCONSIN 

(312)395-8600 
REALTY' 959 ****** ST - ANT,OCH . ,L 







Lakekind Newspaper. 1 9 A 



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HonwiForSttf 



IN ANTIOCH condo on 
golf course, 2 bedrooms, 
breakfast bar, central air, 
washer/dryer, dish- 
washer, garbage disposal, 
attached garage. $61 ,000. 
(312)362-9104 

1-21-104- 

ZION SY owner, Nor- 
thside. Save realtors fees. 
3 bedroom, 1V4 bath, full 
finished basement, 3 car 
garage, fenced yard, lots 
of extras. $64,900: No 
agents. 

(312)872-2042 
after 5 p.m. 

1-20-47 

HOUSE FOR sole by 
owner. 3 bedroom Iri— 
level, in Round Lake, 
$64,000. 

(312)740-9146 
after 5 p.m. 

t-20-7 

2 BEDROOM furnished 
Condo at Vocation Village, 
Fox Lake. Fireplace, 
dishwasher, balcony over 
looking pool, clubhouse 
and morino, tennis. 24 
hour securtly. Asking 
545,000. By owner. 
(312)546-4764 

1 .20-7 1 

COME LIVE in the Ozorks 
near Table Rock Lake. 
Comfortable home in a 
quiet town where cost of 
living is low and pace of 
life is stow. Also have 
other homes, cabins, 
businesses, lots and 
acreage available. Coll or 
write Bonnie Nelson al 
Carol Jones Realtors, Box 
2052. Lakeview, MO. 
65737. 

1.(417)272-8410 

or 

1 -(417)739-2034 

after 5 p.m. 

1-20-118 

A LAKELAND News- 
paper's Classified ad can 
help you turn unwanted 
items into cash. To sell 
almost anything, just call 
our office nearest you. 
(312)223-8161 




Wi BUY HOUSES 
FOR ALL CASH 

Ermac 
Investments 
(312) 587-8234 



,'<■■ :-£^^&.C.\ ; *fc;>Jv 



f 

lott*Prop#rty 



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WAUCONDA COUNTRY 

side. Build your dream 
home now! Beautiful 1 
acre plus lot, south slope, 
mature oaks, lake rights, 
peaceful. By owner. 
(715)386-5833 

4-21-41 

FOX LAKE vacant hillside 
lot, 100 x 120 It. City 
water. 512,000. 

(312)627-5694 

4-21-64 

Busintss Pfdptrty 
SitolReMil 

' DESK SPACE, Grand Ave. 
office, Fox Loke. Monthly 
rent includes answering 
service. Coll Bill 
Schroeder. 

(312)223-8161 

6-TF-6 

BUYERS AND Sellers come 
together every week in 
Lakeland Classified. 
(312)223-8161 



WAUCONDA OFFICE 
1440 square feet. 

New carpet, balh, and 
ceiling, S690 per 
month, 

(312)446-2672 



ST. MAARTIN 

(Caribbean) 

Jltt«tO« Itmfot Oil KM HI Illl in 

hull Iff U Vwtii ? MOW* 1 Ml. ? 
mnuii will It i Ui in*!) buck. < ir»Uta 
itji be ' una ji mi Lift o*ji a wndtilf «*« J 
(■) ictp I to iiu)«* »• i tt \ 

(617) 879-6444 

evenings 

(617| 626-1308 



COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 
FOR RENT/SALE 

Approx. 5,000 sq. ft. of 

firime property, 2 
evels with air condi- 
tioning with a this 
lower level for storage. 
Good parking area. 
Must see to appreciate. 
Lease $1 ,000 per month 
or buy for $79,900. j 

(312) 223-8161 



• CROSSWORD PUZZLE * 



ACROSS 



1. 

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11. 
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29. 
30. 
31. 

33. 
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36. 

37. 
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40. 



Baseball club 

Boat 

Automobile 

Employ 

Behind time 

The first man 

Formed 

Tilt 

Father 

Downcast 

Cooking vessel 

Pot cover 

Hurried 

Buddy 

Current 

Assist 

Feminine 

pronoun 

Stout 

You and I 

Member of the 

Senate 

Thus 

Triumph 

Man's best 

friend 

Not high 

Twirl 

Honeymaker 



41. 
42. 

43. 
44. 
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Source of coal 
Allow 
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sherry _ 
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54. Deposit 

55. Small building 
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Winter vehicle 
Owned 

Neuter pronoun 
Flower leaf 
Bottle cover 
Newspaper 
notice 
Quick 



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Marched 

Illuminated 

Carpenter's tool 

Crusty dessert 

Writing tool 

Black roofing 

material 

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Mist 

Vice 

Foot digit 

Male child 

Be in debt 

Humor 

Small 

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Danger 

Farm buildings 

Floor covering 

Mother 

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WAUCONDA MAIN Street 
office space, 400 sq. ft, 
rear of travel 

agency/shared entrance, 
$195 per month plus 
utilities. 

(312)526-3600 

6-24-28 

SHARK DOWNTOWN An- 
. tjpch office on Maln.-St., 
Ideal for professional or 
semi-professional. No 
lease required. Can in- 
clude minimal reception 
service. Call Bill 
Schroeder. 

(312)223-8161 

-*-TFr7- 

SUPERBLY BUILT brick 
building in Grayslake 
commercial/industry loca- 
tion. Rent. buy, 
tease/purchase. You tell 
us. Available Immediately. 
Lease $1000 per month or 
buy for $79,900. 

(312)223-8161 

days 

Mr. Kirchhardi 

6-TF-21 



MCHENRY, CLEAN, 

secure, quiet, heat, water, 
kitchen appliances, ' car- 
peting. 

(312)381-2059 

-7-20-43 

SALEM, WIS., beautiful 
new, 2 bedroom apart- 
ments, stove, refrigerator, 
dishwasher, " disposal 
included. Security locked, 
adults preferred, $345 to 
$375 monthly, 

(414)843-2504 

or ■ 
(414)843-3400 

7-20-68 

FOUR BEDROOM apart- 
ment to share, Spring 
Grove area. $250 monthly 
utilities included. One 
child OK. 

(312)587-2849 
7-20-65 



Prestigious building In 
Lake Street in Anlioch. 
60,100 sq. ft., will divide. 
Price negotiable. 

KOENIG & STREY 

(312)362-6200 



Modetn building 1500 to 1900 sq. ft. 
eicellent location. Wiuconda «ei. 

(3n)S3«-93M 

etare 

|31]|>l*-3»l« 



1 & 2 Bedroom. 
Apartments 

available In a security 
building. ■ heat furnished, 
air-conditioned, fully 
carpeted, appliances in- 
clude dishwasher. Patios, 
balconies, tennis courts 
and fishing on the lake. No 
pets. 

Monday • Friday, 9 to 5. 

(312) 356-2002' 




REALTORS" 

Mdkt" The 
Difference! 



SUBLET CENTER SUITE 

On First floor south 
lido of building "L" 
shaped with ap- 
proximately 1,075 
Foot space. 

Office Use. 

HttflAtt Off O WILDING 

800 N. Main Street 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 

(312) 362-9050 



LIQUOR STORE 

Thriving Business 

Located in Elkhorn, Wis. 

$300,000. annual sales. 

Land contract available. 

Contact Lou Leon. 

IIIWIHO HnUTKIT HEILTT 
(414) 272-6010 



HIDDEN GLEN 

Townhome in Fox Lake 
Two bedroom, den, 
balcony, patio, 1 '/j 
bains. Fully carpeted, 
all appliances including 
washer-dryer, 
dishwasher, garbage 
disposal. Central air, 
swimming pool, tennis 
court and optional 
Cable TV. 

$525 Per Month 

(312)587-0030 



TWItSlWOOWfTtTUVWG 

IngloiidVGrayilake 
Richmond Locations. 

Spacious one and 
two bedroom apart- 
ments available for 
immediate occupan- 
cy. Wall to wall 
carpeting, coor- 
dinated color ap- 
pliances, laundry 
and storage 

facilities. Small pets 
welcome in selected 
apartments. Chain 
of Lakes nearby. 

Thrto locations from f 349. 

Coll today for mora 0111111. 

(312) 587-9277 








GRAYSLAKE - FOR SALE OR LEASE 

Almoit 5,000 »q. li. lolld brick 3 ttory building wllh hvovy duly •!«■ 
trlcol Inpul. Idvol wouhoun locllltl** -or chiui with biohvr on u*«> • 
\7 .60 >q It. • l»o>« or pure hot • at J79, WO. 

Call J. Murrio 
POE & POE REALTORS 

352 Center Street 
Grayslake, Illinois 

(312) 223-8178 



FOR LEASE OR SALE 

Grayslake-General Business Zoned 
Brick 2 story building-5,000 sq. ft.-2 
floors. Air conditioned with gas hot 
water heat, heavy duty electrical 
input. Good downtown location, 
GREAT opportunity to begin your 
own business at reasonable rate. 
Large parking area. Lease at $1000 
per month or buy for $79,900. 

POE & POE 

(Formerly Murrie & Behm Realtors) 

352 Center St. — Grayslake, IL 

(312) 223-8178 



HAIff IPUL HOUf I. Alio 2 

bedroom apartment , Bo I h . 
overlooking Nlpperslnk 
Lake. 

(312)587-1121 

Carol Goshgarlon 

Manager 

7.20- 17- 

1 OR 1 bedroom apart- 
ments for rent, carpeted, 
air conditioning, furnished 
or unfurnished. Near bus 
line, $350 or $450. 
(312)662-0631 

7-20-96 

ATTRACTIVE 2 room 
apartment In Round Lake 
Beach. $325 per month, all 
utilities Included, 

(312)546-1100 
7-20-103 



ifiWtllMlOfAMOML 

Large main living area, 1 
small bedroom, ' kit- 
chenette. In town location. 
O30 per month plus 
utilities. 

(312) 643-4484) Evenings 
(312) 537.3234 Days 



GRAYSLAKE 
APARTMENTS 

Rental Units from 
$435 Immediate 

Occupancy 

Luxury new 1 
bedroom plus den 
and 2 bedroom 
apartments with 

large separate din- 
ing room, air condi- 
tioning, carpet, op- 
tional dishwasher, 
laundry facility, 

balcony or patto, in 
private setting. 

Located off Route 
120 one mile west of 
Route 83 to Neville 
Dr., left on Neville 
and follow signs. 

Marling Management 
(312)680-7700 



Hemlli Wlfhwd 

YOUNO COUPU with 2 
children would like to rent 
or with option to buy 3 
bedroom home In Lake or 
McHenry county. 

Reasonable rent, needed 
before August 1. Referen- 
ces available. 

(312)587-7581 

after 5:30 p.m. 

8-20-144 



I 



^TI 



BuiMftat 



i 



■UlLDINa FOR sale. By 
owner. In Lakemore. 
Second floor 2 bedroom 
apartment, first floor store 
front. $89,000. 

(312)297-4719 
— , 9-20-106 



POLE BUILDINGS 

Horse Barns, 
Riding Arenas, 
Storage & Com- 
mercial Buildings 
and Fencing, - 

15 Years Experience 
Call Fred Doane at 

(414) 728-9806 

DOME 
CONSTRUCTION 



1x2! 

I Sounds like | 

multiplication? Ow- f 

t.eai again. It's f 

newspaper talk lor T 

• a one column by 2- k 

Inch ad. Too small f 

»to be etfoctlvef 1 

you're reading this f 

\st -J 



Employment j 
Guide J 




■ABYSITTIft for 2 school 
age bays, 3 days per week, 
Lindenhurst family, prefer 
sitting in your home. 
(312)356-2052 
after6 p.m. 

1 4-20-50 • 

CHILD CAM needed in our 

Grayslake home for 2 

adorable youngsters. 

(312)223-3138 

after6p.m. 

1 4-20-52 

NEED SITTIH for 6 year 
old. Fox Lake area. Must 
have references and 
reliable transportation. 
Flexible hours, excellent 
pay. 

(312)587-2548 
- ^ 1 4-20-61 



c 



CtiUdCftrg 



> 



WILL DO babysitting in my 
Fox Lake home, either full 
time or part-time. Between 
6 a.m. -6 p.m. weekdays, 
any age, hot lunches and 
plenty of play orea. Very 
reasonable rates, ex- 
cellent references. 
(312)587-4971 
after 4 p.m. 
15-20-5 




BEL'S WOIO Processing 
Service. Resumes, multiple 
letters, envelopes, 
reports. Reasonable rates. 
Pick up and delivery 
available. 

(312)546-4696 

16-21-1 

NEED INTEIIOt 

decorating? Call for that 
finishing touch. 

(312)356-2060 

Sherl 

16-20-4 ■ 




TYPIST fSM/weekly at 
home! Information? Send 
Self addressed stamped 
envelope to: Typist-P 12133 
304th Ave. Trevor, Wis. 
53179. 

—17-20-55 



CLEANING /OFFICE 

Early evenings, Pernio* 
menl pari lime position. 
Ideal for husband and wile 
job. Car necessary. 

Call: 

(312)398-8698 



SALES 
POSITION 

Experienced, ag- 
gressive, highly 
motivated 
selfstarter, to sell 
light fixtures and 
accessories in our 
showroom plus out- 
side sales, by call- 
ing on home 
builders. Salary 
plus commission, 
and group 
insurance. 
' Apply: 

Warren Electric 

33261 N. Hwy. 45 
Wildwood, II. 

(3121223-86911 



|^B^^ ^tff^.^^^ 



1 



JOSS FOR , Journalists. 

Newspapers have jobs for 
qualified candidates. Call 
or write: Database Career 
File, 130 East Epler Ave., 
Indianapolis, IN 46227. 
I -(317)788-9533 
17-20-20 



SALES/NON SALES 

McHenry company Is 
looking for forty peo- 
ple. Part time in sales 
and non sales area. 
Can lead to full time. 
Must be 18 years or 
older. No experience 
necessary. 



Mfsr 



IunIsa 



(815)34441729 



MARKETING 

REPRESENTATIVES/ 

MODELS 

Marketing represen- 
tatives/ models 
wanted for shopping 
mall promotion. 

Weekend 
assignments. 

Jobs/Victor 

Temporaries 

(312) 336-0164 



•Siln 

JEWELRY SALES 
Full and Part Time 

Lakehurst Mall 

A FRESH START f 

It's never too lite to start in 
an ucitins new position with 
The Whitehall Company. 

To qualify, you should hate 
previous retail vales ei- 
perience, preferably in 
jewelry or i fashion related 
area. 

In addition to a fresh start, 
we provide an excellent star- 
ting salary plus commission, 
profit sharing and other fine 
benefits. PJease Call: 

Ann Tyler 

(312) 473-4*00 

THE WHITEHALL 
COMPANY 

equal opportunity employer m/l 



Sif MRS etWSEUR 

(Pert - Tint*) 

Our savings department rs in im- 
mediate need ol in individual to 
describe and open savings, check- 
ing, and money nurket accounts. 
We seek a self -starter with good 
human relation skills as well good 
arithmetic aptitude. 
We otter a pleasant working en- 
vironment and opportunity for 
growth. Salary commensurate with 
qualifications and work history. 
Direct or related experience prefer- 
red. If qualified cat! personnel 

(.12)U2-lHltit.244 




354 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libert yville, Illinois 60048 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

W* ore a limited smoking locillty 



*- CHILD CARE SPECIALIST 
* -RECREATIONAL SPECIALIST 

If you are looking for a challenging career in the human 
services field, we have super opportunities for you. We 
have entry level positions at a residential treatment 
center for emotionally/behaviorally disturbed boys. 
Degree in human services/theraputic recreation prefer- 
red. Experience with Autistic and Schizophrenic 
children is a plus. 

Excellent benefits, Salary range $12,000 to $17,500 a 
year and $13,000 to $18,000 a year. 



* 



Please Send Resume To: 
Becky Farrell * 

Allendale School 

P.O. Box 277 
Lake Villa, Illinois 



Thursday May 15,1986 



*£&tVJ£ fiS-'ft 5TS 



Employment 
Guide 



■ 



Htip WiMtd 



FULL TIME; 
TEMPORARY 
POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

For opening and sorting or stuff- 
ing mail. No special skills re- 
quired, positions lasting 8 
weeks. We will tiain. 
Call: 
Henrietta Powell 
Monday through Friday 
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
(31 3) 362-0310 
H. OLSEN & CO. 
343 N. Fourth St. 
Ubertyvtlle. II. 



MEN'S FORMAL 
WEAR STORE 

Seeking well groomed 
mature Individual (or, 
full time position. 

2 Years Retail 
Experience Preferred 
Salary & Commission 

Henry' i Formal Wear 
Lakehurst Mall 

(312) 473-0559 



STATEMENT 
CLERK 

Part Time 

ImnwJiiU p*1 fjnt pw<«* «IJ»N( n 
am Stitmem tncramt Orfalnot. 
meirt itn IM'im, to 130 pn. Sir*- 
d/i / 00 i m U I 04 ? ™ Mia >*d«lt 
IN prectmflf i*d bilMQitf cf bjrt 
Cirtiocwr Uitnmsti Mul l«l<iit mm] 
tx <V;x*djW« u*J Hi wgrLif mlBl 
Siu ii I torn mtirtid arpirtntil f « tp- 

SC.nlrx.tt pUtU CWUCt 

PREMIER 
PROCESSING CORP. 

Mundelein, II. 

(312)566-4801 



PHOTO SALES 

$500 p«r week minimum 
guaranteed alter first two 
weeks of training on com- 
mission. -Show to mothers 
beautiful color photos of 
Iheir babies already taken. 
Pleasant congenial selling 
practically pretold. fly ap- 
pointment only. Car is 
necessary. Part-time posi- 
tions also available. 

Call 

(312)5244)303 



HOUSEKEEPER POSITIONS 
PART TIME STORE CLERK 

U.S. VACATION RESORTS WOOSTER LAKES. INGL6S1DE. 
Is now accepting applications for full time housekeeping 
personnel, and part time store clerk. Enjoy excellent com- 
pany paid benefits while working in an extremely plea- 
sant resort setting. Only serious, mature individuals need 
apply. 

Weekends Required 

Contact 

Steve Oauntt 

Operations Manager _ 

(312) 546-7477 



NURSING ASSISTANTS 

Part-Time 

7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
3:00 p.m. to 11 :00 p.m. 
Certification Necessary 

APPLY IN PERSON 

HILLCREST RETIREMENT 

VILLAGE, LTD. 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 
Round Lake Beach, IL 

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



RECEPTIONIST 
General Office 

This interesting job requires typing skills, 50 wpm, 
switchboard experience and the ability to perform 
diversified duties with an eye for details and deal with 
our visitors in a professional manner. A minimum of 3 
years related experience is required. 

Excellent starling salary and benefits Including com- 
pany paid life and medical insurance, vacations, 
holidays, and profit sharing. 

Coll For Interview. 

(312) 546-8225 

f—f THE GRIEVE CORPORATION 

IQI SOO HART ROAD 
bs«jJ ROUND LAKE. ILLINOIS' 



SECRETARY/ RECEPTIONIST 

We have an immediate entry level full 
time opening for a person having a 
pleasant professional telephone man- 
ner and accurate typing skills. Primary 
duties would include answering and 
directing telephone calls, greeting 
visitors and assisting with various. 
clerical projects including composition 
and typing of routine correspondence. 
Equestrian experience helpful but not 
mandatory. • 

Apply In Person 
Monday-Friday 
9a.m. to 5 p.m. 

306 Petersen Rd. (Hwy 137) 
'. Liberlyvlllo, III. 




1 



' " e*#f SS; essssssj 



DC 



■ ■*">■? : ■ :- 



'<" : ■*■"'. 



!> in- 



nPp WlrtMG 



Experienced 
TREE CLIMBER 

With at least 2 years 
experience needed. 

Call: 
(312; 5*68733 

Rocky or Lee 
W.W.TBEI SERVICE 




rssep WeneVD 



In Tse Tessssnrtf fctsssstteit 

6«tween jobs or i recent judujte 
intt need ttmponry or.rejuili hull It 
imuiince outrage? 

M Start Fin lent 
lw)«ntiiit(112)lM-2111 

About short-teim or ieiulir hospital- 
surgical insurance. 



LANDSCAPE 

CONSTRUCTION 

FOREMAN 

lmm*dio> Opportunity For Ei- 
p*rl«K«d - Worfcln a Foreman 
Capable Of Oroonlilna And 
leading Comlrucllon Oewt. 

Applicant thoutd be able to 
op*<ol» londKoping equipment. 
»• lomlllor with plonl material 
and common Kortkutrurat proc- 
IkM. tellable Ironiportotlon and 
good driving record a mutt. Send 
prtvlow* work hlilory lo the 
Flther Burton Co., P.O. Bon tS06, 
Polai In*. IL 60079. or Phone. 

(312) 366-9200 

Equal Opportunity Employtf 




>w hibii 
■mAVJUi 

Also taking op plication* for 

IMMIMMOYM1 

Apply In Pmnon 



5555 W . Grand Ave. 
■ ■■ ■ ■■,IL 

(Next to Great America) 



TEACHER WANTED 

Full Time Science Teacher. 1st Semester only 
of the 1986-87 school year. Biology and 
Chemistry classes. 

Position to start August 21, 1986 and run 
through January 16, 1987. Contact 
Superintendent Gary Allen, 

Anticch Community High School 

,'1 133 South Main Street 

Antioch, Illinois, 60002 

(312)395-1421 



RECORDS CLERK/SECRETARY 

Full Time 

General Office Skills Necessary. Prior 
Police Dispatching Helpful. Salary 
Commensurate With Experience. 

Apply In Person 
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

Fox Lake Police Department 

i 301 S. Route 12, Fox Lake, Illinois 



CLERK 

SHIPPING, RECEIVING, STOCKROOM 

Excellent opportunity for person with good 
work record. Must be familiar with electronic 
component Identification, UPS and shipping, 
computer terminal experience helpful but not 
necessary. 

Apply in person 

9:00 A.M.-4:00 P.M. 

No phone calls please 

NORCON ELECTRONIC LABS, INC. 

355 Hollow Hilt Rd. 
(North of intersection of Old Rand Rood and Bonner) 

Wauconda, III* 

Equal opportunity employer. 



<l 



retail 

Opportunites Are Available 

for Experienced Personnel 

and Trainees! 

* DEPARTMENT HEAD (Full Time) 

If you have supervisory experience in a retail 
environment, we have an excellent position , 
for you. Qualifications should include work- 
king for department store or retail store | 
[specializing in either of the following: linens, j 
(draperies, towels, crafts, etc. 

* STOCK LADIES /STOCK MEN 

(Some light lifting. No experience necessary 
ire will train. Full or Part Time. 

* SECURITY 

■Full or Part Time. Previous experience helpful I 
but will train qualified candidates. 

'CASHIERS 

Full or Part Time. Previous experience helpful 
but will trainee, individuals with good math 

skills. , , j, 

We offer good salaries with outstanding com- 
pany benefits Including a generous employee 
discount. Applications will be accepted bet- 
ween 9a.m-4 p.m., Monday thru Friday. 



Itfaccomaw 

otterij 



1400 E. Golf Rd. 

Jnear Goll Rd. & Algonquin Rd.) Rolling Meadows, 11.^ 

on equal opportunity employer m/f 



SMART CAR Buyers shop 
Lakeland Classified first.' 
Turn your car into cash th'e 
quick and easy way. 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 
SUMMER JOBS 

$7.19 To Start 

Full J. Part-Time 
Hours 

interview now stirt liter finals. Mint 
be 1 8 or older with car. 
(312) 249-3444. e»». II 
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 



EARN EXTRA money. 
'Work close to home. Be on 
Avon Lady. 

(312)566-0990 
1 7-TF-37 — 




- Semi-Dumps 

Proparo For Noxt 
Winter Mow/ 

(Trailers Available) 
HI SI 



The Lambs 
Country Inn 

a full service restaurant 
in Libertyville, is look- 
ing for a Part-Time and 
Full Time Cook. Apply 
In Person 

The Lambs Farm 

Junction 1 94 & Rt. 176 
Libertyville 



TEACHERS, 
AIDES, SUBS. 



in 



For pre-school 
Round Lake. Full 
and part-time, ex- 
cellent benefits. - 

Call: 

(312) 5464383 



GENERAL OFFICE 

Progressive woman's gar- 
ment manufacturer in Lake 
Bluff has immediate 
fulltime position for office 
assistant. Variety of duties 
including phone contact, 
customer service, and typ- 
ing. Accurate typing skills 
and pleasant phone manner 
important. Opportunity to 
learn memory typewriter and 
computer skills. 

Calf Personnel 
(312)234-9491 



RESIDENT MANAGER COUPLE 
OR 

Team Wanted For 

Full time position in Antioch. Experience prefer-, 
red, but will train the right people. Send resume 
including salary requirements to: 

MADSEN CORPORATION 

P.O. Box 396 

Rochelte, II.. 61068 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



medical opply. 

RIM'S 

North Suburban Clinic "ho* 
opening* for our new Hoffman 
Eiloies facility In; 

•SURGERY- 2* hour* per' week. 
Orthopedic or Ophthalmology 
experience preferred. 
•IMMEDIATE CARE- PM'», port 
time. 

Apply at T7S6 Moonlohe Blvd. 
(Borrington S Hlggln* Rd*) Hoff- 
man Eilole*. II., or call (312) 
865-0400 and leave number. 



Now Accepting 
Applications For 

Full & Port-Time 

A.M. & P.M. Shifts 

*WAIT STAFF 

*BUS STAFF 

* HOSTESS 

Apply In 

Person Only 

Monday • Friday 

Between 10 a.m. & 2 p.m. 

Holiday Inn 
of Gut nee 

6161 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee 






TECHNICIANS 

Inventory research, development, and quality control 
work In various professional settings. We require a 
minimum of an Associates Degree, prefer Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Micro-Biology, Biology, and or 
Chemistry. Experience in related Laboratory work is re- 
quired. Immediate openings, good wages, and fringe 
benefits. 

Call For An Appointment: 

MANPOWER 

**■ ' Technical Services 
Gurnee Mundelein 

(31 2) 623-6880 (31 2) 949-4 1 00 

equal opportunity employer 






Part - Time 
*ART TEACHER 

Grades 7-8 

1 period per day 
Part - Time 

* SOCIAL STUDIES 
TEACHER 

2 periods per day 

The above 2 positions 
could be combined for 
a 1 half-time position. 

*1 -FULLTIME 
TEACHER 

Certified for Learning 
Disability Resources 
room. Special Educa- 
tion Supervisory Cer- 
tification Desirable. 

Contact 

Gus Nizzi 
(312)223-6118 

For more information 
before sending resume 

Groyslake School Gist. 46 
r.BAYSI AKC 



WIDEN YOUR WORLD WITH 
FUN & FRIENDSHIP AT 
GREAT AMERICA! 



Thursday May, 15, 1986 




Z?\ 



If you're fun-loving and hard- 
working, then got ready for the 
most rewarding experience of 
your life at Six Flogs Groat 
America! 

Attention housewives, senior citi- 
zens and third shift workers. Great 
America is now accepting appli- 
cations for our three week "tem- 
porary program." These positions 
are Monday-Friday day shift from 
May 19fh - June 6th. Besides 
being a great experience, you 
will receive our regular salary, 
complimentary tickets and free 
admission. 

A World of Special Events 

In addition we are still accepting 
applications for our regular 
seasonal positions: 

• Food Services 

.• Ride Operations/Admissions 

• Clerical 

• Show Operations 

• Merchandise 

Appry in person, 

Sunday - Saturday, 9:00 am - 5 pm 

Employment Office: Route 21 (Between 
Grand Ave.flt Washington 51.1 
Gurnee, IL 60031 

(312) 249-1776 

on equal opportunity employer 

COME, WIDEN YOUR WORLD! 



MAY AMIMCA 



TM 



A QiA) Company 



Lakeland Newspapers 21 A 



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Employment 



Guide 






$1M0 WEEKLY! Mailing 
letters. Free supplies! 
Postage! Write: SST, 1123 
South Broad St, Box 204- 
LN.Phila., PA 19147 
— 1 7-27- 1 5 



if 



MttotftAtod 



EASY WORK at home. No 
sales. Good money, send 
stamped addressed en- 
velope. H. First. Box 144, 
Highwood, II. 60040. 
17-20-2 






BENCH ASSEMBLERS 

Light work, simple assembly and wiring opera- 
tion. Some experience is assembly, wiring and 
working with hand tools. Start at $6.61 per hour, 
automatic increases to $6.91 per hour. Oppor- 
tunity to advance to higher paying position. 

Company Paid Benefits Include: 

•Commprehensrve Medical Insurance 

•$20,000 Life Insurance 

•11 Holidays 

•Weekly Accident & Sickness 

•Vacation 

•Pension Plan 

Apply 7:30 a. m to 4:30 p.m. . 
Monday-Friday 

THE GRIEVE CORPORATION 

300 HART ROAO 
ROUND LAKE. ILLINOIS 




DENTAL ASSISTANT 

Progressive Orthodontic office desires to 
hire chairside assistant. 'Prefer person 
with previous training and experience 
but will trian person with right qualifica- 
tions. Need to be attractive, neat, non- 
smoker, right handed, good sense of 
humor, and congenial. 

Salary will be commensurate with 
previous training and abilities. Bonus in- 
centive plus favorable hours. 

Dr. Wayne A. Mors 

Specialist in Orthordonics 

4306 G. Crystal Lake Rd. 
Mchenry, II., 60050 

(815)344-4900 



YOUR SKILLS 

Our growing group of Illinois and Wisconsin 
Newspapers has several opportunities open 
now in a fast-paced, exciting field. 

Part-time Driver 
With Own Van 

Applications are being taken for a driver with own 
van to deliver newspapers to Post Offices and 
stores on Wednesdays only. Must be reliable and 
have references. Will work from 9 a.m. until 
finished. Ideal part-time job for night worker. 

Contact BUI Schroeder, Jr. 

Marketing Manager 

Circulation Clerk 

Lakeland Newspapers needs a mature person with 
organizational skills for clerical duties in a grow- 
ing circulation department. Must be service 
oriented and have knack for public relations. Nor- 
mal office experience required. Some data pro- 
cessing knowledge helpful. Person who enjoys 
minimal supervision will be comfortable in this 
challenging position. Lakeland Newspapers offers 
full hospital insurance, vacation benefits and pro- 
fit sharing. 

Contact William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



To Investigate any of these opportunities, con- 
tact the individual listed, or call us today. 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

(312)223-8161 

30 S. Whitney , P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 



n 




Htto WMfcd 

: :.v;r.;-:.. ' ■ ■■■:-.. 



m 



* 







■ ■- - ;l" * J -.y ? "'': -' '*• ■' 




WHETHER YOU'RE looking 
for an employer or an em- 
ployee, Lakeland's Em- 
ployment Guide will make 
your search a success, 



HOUSE HUNTING? Find 
jusl the home, you're 
looking for in Lakeland 
Newspapers' Classified. 
(312)223-8161 




CNA 
Full Time 
Day Shift 

Skilled, intermediate 
care facility. Excellent 
company benefits, 
highly commensurate 
salary.' 

(312) 4?* 8275 

9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
Monday through Friday 



DISPATCHER 

Immediate opening 
for communication 
dispatch center. 

(312)433-4357 

ask for Ruth 



LAST CALL FOR 
SUPERVISORS 

Yes, it's a new Party 
Plan, now hiring 
Area , Supervisors. 
Set your own hours, 
earn good income 
and hove fun show- 
ing Christmas Decor 
from Around ihe 
World. No 
Investment. 

Call collect immediately 

(414) 694-7416 

(North of Hwy. 176) 
Call collect immediately 

(815) 728-1387 

(South of Hwy. 176} 



MAINTENANCE 
PERSON 

Part Time 

Evenings and weekends. 
1 2-1 5 hours per week 
* Apply In Person 

MAJESTIC III CLEMEIS 

736 Hawlhornt Villoge Common* 
Vernon Hills. II. 



Banking 

TELLER 
FULL TIME 

We're willing lo train an In- 
dividual with coin handling 
experience and ifrong public 
contact skill*. Wo provider 
paid vacations, holiday* and 
other line benefit! with thl* 
petition at our Anlioch 
office. 

For complete delalli, pleaie 
contact: 

(312) 524-5614 

Great American 
Federal Savings 

«)uj! opportunity employer m/l 



Full Or Port - Time 

EMPLOYMENT 

Flexible Hours Weekdays Or Weekends 
Horse Experience Helpful, But Not Required. 

. ,„ . Apply In Person 

Mondoy.Fridoy 
9 a.m. lo 5 p.m. 

306 Peterson Rd. (Hwy. 137) 

Libertyville, III. 




SNACK SHOP ATTEND ANT 

Must be 21 years of age. No 
experience necessary. 

Apply in person . 

Fox Lake Country Club 

7220 State Park Road 
Fox Lake, II. 



CASHIERS 

FULL & PART TIME 

Join the team at Sweeney's Foodworks. o dynamic 
chain of gas slations/convenience marts expanding 
throughout Chicago. Our busy stores in Cicero, Lake 
Zurich, Wauconda, and Palatine need friendly, effi- 
cient Cashiers to be an important part of our team. 
Training, benefits, and management opportuntles. 
Call: 

Arthur (312) 237-7528 



SWEENEY'S FOODWCMKS 

m^mmfm'm'^mm'W mt loit Zurich, Womondo.Polal.rit.CKno 

t" 

STORE HOSTESS 

•Work Weekends (Thurs.*Fri. or Sat.) 

'Work only 5 Hours A Day 

•Demonstrate Food Samples, Taste Testing, Pass Out 

'Coupons, Etc, 

If you arc pleasant outgoing and reliable you con qualify. No 
experience required. 

KLLM J fe iri " 

SERVICES 

Llbortyvlllo (312) 367-1144 

North Shore (312) 869-7790 

Miles (312) 635-1080 

Schaumburg ....(312) 683-0444 

Wheeling -(312) 439-60O9 

Pickup a free copy or Work-Styte Mogailno just for register- 
ing, and ontor our Kelly Spoilt Success swoop slakes. No pur- 
chose or payment required. 

Hot an ogoncy . nevor a fa* 



•Waitresses 

•Bar Tenders 

' *Bus Persons 

Apply In Person 
ANDRE'S STEAK HOUSE 

(M Mil«N. of Rt«. 173 on U.S. 12] 

Richmond, Illinois 

f8 15) 678-2671 



RECEPTIONIST 

North. Suburban Clink, Hoff- 
man Ellotw n«*d» r»c»plloni»t 
tor our IMMEDIATE CARE 
DIPT., port Itmo, pm'i and 
wmkertdi at 1786* Moonloh* 
Blvd. (noor Harrington ■ Hig- 
glm Rdi) Hoffman Etlalot, II.. 
or tall B85 -0400 loov* numbaf . 



*Mooog#r Train** 

* Auittant Monof*r 

*HourlyH*lp 

Fast growing chain. 
Help needed In Liber- 
tyville and Round Lake. 
Opening soon In An- 
lioch and Fox Lake. 

Apply in Person 



%IMk 



9606 E. Rollins Rd. 
Round Lake Beach 



LIBRARY PAGE 

4 Hours Per Day 

1 1 Vi Hours Per Week 

$3.65 Per Hour 

Must be 16 

For More Information 

Call: 

(312)546-7060 

ROUND LAKE 
AREA LIBRARY 

442 Codar Lake Rd. 
Round Loko, II. 



DIRECTOR 
OF NURSING 

To work in a beautiful 
Waukegan in- 
termediate core facili- 
ty. Previous experience 
helpful. Good salary 
and benefits. 

Please contact: 

Mrs. Satterf ield 

at 

Boy tide Terrace 

(312)244-8196 



FULL TIME 

GENERAL 



DUTIES 

with some computer 

knowledge. 

Apply In Person 

Between 9 a.m. & 12 
noon \ 

Ask For Judy 
(312) 362-14O0 

Bernard Chevrolet 

Libertyville 



Experienced 
BODY MAN 

With references 

STERLING FINISH 
AUTO BODY 

Ask (or Gordon or Gary 

(312) 2234522 



GROW LONG NAILS 

Dynamic company will 
train responsible peo- 
ple to work as 
Manicure Consultants.. 
No experience needed. 
Work in your area. 
Have beautiful, profes- 
sional nails, flexible 
hours, and earn good 

$$: 

NAILTIQUE, INC 
(312)223-8260 



THE SETTLE INN 

Cooks, Bartenders, 
Waitresses, and 
Dishwashers 
needed. 

Experience and a 
positive attitude 
required. 

THE SETTLE INN 

(312) 587-8111 



retail 



TRAK AUTO 



Managerial Positions 
Arlington Heights & Mundeteln Areas 

Du« to rapid •xooni Ion, Irak Aula a leading ovtomoltv* aft»rmarh»t 
ralallw, hoi op«nJngt In tK« following catvgorlvt: 

* ENTRY LEVEL MANAGER 

1 r«ar or mora or r«loil «ap«ri«fKO. Will train Into o monogoflol 
petition. 

* ASSISTANT MANAGERS 

2 y»o«« or root • or •'•tall mongtmont «*p«f Imc*. 

A background In iup«rmark«t, diKounl rolail tlora, or tlmltor will bm 
contktarod, 

Call between 8:30 a.m ■ 12 Noon 430-2391 

on oqual opportunity «<nploy*f 



ALLENDALE SCHOOL SECRETARY 

12-Month Position 

Typing, shorthand, and office management skills requited. Ability 

to deal with students with special needs and school staff. 

Previous experience in school or agency serving children 

preferred. 

Send resume and letter of application to: 

Jerry Pltz 

Allendale School 

P.O. Box 277, Lake Villa, ll., 60046 

(312) 356-3334 

or 

Tom Baba 

(312) 395-1421, ext. 234 



•• 



CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITIES. 

•Flexible scheduling 
•Variety of shifts and locations 
•Good wages 
• Paid holidays and vacations 

Manpower Nursing offers perfect mix of your per- 
sonal and professional life. 

Wo have a variety of shifts, locations and settings for 
qualified Registered Nurses and Certified Nurses 
Aides. 

Call For An Appointment 

(312)623-6880 (312)9494100 

Gurnee Mundelein 

MANPCWERO.HEALTH CARE 

A am t km OP i mt r O dH nmrotAMt ilimcii 
equal opportunity employer m/f * ' 



LIFEGUARD 

Wonted. WSI cord imdul' 
MmntM Bay to labor Bay, 

Monday thourqri f fWov 10 30 a.m, 
to 1:30 p.m. FI«ibU hour*. Com- 
paliltn Sotory. * 

Call: 

(312)362-9130 



22A Lakeland Newspapers 






Agoncy 

LADIES 



Call for application 

(312) 2958858 

6:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 



or 



(312) 546-7249 

after 6:00 p.m. 



NIGHT 



10 p.m. to 6 a.m. 

Apply In Person 

After 3 p.m. 

Ask for Peggy 

Gurnee Holiday Inn 

6161 W.Grand Ave. 

Gurnee 



GYMNASTICS 

COACH 

Part-Time 

Available June 1st. 

Evtriina/v 

MortJor ■ Wtd-wvfcr -Jhunicff 

S.M p.m. io 830 p.m. 

(615)459-4455 

Lake Region YMCA 

7315 S. Route 31 
Crystal Lake, Illinois 



SALES 

KS0RT 4 TIME SHARE 
REPRESENTATIVES 

-Our Repf are furnished 
with 500 tours per week. 
-Our Reps gel 3 weeks 
paid vocation per year. 
-Our Reps get 6 to 12% 
commission on Ihe gross. 
•Our Rept get paid full 
commission, with low 
down payment. 
-Our Rept ore .making 
MONEY. Don't your think 
it's, about time you 
become one of Our Reps. 

MID AMERICA RESORT 
(312) 546-0190 

(Ext. 16) 
For appointment call: 

Mr. Conter 



PARA-M0RTGAGE 
PERSONNEL 

(Entry Level) 

Continued growth of 
our mortgage ac- 
tivities has created 
an immediate need 
for individuals to 
perform - functions 
related to process- 
ing, closing, quality 
control and shipping. 
These support posi- 
tions require aC' 
curacy, 
thoroughness and a 
cooperative attitude. 

We offer a com- 
petitive salary, plea- 
sant working condi- 
tions, excellent 
benefits and oppor- 
tunity for growth . In- 
terested individuals 
call personnel. (312) 
362-3500, ext. 224 

/^&l»«t7Ti<ft*)llmp 
WWuimkwMn 

354 N.Milwaukee Ave. 

libertyville. Illinois 60043 

Equal Opportunity Employer 
Non-Smoking Preferred 



Thursday May 15, 1986 



mm&tw&f j& 'i ^j- 1 



1 



;m 








Guide 






.CARE workers. We 
seeking chlldcare 
rkers lor o live-in 
dtion ot Mooseheart. a 
Idem home for children, 
|rsery through 12lh 
tide. The requirements 
couples or singles 
the age of 25 with no 
indents, high school 
loma or equivalent 
:.D. The benefits are: 
|se solary, roam and 
_rd, laundry, sick leave, 
jcek paid vocation, paid 
fe insurance and choice 
paid hospitalization 
I jns, on opportunity to 
scome a professional 
ildcaro worker through 
Joining classes, on 'the job 
Joining. Mooseheart Is 
icoted in northern Illinois 
a beautiful, wooded 
acre plus campus. 
-iicfosfcd porlies please 
/rite: Raymond Stonich, 
lireclor of Home 
Jepartment, Auditorium, 
juilding, Mooseheart, ll. 
3539 or phone. 

{312)859-2000 
cxt.320 

17-20-22 

120,000 YEARLY possible. 

'ropare al home for Post 

)f | ice Clerk-Carrier 

employment exams. Study 

■Guide available. Write: 

JFedcroled (ILN5) POB 3006 

Hottiesburg, MS 39403- 

13006 

17-20-21 



m 



rWpWiaW 



WHETHER YOU'RE looking 
for an employer or an em- 
ployee, Lakeland's Em- 
ployment Guide will make 
your search a success. 
(312)233-8161 



SHOWROOM 
CLERK 

Monday - Friday 
Some Saturdays 

Call Nolan 

(815)455-0320 



BUSINESS OF 
YOUR OWN? 

Want To D»*»lop« A full w Pari 
rim* Loicol Oitlnbufoririip? W» 
atm a ' nationally od«»rt>ttd 
guaranteed product with an 
unlimited maikcl. No Ironchil* 
(••i. Compute training. 

l-800-4health 



BARTENDER 

For Clean 

Neighborhood Pub 

Ask For Susan 

(312)546-1100 



SALES PERSON 

Full or porl-time. 

> i .. ii' help mi* i i<«i cite ol slinh 

Growor* Outlet 

3ftO W. Liborty 

Waucanda, lit. 

Boforo 7 P.M. dally 

(815)568-7312 



TRAVEL AGENT 

Desire person with Agency/ 
School experience. 

(312)623-4735 



WANTED 

Chain O'Lake area, on 
ihe water. 

Mutiny Boat. Club 

(312)395-3093 



PARK 

MAINTENANCE 

POSITION 

t,p~*Kt itittH I ill bnt Kjromia 
l««Ml ijjyuwn rti.rs-1 a 

RHCIIMHIUISTIlGTrFFICE, 

1 12 Park Si.. Application 

deadline: May 23. 1986. 

(312) 526-3610 



•GRILL COOK 

•WAITRESSES 

All Shifts 

Apply In Person 

T. Sawyen 

SIS Rollins Rd. 
Round Lake, II. 



EXPERIENCED 
HAIRDRESSER 

HttOdl in {is*ing ulon Pud uu- 
tian and conlinumj education Apply 

SHEAR PERFECTION 

Ask For Tina Or Marge 

(312)546-2875 



LIVE-IN ENGLISH 
SPEAKING EXPERIENCED 

HOUSEKIIPfl/ ASSISTANT 

TO ELDERLY LADY OF 3 ADULT 
FAMILY. SALARY NEGOTIABLE 

(312)680-7006 



lo io« night and day. Apart- 
ment avatlabla il n«ed«d, 

Rod's Auto Shop 

(31 2) 724-8084 

Glonviow 



LANDSCAPING 
CONTRACTOR 

Seeks Experienced Truck 
Driver With Good Record. 
Clou C License. 

(313)566-9200 




n 




Hpp Wtflttd 



HOUSE HUNTING? Find 
just . the home you're 
looking for In Lakeland 
Newspapers' Classified. 



Market 
Oiti<le 




!« 



WORKER 

Full Time 
Responsible, reliable. 

Needed for busy landscape 
company. 

(312) 546-9173 
(312) 671 -LAWN 



TYPISTS 

$500 weekly at home I In- 
formation? Send self- 
addressed, stamped 

envelope to: 

Allied Business Systems 

P.O. 2S8L 
Vernon Hills, II., 60061 




THE EMCEE "A 

Krofesslonal show should 
ave a professional em- 
cee" 

Marcella A. Hardin 
Woukegan. III. 60085 

(312)3600115 
_ 30-TF-81 , 



BREAKFAST COOK 
* A.M. CLEANUP 

Hardwork & Low Pay 

Crazy Raj-jar s 

548 Main St. 
Antioch, II. 






Business Opportunities 



INVESTORS 

Small hi-tech corpora- 
tion, needs you, very 
high A.P.R. 

NUSTAR ROBOTICS 

(312) 398-2087 



REPAIR SERVICE 

* Small Engines 

$10,000 Gels You Inl 
' Marin* Specialty fttpaln 
•„ Excellent Terms 
J.P.L, Associates, Inc. 

(312) 640-8330 



Main Wii^rl 



WANTED 




Boys and girls to sell subscriptions 
to their local Lakeland Newspaper. 
Become a junior merchant, learn 
business, salesmanship, respon- 
sibility. Generous commission. We 
will train you. Complete details, in- 
cluding sales kit, available to ap- 
plicants. Call Bill Schroeder Sr., (312) 
223-8161, to pick your territory and 
get started. Act today. 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

"Serving Lpkeland With News, And A Whole Lot More!" 









A LAKELAND News-' 

Kaper's Classified ad can 
elp you turn unwanted 
Items into cash. To sell 
almost anything, just call 
our office qearest you. 
(312)223-8161 



OLSON, BOGOLIN & CO, 

2 So. Lake Street 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(312)223-6448 

•General Accounting Service 
•Financial and Management Service 
•Pension and Profit Sharing Plans 
•Taxes: Consultation; Planning; 
Research. and Audit 



r-^ 



^SELU%^ 



"BUSINESS MAN" Own 

your own Steel Building 
Dealership. Major 
manufacturer selecting 
dealer In available areas. 
High potential profits part- 
time or full time. 

1 -(303)759-3200 
ext.2407 

18-20-14 

LONG DISTANCE 

trucking. northAmerican 
Van Lines needs 
owner/operators! If you 
need training, we will Irain 
you. You will operate your 
own tractor. If you don't 
have one. northAmerican 
offers tractor purchose 
ptans and tease-purchase 
plons. Depending on the 
program you choose, you 
can get started for $850 to 
$2500. If you are 21 or over 
and think you may qualify, 
we'd like lo send you a 
complete information 
package. Call any 
weekday. Toll free. 
1 -(800)348-21 91 

askforDopt. 137 
18-20-16 




Have A Garage Sale! 




If you're planning a garage 
sale, there's no better time 
than NOW! There's no better 
day than today' to make your 
plans. Put those no longer us- 
ed items around your home 
to good use. Turn them into 
cash. 



Use the form below to mail your ad today! Or 
call one of our offices for information 






akeland v*lassif ied 



CALL- 



I S*nring Uk«, McHtnry tnd Kanotrvi Courrtitc ■ 



(312) 223-Biei" (312)587.8400 (3121305-8700 (312) 0l9-4«OO , 
ORA Y5.LAKE FOX LAKE ANTIOCH NORTH CHICAGO 



Thursday May 15, 1986 



Lakeland Newspapers 23 A 



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'and operator, $45 

per hour. Ornamental 

design, lot. clearing, junk 

removal. Grass cutting 

contracts now being taken. 

(312)587-2208 

(312)587-7407 

36-20-19 



CLASSIC HOMt Hammond 
organ. -Full-slxe. Two 
manuals, bar settings. Will 
consider any reasonable 
offer. Original model. 
• (312)587-5370 , 
52-TF-57 




SENIOR CITIZENS. Do you 

need help filing your 
Medicare and or Co- 
insurance. I have 17 years 
experience. Call meat: 
(312)587-6843 
r-3520- 1 1 2 



local or < 
JOB RESUME. S9.00 

and up. W* do il oil Eapart 
writing, typing and priming. 

AMBBCAM BSUMf SOVKE 

2835 ■alvkfare at Gr—n Boy 

Suil.300 
Woufccgan, IL 

(312) 662-13S1 



D&D 

ROTOTILLING 

Professional Work With 
Quality Equipment. 

(312) 223-4819 





asm asms uMii 
DEB BDQO arautK 
QHUOaB E3H!fl as 
OQia HBffl BSH 

ESB SEE EDE 



HUD BQB S1HBE 

db raaa avja 
a sob HBEGLUa 

EltiHES rilODB QB&] 

she runuja naa 



•Biwdi-vMrncil 



■ram ■ umi ranBg 

WrMtJEfllMBSg 

Call For 

FREE ESTIMATE 
(312) 587-5151 

Fully Insured 



i YEAR old Appalooso, 

green broke. $800. 

(312)497-3431 

after 5 p.m. 

ask for Sheila 

4721-79 . 

FIMO A JOB, or fill a job 
with Lakeland Classified. 



PttsltSeppfes 



LABRADOR PUPS 7 weeks 
old, 3 chocolate mates, 2 
chocolate females, $75 
each. 

(414)843-2867 

—51-20-70 

A LAKELAND News- 
paper's Classified ad can 
Kelp you turn unwanted 
items into cash. To sell 
almost anything, just call 
our office nearest you, 
(312)223-8161 



HOMEMADE birdhouses. 
All new pine wood, 16 and 
20 rooms, squirrel proof. 
(312)623-5700 

53-2037 

CLASSIC CAR auction, 
swap meet, antique flea 
market, antique/ 

collectible auction. April 
13th in Rockford (Now in 
May) Pecatonica, III. Expo 
(Rockford) 90 miles from 
Chicago/Milwaukee, 
Memorial weekend. May 
23-25. Box 368, Forreston, 
III.. 61030. 

* 1.(815)938-2250/2668 
— —53-20-17 




TOY SALE. Sunday, May. 
IB, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 608 
Crabtree Ct. Lindenhurst. 
55 -20- 1 r— 



OARAOfi SALE. May To- 

17. 9 a.m. -3 p.m. 26301 N. 
Lakeland Dr. Off Anderson 
Rd., Wauconda. 

—55-20-26 

MOVING SALE. 644 
Walnut Rd.. Wouconda, III. 
Larkdale Subdivision. May 
15, 16, 17.9a.m.-4p.m. 

_ 55-20-56 — — 

BLOCK SALE. Household 
items, antique glassware, 
garden plants, much 
miscellaneous. Saturday 
and Sunday, May 17 and 

18, 9 a.m. till 5 p.m. 35322 
Wilson Rd,, and Lakevlew 
Ingleside. 

55-20-60- 

OARAGE SALE Saturday 
and Sunday, May 17th and 
18th, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., 
Monday , through Thurs- 
day, May 1 9th through May 
22nd, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 
20275 W. North Avenue. 
Antioch, II. 

(312)395-8133 

55-20-1 1 1 

RENOVATION Garage 
sale. Rug, medicine chest, 
shower door, sink. etc. The 
garage Is at THE STRAW 
BARN. Hwy. 120, 
Groyslake. Friday and 
Saturday, 10-3. 

55-20- 1 1 6 — 



YARD AND bake sale. 

May 16 and 17, 10 a.m. to 
?. 45 Ernest Ave., Fox' 
Lake. III. Lakeland 
Apartments. 

55-20-20^- J 

FtND A JOB, or fill a Job 
with Lakeland Classified. 

HUGE 5 family garage 
sole. Housewares, fur- 
niture, clothes, knkk 
knocks; ceramic molds and 
paint, toys, craft items, 
much miscellaneous. 
Saturday, May 17 and 
Sunday, May 18. 9 a.m. till 
6 p.m. 327 Brown Street, 
Wauconda, III. 

_ 55-20-99 



crnei 

Spring Rummage 
Sale 

Will be held on 
Wednesday , May. 14, 
Thursday May 15, 9:00 
a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Fri- 
day May 16, 9:00 a.m. 
to Noon.' 510 Grand 
Ave., Waukegan, II., 
Everyone is welcome. 
Refreshments 
available. 



COUNCIL THRIFT SHOP 
WAREHOUSE SALE 

One Day Only 

. Sunday, May 18 -8 A.M. -3 P;M; 

FANTASTIC CLOTHING BARGAINS 

Best prices evert New and gently used spr- 
ing and summer fashion for the whole 
family. Time to stock up. Cash only. 
Free parking at Toys-R-Us 
1300 OeeHIeld Rood: Highland Pork, II 

Take Edens expwy.-Rt. 41 -exit West at 
Deerf ield Road 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

ervice 
potlight 

Put Your Business In The 
Lakeland Spotlight. Call 

(312)223-8161 




mi SCOTCH 6VAB0 WITH THl 




if* win ms/kP 



OVU 1 4.000 HOMtS CLEANED THE 
VIMA VAC MflHOO CCMUtNtS 
IMf MSI Of SHAMPOO t S1CAMI 

TRUCK MOUNTED 



ANY SIZE 

LIVING 

ROOM 

* HALL 



any size 

LIVINO 
ROOM 

DINING 
ROOM 

* HALL 

Oml, ■§ W 



ANY SOFA 



$3500 

ANY CHAIR 

$ I5°° 



CALL (312) 244-9386 



' T0TTEN BUILDERS % 

MODULAR HOMES 

Also With 
REMAX REALTY 

Antioch, Illinois 
New Homes 



P.O. Box 6 

Trevor, Wis. 

53179 



Real Estate 
'.Vis. or III. 



Ask for Ed Totten 

Home (414) 862-2315 
(312)395-7900 



'THE EXTRA CLOSET" 



ANTIOCH'S SELF SERVICE & 
STORAGE PLACE 

Corner of Malta A Depot St, 

U-LOCK-IT 



INDOOR OUTDOOR STORAGE 



SECURITY FENCED & LIGHTED 
RESERVE SPACE NOW! 

For More Information 



(312) 395-7100 • (312) 395-3577 



Welcome to the 

LAKE SHANGRkA RESTAURANT 

Polish - German - American Food 

Serving: Weekdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Sat. & Sun. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

•Roast Duck, Goulash & Spaetzel 
•Polish Sausage & Sauerkraut 
•Stuffed Cabbage (Galompkl) 
•Assorted Pierogl, Nalesnlki 
•Home Made Soups & Czarina 
•Every Sunday - Champagne Breakfast 

Hwy. V(1 BlockS. a i 16th SL Bristol, Wt) 

(414) 862-2979 



NORMS HOME 
MAINTENANCE 

No Job Too Small. I'll Do It AIL 
•■(•modeling 

Kllchmn*. Bathroom* 
& time Room* 

•Painting And 
Wallpa paring 
•Flooring 

(all typm*) 

•Siding And Roofing 
•Carpontry 

Dock* A Addition* 

All Work Vary Wmll Donm 

FREE ESTIMATES, CALL 

(414)537-2430 



MAJOR HILL 

INSURANCE AGENCY. INC. 

"INSURE WITH CONFIDENCE" 

Your independent insurance agent. 
Every account is important to us. 

Large or small. 

Personal or Commercial. 

Business Hours Monday- Friday 8:30 AJA. to 5:00 P .M . 
Saturday 8:30 AM. 1o 3:00 P.M. 

Major Hill Insurance Agency 

5 W. Meade Court. ' 
Fox Lake, II., 60020 

(312) 587-7712 



This Weeks 



Business Spotlight 



Call Pioneer 
Blacktop For 
Quality Work 



yr 




arton 



*3« 






tStikm 



£3fcJ 









<£9£i£ 



1 Pioneer BlackLop, Inc., Grayslake, 
specializes in paving of residential and com- 
mercial parking lots, sealcoating or residen- 
tial and commercial properties, and pat- 
ching and resurfacing of drives and parking 
lots. 



Ronald Freeman is owner or the business 
which was established in 1970. 

Contact Freeman at Rt. 1 Box 21 D, 
Grayslake G0030, or call (312) 546-5600. 
Business hours arc 8 a.m. to 4 :30 p.m. 



Blacktop Paving Inc. 
Of Grayslake & Libertyville 

Local 

And 

Reliable 

Established 1954 



COMM 

53 


ICIAL* 


ifSIDENTUL 


fhuk**m 


^Sw^^^^^r > j 




H -p pn**"*" 







•Driveways •Seal Coat 
•Parking Lots •Resurfacing 

Seal Coat Specialists 

Cool Tor Emulsion 
Seal Coating 

For Commercial 4 
Residential Blacktop 



coMBtaciiL- MiiDtarm 



L<g^s&. 




PROMPT 
COURTEOUS SERVICE 

DEAL DIRECT WITH OWNER 
AND SAVE ON QUALITY WORK 

Call Now Far 
Free Estimate 

-Grayslake- 

(312)223-5634 

-Libertyvllle- 

(312)367-0676 



24A Lakeland Newipapen 



Thursday May 15.1 986 



t '-*t l!i e 'iS>$A 




WING SAUS. Sunday, 

iy IB through Friday. 

ly 23, 9 a.m. fo 5 p.m. 

feplace-freestanding, 

bck matte finish, wood 

itng gas or- electric 

E?r used, carpet-12x3B, 

id color plush, brand 

» w , never unrolled, 

tchen Hooring-l2xl7. 

lite with gray pattern. 

rand new, never 

uolled; washer and 

ryor, window (roll up) 

|mds-(2) pecan 48x72 and 

}) while (1 is 48x72 and 1 

36x72 couch, recliner 

lair, kitchen labia and 4 

Notching chairs, lawn 

tower, weed eater, 

Icnilh 25" console color tv, 

jcds on /off switch; tv 

itcnna, rotor, and 

Implifier, 2 Sears trash 

Ions with lids, plastic. 10 

tear worranty, less than I 

(ear old: water soflner. 

(oflec table and end table; 

lfant dressing table- 

iople, almost new (from 

Marshall Field); motchfng 

-shelf maple wall shelf 

unit (goes above dressing 

}able) also -almost new; 

jackyard swing set, 

electric typewriter: etc., 

Icic. (608 C rob tree Court 

llindenhurst. 

.55,20-8 



GARAGE SALE 

Multi-family 

Way 17 and 18 

10 00 p.m. to V 00 p.m. 

frtrrrtHftf bom A (a 2 lane*, lur- 

.uTj'r tooi -w*. H*T-*'rf rV. »*c. 

4SS Devonshire 
Park City, II. 

*rW*X lc'ra«upl| litann) 



3 RD ANNUAL 
ALL WILDWOOD 

COMMUNITY 
GARAGE SALES 

Fri., May 16 
Sat., May 17 

9'eKm. - 4 p.m. 

(No Early Birds) 

Go street by street to 
find bargains galore. 
Look (or the green 
balloons all over 

Wild wood! 

SpontorvdByH.O.W. 



ESTATE SALE 

Everything Mult Go!! 

Large assortment of 
miscellaneous tools, 
household furniture, 
kitchen essentials. 

You Nam* It We Got If 

Soturday, May 17 
Sunday, May 18 

8:00 a.m. To 5:00 p.m. 

21399 W. Mourine Dr. 
Lake Villa 

Take Rt. 83 to Engle, 
Engte to Edwards, left on 
Edwards, left corner ol 
Edwards A Mourine Or. 



(312 546-3164 

or 

(312) 537-5549 




MARKETPLACf for smart 
shoppers, that's Lakeland 
Classified. 



13th 

"AWLINWCKKW)" 

Now on May 23-25 

Swapmeet/ 

Fleomeirfcet/ 

Craftfair 

3 Day 

Classic Car Auction 

Sunday 
Antique Auction 

Car Corral 
Sunday Car Show 

Pecatonica Expo by Rockfwd 

fO iiiiei tium.Clncago,' 

Milwaukee 

AiBloi36t 

Forresfon, II, 61030 

(" 5} f 31-2350 2U-«H 

• III rows uKfJT 



PHOTOS KM all oc- 
casions. Weddings, an- 
niversaries, parties, 
portraits. ' Professional 
photos at affordable 
prices. 

(312)356-2230 
Bruce C. Cairy 

57-26-6 

EXTRA LARGE dogVcage. 
Like new, used 1 month 
only. $55, 

(312)244-3966 

57-20-3 ■— 

HALF PRICE!! Large 
flashing arrow signs $299! 
Lighted, non-arrow $279! 
Non lighted $2291 Free 
letters! Worranty. Only 
few left this price, see 
locally. Factory; 

t -(800)423-01 63 
anytime 

57-20-19- 

D YN AM ARK RIDING lawn 
tractor. B h.p., with 
electric start, runs great. 
S475 or best offer. 

(312)587-1938 

—57-20-29 

LOTS Of kitchen cabinets 
from shows and discon- 
tinued. Reasonable 
counter tops, oak vanities 
and marble tops loo. 
Roasonoble kitchen and 
baths. 35 East Grand, Fox 
Lake. 

{312)587-1330 

57-2038 

CUB SCOUT shirl, long 
sleeve, size 8, belt, yellow 
scarf and tie clasp. Boy 
scout shirt, long sleeve, 
site 12. belt, tie clasp, 
scarf and beret, $10 each 
set. 

(312)356-8962 

157-20-9— 

TWO MATCHING Kohler 
vanily sinks.' Distinctive 
red. $90 each. $150 pair. If 
purchased as pair, will 
include while vanily with 
.black slate finish Formica 
top. 

(312)587-5370 

57-TF56 

ALWAYS A good volue for 
your family- o subscription 
to ' your local Lakeland 
Newspaper. $1 1 .50 per 
year. Call today to start 
delivery. 

(312)223-8161 

57-TF-ll 

Iftl CHEVY Caprice, 
loaded, $3350. 1981 Oatsun 
wagon, air. $1850. 6000 
BTU air conditioner, $150. 
Slingerland drum with 
cose, $75. Polyethylen 
lank 3 ft x 3 ft.. $100. No 
reasonable offer refused 
on any. 

(312)546-1790 
after 4 p.m. 

57-2072 



OUTDOOR SPOtTSMAN 

Large indoor shooting 
range and the best prices 
in Northern Illinois. Bring 
in this ad lor '/> off. 

1015 Bolvidoro Rd. 
Waukegan, II. 

(312) 623-2553 



HALF PRICE! 

Flmhing attow »ignt, S2V91 
Lighted; non -arrow. S279I 
Nonlfghted. $3391 Free let- 
tent Very lew left. See 
locally: 

1-100*423-0163 



anytime 



All stereo hi-li record 
players, cameras, copy 
mochines. calculators, ad- 
ding mochlnes-'/i off. Two 
weeks only. 
Council Thrift Shop 

41 Hlfttwacxl Avenue 
M l|tw o o 4, II 

(3121433-6560 



YOUR TICKET 
■ TO OVER 

300,000 
CfflCULATIONI 





V. 



flMOU PKHL awby bed 
with mattress. 

(312)526-6857 

^-59-20-1 1- 

LAKGI SQUARE coffee 

table, walnut/glass top 
and brass trim. For further 
details call. 

(312)223-5841 

59-20-53- 

HIGH 4 poster bed. Honey 
maple. ^Excellent, con- 
dition. Sp'rlng included. 
(312)587-4497 

59-20-59 

GREEN SOFA bed $75; 2 
day beds black and white; 
$40 each, lined green satin 
drapes 110 Inches wide by 
96'mces in length $25. 
(312)587-6401 

or 
(312)351-6377 

59-20-1 14 

STEEL DESK for sale, good 
condition, $100 or best 
offer. 

(312)662-0631 
59-20-97 



WifRtdToBuy 

WANTED TO buy slot 
machines, any condition or 
parts, also old Wurlitzer' 
juke boxes and 
nickelodeons. Paying cash. 
(312)985-2742 

60-2 1 - 1 

TIMBER FOR sole? We buy 
all species of standing 
timber and logs. Quality 
oak wonted for sawtimber, 
veneer. Contact: Randy 
Ellmaker. Sinnissippi 

Forest, Oregon, Illinois. 
1-(B15)732-6168 

or 
1 -(81 5)626-5665 

60-20-24 

CORVETTES WANTED. 
Any year or condition. 
Also antique, special 
interest cars and very low 
mileage cars. 

(414)248-3796 

-60-20-37 




refeOftw* 



1 



CARD READINGS . and 

horoscopes. 

(312)438-3472 

62-24-9 

SAVE YOURSELF money 
and newsstand in- 
convenience by sub- 
scribing to your local 
Lakeland Newspaper. Use 
order form elsowhere this 
poper or call. 

(312)223-8161 

62-TF-10-— 




I SHARON Hoffman am 
not responsible for any 
debts incurred by Robert L- 
Hoffman as of April 28, 
1986. 
63-20-1 10 



PSYCHIC FAIR: 

S* S.« M> IMItlOAM.9Mi.ni4r 

BtSI fftSKH Owl* C.b. RL 5J i R1. 
it. PdMim. 70 Ml Mo«4 rwha. Sim- 

«r ltt« HUGHf t L«cJ««. fmUt Coo- 
uHHal Fxtluc fcwMK (Willi Ihn M 
Ism H Oil Ofl 1 ContkttHiOi)) 



(312)885-1177 




-n '! Inch •4 



louRii Hk« I 

nuiMnUcnflon? Gu- 
ess •■■In. It's I 
talk for 
column by 1- I 
Inch «ftV Too mmII 
to bo offoctlwoT I; 
Yow'ro rooalne this 

-i_ J 



SINGING GROUP* seeking 
keyboard player or 
organist. 
- -(312) '360-01 15 

after 5 p.m. daily 
— 64-TF-23— — -h 



(mmmmmm 



-ibit- 



1 



LOST 9 weeks old female 

Doberman , Pinscher. 

Wearing red' collar. 

tngleside area. Reward. 
(312)587-7292 
(312)587-4913 ' 
65-20-1 15- 



1?tl ST ARCR APT Con- 
version van. Low miles, 
excellent condition, air, 
cruise, tilt, intermittent 
wipers, power windows 
and door., locks, "AM/FM 
stereo with cassette. 
tinted glass, seats 10 or 
makes into a queen size 
bed. $1 1 ,500 or best offer. 
(312)223-5424 
75-20-12 . 





FOUND YOUNG friendly 

grey cot by Perry Drugs in 
Libertyville. 

(312)494-5322 

■ ■*">,'•'.,- f -- ■■■• .J, .• - •• '. '. >. W ■ , ,.- ■. '■-.. 

ImM BorS mwatBttiWrnL 

16FT. ALUMACRAFT tri- 
huil, open bow and trailer. 
No engine. $925. 

(312)526-6393 

73-20^84 ' 

25FT. DAYSAILOR. 5 sails, 
irailor, good condition. 
$1950. 

(312)223-8985 

73-20-105 

MOVING OUT of state. 
Must sell! Fiberglass 16ft. 
Larson with trailer , 70 h.p. 
Merc. New carpeting, 2 
year old paint, job. First 
$650 takes all, 

(312)546-7338 
Scott 

73-20-6 

HARD TOP for Float Boat 
24 It. pontoon. Complete 
camping enclosure. $450, 
(312)671-7021 

73-21-42 

14FT. Fiberglass, runabout 
boat wiih trailer, 50 h.p. 
Mercury motor, $1600, 
convertible top, 
* (312)546-1555 

: 73-20-44 

16FT. CAT., like new main 
and jib, with trailer, 
$1,500. 

(312)453-3860 

73-20-67 

198S 1ft FT. 6 inches, silver 
and blue speckled Procraft 
Bass boat, 120 h.p. John- 
son, tilt and trim, Johnson 
trolling motor, 2 Sonar 
flashers, temp gaujifd, 
trailer, boat cover, still un- 
der warranty, used less 
than 20 hours, mint con- 
dition. $10,800. 

(312)526-7727 

leave message - 

-73-20-24 



JET BOAT 
SPECIALISTS 

Sim Oitt. tiwbn. Iirfcr kis CHC Cobi 
IhrtOvfct Com;k;< Wntti Otct 

(312) 546-4440 

or toll free 
1-600-892-6244 

RtB. 134 a\ Nipptrtlnk Rd. 
Round Loka 



1 



Rocf ttwtvJ VtWcteSy 

^;-v ;: AC^:^-:..::^>,Vv.:J 

1SFT, SLIDE.IN truck, 
camper. Sleeps 4, stove, 
sink and bathroom. First 
$500 takes It. 

(312)587-5151 

74-21-113 

1979 COACHMAN Mini 
homo. 22ft., excellent 
condition, new muffler 
system, radial tires. 2 new 
batteries, sleeps 6. 
$12,900, 

(414)843-3690 

alter 4 p.m. 

74-21-35 





33 Y<&£nirs 
May 16.198S 

Ei-ma & Ed 




1982 KAWASAKI. 

GPZ750, low miles, mint 
condition, hot summer 
bike, $1695. Must sell. 
attending Police Academy, 
no time to ride. 

(312)244-3429 

__ 76-20-31 

1913 HONDA V65 Magna, 
Good condition, many 
extras, $2200or best offer. 

(312)223-1893 

after6p.m, 

76-20-76 

19M HONDA Shadow, 
excellent condition, 1400 
miles, SI, 800. 

(312)680-8229 

76-20-82 

CAR ABEL A MX 125 dirt 
bike,, must sell, $450. 
miscellaneous spare dirt 
bike parts. 

(312)662-5180 
after6p.m. 
76-20.86 



1974 CHEVY Malibu, 2 
door, V6, 350 engine, runs 
real good, asking $950 or 
best offer. 

(312)526-2080 
after 6:30 p.m. 

— 83^20-83 Si- 

197ft PONTIAC Grand 
Prix, good running con- 
dition, $800 or best offer. 
(312)244-2152 
alter 5 p.m. 

83-20-81 

1971 BMW 3201. Very good 
condition, new tires, new 
brakes, garage kept, 
$5900 or best offer. 
(312)724-9394 
83-21-108 



%ficfalTri»ef$ 



WA 



1 



197$ CHEVY Bloier, ; 4 
wheel drive, complete 
with plow, new tires, 
springs, U-joints. rebuilt 
transmission, dual bat- 
teries. $2500. 

(312)546-1555 

77-20-4 5 

1976 V« TON, 4 wheel 
drive pickup, complete 
with plow, ladder racks, 
tool boxes, many other 
extras. No rust. Must see 
to appreciate! Sharp 
looker. $4500, 

(312)546-1555 

77-20-46 

MUST SELL, 1973 Ford V* 
ton, 4 speed, air con- 
ditioning, custom bucket 
seats, in dash CB, AM/FM 
cassette, ■ sunroof, white 
spoke wheels, deflector 
shield, plus much more, no 
rust, excellent condition, 
looks sharp. $2,500 or best 
offer. 

(312)362-6149 
77-20-80 




BUYING MOBILE homes 
for cash. Motor homes and 
'campers, 12s, 14s and 
double wide. 

1.(309)452-0646 

79-20-23 

1974 STERLING mobile 
home. 14x70, 2 bedroom, 1 
large balh, new carpeting 
and tile, 3 ton central air 
conditioning, includes 
stove, refrigerator, 
washer/dryer, 10x14 shed 
with electricity and gas 
heat, enclosed patio with 6 
ft. fence. Excellent con- 
dition. Must see to ap- 
preciate. $14,000 or best 
offer; 

(312)546-3945 
after 5 p.m. 

— : 79-20-4B ' 





REBUILT STARTERS and 

alternators for foreign 
cars. 

(312)587-2909 

or 
(312)546-7142 
jjgl^^MS—— 

i - M'ptff RjjflS 

;;■:■'■: 

1973 VOLVO import car, 
gOod work car, only $750. 
(312)689-9050 

— 83-20-1 17 

1969 GTO, V8 350, high 
performance, 4 speed, 
clean, asking $2,300, can 
negotiate. Must soil, 
moving. ' 

(312)546-7873 

83-20-94 

1985 CADIUAC SevUIn 
luadHd '?, .ony ..u:..or>. 
M ri • '/i 'h , DO- ".c\'< 

■wUVUIIUI ,UUi, I8,u0u 

miles, mint condition, 
asking $23,900 (40 minutes 
north of the Illinois bor- 
der). 

(414)662-5327 
83-20-95 



19M FIAT Spider 2000 
Convertible, fuel Injected," 
new exhaust and con- 
vertible top. Ready for 
summer use $3,750 or best 
offer. 

(312)367-4719 

after 6 p.m. weekdays 
anytime weekends 

83-20-85 

1985 ALLIANCE Renault. 
28,000 miles, like new, 
blue, air conditioning, AM 
radio, rear window 
defogger. 57,795. 

(312)546-6656 

-83-20-107 

FIND A JOB. or fill a job 
with Lakeland Classified. 



Advertise at Spring Bargain Mes. 



4 



jrtS 



DEALS ON W/i$ 







Advorllxe 



EwrylhlnB From Mcy c U i To Trwtki For At Llttl* At SI ,9S Par Wnfc 



ATTENTION! 1983 AMC 
Alliance, clean $2700 or 
best offer. 

(312)623-5480 

99-22-87 

1982 BUICK LeSabre, good 
condition, good tires, good 
brakes, white, tan vinyl 
top, air conditioning, 
AM/FM stereo, $3500. 
(312)356-9259 

99-22-75 

191$ CHEVY X-11, power 
steering, power brakes, 
cruise, stereo, delay 
wipers, while, take over 
payments. 

(312)546-3258 

99-22-77 



1982 CADILLAC, Eldorado, 
white, burgundy interior, 
must see, $8200. 

(312)740-0996 
after 6p.m. 

99-22-73 

1982 MACGREGOR 
sailboat, 25ft. (3) sails, 
electric start outboord 
motor, trailer, all 
equipment, S7500. 
(312)546-1324 

99-22-91 

1981 SUZUKI, 450, good 

condition, low miles. 
(312)746-3152 
after 5 p.m. 
99-22-98 



1979 KAWASAKI SR650, 
excellent condition, low 
miles, with windshield, 
AM/FM cassette player, 
trunk and backrest. Asking 
SI 000. 

(312)546-3854 

99-22- 1 09 

1977 16FT. fiberglass boat, 
Checkmate 70 h.p. out- 
board, includes boat 
trailer and canvas, asking 
price $5000. 

(312)395-5061 ' 
99-21-107 



- f 

1981 MUSTANG, 4 

cylinder, brown, 

automatic, air, power 
brakes, T-top. AM/FM 
radio, cassette, $2800. 
(312)662-0565 

days 

(312)662-5520 

evenings 

99-22-33 

1978 BUICK Skyhawk, 

looks good/runs good, low 

miles. S 1 500 or best offer. 

(312)6237101 

99-22-30 

1972 APACHE camper, 
hard top, solid sides, 
sleeps 8, new canvas, 
heater, electric brakes. 3 
burner stove, icebox. Best 
offer. 

(312)223-2549 

99-22-32 

1980 PONTIAC LeMans, 6 
cylinder, 2 door, good 
condition, 87,600 miles. 
$2500. 

(312)587-5749 
(312)537-8514 

99-32-39 

1984 PLYMOUTH. Voyager 
IE, Loaded. Still under 
warranty. SI 0,500. 
(312)336-2509 

■ — 99-20-27 

1983 FORD Escort, 2 door, 
4 speed, 48,000 miles, tan 
over brown, 38 mpg. Ex- 
cellent condition inside 
and out. Asking $3700. 
(312)587-4971 
ofter4 p.m. . 
-99-21-109 



19B0 HARLEY Davidson, 
wide glide, 5,200 miles, 
factory flame, all original, 
excellent condition, 
$4,700. 

(312)5B7-8680 
99-21-100 

FIND A JOB, or fill a job 




' 'with Lakeland Classified. 

NEXT WEEK'S*^ 



Miiifiip) 



BY SALOME 

Ariel (Mar. 21-Apr. 19) A crossroads lies ahead. 
Whichever way you choose to go, the important thing 
is to get moving. Delay gains _you nothing. New ex- 
periences await in cither direction. 

Tsarina ((Apr. 20-May 20) Expect a personal matter to 
take up much of your time. Wind up important business 
and social situations to leave yourself free to handle new- 
ly pressing demands. 

Gemini (May 21-June 20) A romantic suggestion 
should light up the darker comers of your life at this 
time. Resist the temptation to play guessing games. 
Show your suitor how you really feel. 

Ciirer (June 21 -Jul. 20) Careful That tendency to look 
for problems is threatening your current peace of mind. 
Remember the old adage: if it's not broken, don't fix it. 

Leo (Jul. 21-Aug. 22) Curiosity is good for you big, 
beautiful cats who will need to scratch beneath the sur- 
face of a new friend's cover story before making any 
social or business commitment. 

Virgo (Aug. 22-Scpt. 22) Carrying a grudge is a burden 
that can wear down an important friendship. Seek a 
reconciliation while you still have time to save the 
relationship. 

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Tidy up loose ends while the 
pressure has eased. Getting minor matters out of the 
way now allows you to spend more time on major pro- 
jects later. 

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Take more time to look oyer 
the possibilities at hand or risk overlooking something 
that might have proven important to your future. 

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) A misunderstanding is 
possible, but avoidable.- Use diplomacy in handling the 
situation. Provoking arguments can lead to new 
problems. 

Capricorn (Dec, 22-Jan. 19) Closing the bam door 
after the horse has fled isn't the way to keep a relation- 
ship stably Start solving -vor.r mutun! problems now 
berbn £«■ iuu-. 

Aquui-iu* ijaii] 20-Fcb. Ifel ReluLioiiahips i newl'icnder; 
loving care. It's easy, to bruise egos, and boforeyou know 
it, either she goes or he goes out of your life. Be careful. 

Pinees (Feb. 19-Mar. 20) Compliments are nice, but 
could be compromising. Exercise caution. Be careful you 
don't cet caught on a hook baited with flattery. 
© 1986, McNaught Synd. 



\ 



" 1 



Thursday May 15, 1996 



Lakeland Newspapers 25A 



• k-*» . * . * * % 






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"- - ; ji<; 



...4- — 



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1.4 

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<%$ 



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. 



You can advertise in the Lakeland 
Newspapers on a 3 week minimum for 
$5.85 for 12 words or less & 15V each ad-, 
ditional word. 






'ertise at Spring Bargain Rah 

^OEALS ON WA/^ 



Call One Of Our Offices 
For More Information. 

(312) UMIM (312) JfMTM 
(312) MT44M (312) 2234111 



Advertise 



Everything From Kiddie Kars To Mobile Homes For As Little As $1.95 Per Week - 



■ 



1*79 HONDA Civic, 4 
speed, good condition, 
$1200. 

(312)526-1173 

99-20-47 

1«M FIAT Stroda, 5 speed, 
AM/FM stereo, 30 mpg, 
$1250 or best offer. 
(312)356-1499 

99-20-24 



1977 THUNDIHIRD with 
every option available. 



BICYCLE BILT for 2. 

Monark Tandem bike. $60. 
(312)541-0675 
(312)680-3370 

99-22-5 

Itll YAMAHA 400. 2 
cylinder, 6 speed, new 
battery, 4,800 original 
miles, very clean. $695. 
(312)623-5334 
99-22 -36 



Excellent 
and out 
offer. 



condition inside 
$1800 or best 



(312)395-6763 

after 5 p.m. 

weekdays 

-99-20-76- 



19t4 CAMAtO. light blue 
with blue interior, V8. 
much more. Best offer. 

(312)395-5058 

(312)395-4598 

99-21-94 

1975 MERCEDES 450 SE, 
like new condition inside 
and out, all options, 
sunroof, cruise control, air 
conditioning, Becker 
AM/FM radio. etc. 
Burgundy. Asking $7500. 
Will talk.. 

(312)792-3737 

9a.m. -4 p.m. 

(312)223-2843 

5 p.m. -9 p.m. 

99-22-54 

SMART CAR Buyers shop 
Lakeland Classified first. 
Turn your car into cash the 
quick and easy way. 



mi CHEROKEE Chief 
AM/FM. 4 wheel drive, 
like new tires, trans- 
mission, under 68,000 
miles, $950 or best offer. 
(312)356-1499 
99-20-25 

1914 TOYOTA LWB Deluxe 
pickup truck. Long bed, 
automatic with overdrive, 
camper top with racks. 
$4,700. 

(312)369-3477 

afterS p.m. 

99-21 -93 ; 

197* CHRYSLER Cordoba. 
Air, lilt steering, AM/FM, 
velour interior clean, new 
carburetor, new tires. 
Runs goad. $1300 or best 



offer. 



(312)5460916 

or 
(312)740-9267 
— 99-22-58 



1975 CHEVY Laguna, little 
rust, $900. 

(312)546-7078 

after 5 p.m. 

99-21-108 







»&¥&< 



i\* 




lttt CHRYSLER LeBaron convertible. 
White top over red body, power win- 
dows, brakes, steering. Cruise control, 
air, AM/FM stereo. Excellent shape, 
$7000 firm. 

(312)356-5383 




If 73 CHARGER SE. Air, automatic, p.s., 
AM/FM- cassette, four speakers. Triple 
black. Interior in very good shape, body 
is excellent. This car is in very good 
shape and fun to drive. $3000 or best. 
(312)587-5370 




ITALIAN "YUGO". Showroom cond. 
1979 Fiat 128 2 Dr. Sdn., car the "YUGO" 
is based on. Colorado car/never saw a 
salted winter & shows it. Asking $1400. 
(312) 223-8899 






1919 CHEVY Cavalier, 2 
door, 4 speed, $2,700. 
(312)587-7281 
99-21-106 

1911 PONTIAC Grand 
LeMans wagon, V6. with 
air, low mileage, asking 
$3,900. 

(312)395-8112 
99-21 -l 1 

1974 FORD van. Tan, in- 
suloted and carpeted. 
$600. 

(312)356-9189 

99-21-1 

RIKES-TRIKES-Lawrt mow- 
ers. New and used. 
Repairs and parts. 
Reasonably priced. 
(312)587-2800 
99-21-18 

19*7 FIRERIRD, From 
California I- Car is clean) 
Many new parts, asking 
$2500. 

(312)367-3307 - 
Dan 
99-21-29 

MUST SELL 1982 750 
Kawasaki. 2500 miles. 

$1800 or best offer. 
(312)587-1682 
after 5 p.m. 
99-2 1 -39 



1979 

51800. 



CHEVY Mollbu. 

(312)526-6356 
-99-21-43 



19M FIAT Strada, 5 speed, 

AM/FM stereo, 30 mpg, 

$1,250 or best offer. 

(312)356-1499 

99-21-105 

1971 TRANS Am, limited 
edition*, black, T*tops, 
loaded, brand new engine, 
rims, and tires, must see to 
appreciate, $5,200. 

(312)546-0424 

before 5 p.m. 

(312)546-9585 

after 5 p.m. 

99-20-7 1 

SHARP LOOKING utility 
trailer, like new, custom 
built, all steel, car size 
wheels. Toll lights and 
hitch. Priced to sell, $750. 
(312)362-5709 
99-20-85 

ALL ALUMINUM 1980 
GMC step van, H.D., 350 
VB, 14 ft. box, $9000. 
(312)587-7116 

99-20-68 ^ 

MFT. ARGOSY by Air 
Stream, 1977 Luxury travel 
unit that sleeps 4, air 
conditioning, 10ft. 
refrigerator and all the 
goodies plus stereo. Truly 
a quality unit for the 
greatest of camping 
pleasure at only $6900. 
(312)546-0788 

99-20-66 

197t FORD LTD II. New 



1977 PONTIAC Grand Prix 

SJ. Air conditioning, cruise 
control, bucket seats with 
console and more. $1800 
or?. 

(312)526-7946 

anytime 

—99.22-49 



1973 OLDS Delta 88, 
Royale, one owner, 42,000 
miles. Garage kept. New 
tires, new battery, ex- 
cellent interior.' and ex- 
terior condition, $1,500. 
(312)395-1591 
99-22-65 



19*3 POHT1 AC Firebird. 
Charcoal black with cloth 
Interior,* 4 ';:, cylinder, 
automatic,.' -air. con- 
ditioning, AM/FM stereo, 
61,000 miles. Asking 
$5000. 

(312)546-9392 

—99-21 -115 

1971 17FT. Avco , motor 
home, runs great, good 
condition, $4,400. 

(312)587-9423 

(312)587-2577 

— 99-21-101 — 

197S CHRYSLER Magnum 2 
door, power steering, 
power- brakes, air con- 
ditioning, looks great, runs 
great, $1800 or will trade 
for smaller car of equal 
value. 

(312)546-5316 

after 6 p.m. 

-99-21-104 — 



19S3 FUEGO E series, 5 

speed, low mileage, 

excellent condition, $4500. 

(312)746-1179 

after 5 p.m. . 

99-20-70 

1977 CADILLAC Fleetwood 
Brougham, mint condition 
inside and out $3800 or 
trade for Ford pickup of 
equal value, 

(312)356-7563 
-99-20-7: 



back brakes, new 
90,000 miles, $650. 
(312)587-7429 

after 3 p.m. 

-99-20-104- 



tires, 



1971 MUSTANG Cobra. 
Clean inside and out. T- 
tops, belt 82, 302 HO. shift 
kit, plus extras. $2200 or 
best. 

(312)356-3678 
after 5:30 p.m. 
-99-20-65 



BICYCLE SPRING 
TUNE-UP $ 19 95 



•UJHit I elt» brakai 

•MM I claaa diraillitri 
•Mjatt haaliat 
•Mjatf bittom bracket 
•AJjait axli cam 




•Cliia I laba cbaia 
**•■*** -w._>* *Tnia rttali (RJiaar) 
PARTS EXTRA .uba all pivctiif Maebaaiimt 

•TitMia all ant I ktlti 

•Sifity aback 

r 1 




1421 Cedar Lake Road (312). 740-0007 Round Lake Beach, IL 




8.5% Financing - Up To 60 Months 



CHEROKEE 




CHEROKEE PIONEER 



Excellent Choice; 
Color & Options 

86 Cherokee 2 Dr. 

2 wheel drive. License, 
taxes, title included. Based 
on 60 month term $195.00 
per mo. with $1 ,000 cash 
down or trade 




86 Cherokee 2 Dr. 

4 wheel drive. License, 
taxes, title included. Based 
on 60 month term $215.00 
per mo. with $1,000 cash 
down or trade 




AMC/JEEP RENAULT 

Sheridan Rd. at the Stateline IL (312) 746- 1221 

Wl (4 14) 658 4040 
OPE N MON 1 HRU THURS. 9 TO 9; FRI 9 TO 6; SAT. 9 TO 5 



26A Lake-land N«w»pap*rs 



Thursday May 15, 4966 




& . 



s» 



.,..;-■ ■&>}* 



— ^^«^ I'^f^f? 1 '" -'. 






These Reliable Dealers 
Have The Car For You! 




'T 



Open 

9-8 

Mon.-Fri. 



l&B 



Open 
9-5 
Sat. 



MOTORS 



Pres&nts 
Bargain Bas&ment Baators 

1978 Plymouth Volare' Wgn. $7QR 

Loaded, air, smalJV-8. .■**** 

1979 Chevy CheveHe 

f 4 Or. auto., air, low miles. 

1978 Honda Civic 

Cute little 2 Dr., 4 spd, nice! 

1976 Ford (ran Torino Sport 

Auto., air, Red & ready! 

1977 Chevy Camaro Spt. Cpe. $495 

Auto., small V-8, runs great. ^ *J W 

1974 Cadillac Limousine $495 




$ 795 
$ 795 
$595 



A little rusty, but runs great. 

1974 Olds Delta 88 

,4 Dr., auto., P/S, "A Better Beater". 

1977 Chevy CheveHe 

4 Spd., runs fantastic! 

1974 Chevy Vega Wgn. 

Auto, trans., runs O.K. 

1975 V.W. Rabbit 

4 spd., runs nice! 



'395 
$ 295 
$ 195 
$ 195 



'All Cars Listed, Sold "As Is'" 

'Bargain Basement Beater Prices Are Not Negotiable * 

(311)2234141 All M«* Final (312)2234141 



1979 FIREBIRD. Automatic, 
T-tops, AM/FM cassette, 
air. Asking $4000. 

(312)356-7847 

__ — 83-19-16 

197* AMC Hornel station 
wagon automatic, AM/FM 
radio, good work car, 
$800. 

(312)360-9741 

or 

(312)623-4408 

after 6 p.m. 

83-19-38 

197* PORD Pinto wagon. 
Runs and looks aood. 4 
cylinder, 4 speed. $750. 

(312)740-0910 

83-19-61 . 

1*77 HONDA Civic whh 
air, runs very good. $300 
firm. 

(312)546-6070 

83-19-89 

7910 MERCURY Capri, 4 
cylinder, 4 speed, $500 or 
best offer. Must see to ap- 
preciate. 

(312)356-3343 
aflQrSp.m. 

83- 1 9-77 

1977 PONTIAC Sunbird, 

good condition, AM/FM 

cassette stereo, $800. 

(312)587-6875 

-83-1 9-75 — 

19IS CHRYSLER 5th Ave., 
V8, showroom new, under 
9.000 miles, Ziebart, 
$13,500 or offer. 

(815)675-6032 
after 5 p.m. 

83-19-86 

1914 BLACK Flero. 4 
speed, air sunroof, AM/FM 
cassette, power windows. 
19,000 miles, 5 year 50,000 
mile warranty. $6,800. 
(414)862-2765 
83-19-87 

1971 FORD LTD. Body bad, 
engine good. Will sell for 
parts. $200 or best offer. 
(815)675-2804 

M 19 /l \ 

T«I CHEVY pickup, runs, 
$1,000. 

(312)689-3697 
, ... B3- 19-96 



1913 CADILLAC Coupe 
DeVille, 23,000 miles, 1 
owner. 

(312)623-3062 

- 83-19-28 

1919 CHEVY Impala. 327 
engine. $325, 

(312)689-1842 ■ 
after 5 p.m. ■ 

83- 1 9-22 

1971 ELDORADO, very 
good condition, runs 
excellent, low mileage, 
loaded, with many extras., 
$2500. 

(312)367-5597 

B3- 1 9-30 

;i9H DATSUN 210, 2 door. 
5 speed, AM/FM, radio, 
low mileage. Very clean, 
runs great! $2,800 or best 
offer. 

(312)223-0890 

83-19-103 

1910 OLD5 Cutlass 
Supreme Brougham $3,800 
or best offer. 

(312)546-8195 

83-19-83 

1*74 GRANADA, 2 door, 
good condition inside and 
out. New brakes, $1 ,200. 

(312)356-6708 
after 5 p.m. 

83-1 9-42 

1979 OLDSMOBIL1 Cutlass 
wagon, power 

steering/brakes, air, 
$2200. 

(312)526-5932 

after 5:30 p.m. 

83-19-23 

1913 BUICK LeSabre 
Limited Coupe. V8, power 
steering,- power brakes, 

f tower windows, power 
ocks, power mirrors, 
power reclining seats. Tilt, 
cruise, rear window 
defroster, velour interior, 
Landau roof, wire wheels, 
AM/FM stereo cassette. 
Intermittent wipers, rust 
proofed. Low miles, mint 
condition, Must see. $8500 
or best offer. 

(312)566-8499 
offer 3 p.m. 
83-19-95 . 



1984 DODGE Omni GLH, 

(Shelby 2.2) non-turbo, air, 

low mileage, best offer. 

(312)223-2215 

evenings 

and 
weekends 

83-20-88 

1971 THUNDERBIRD, 
black, 2 door, hardtop, V8, 
automatic, power brakes, 
power steering, air, 
cruise. Negotiable. 
(312)356-2694 
83-20-89 

197t MUSTANG, V8, 4 
speed, power steering, 
power brakes, looks good, 
runs great. $1800. 

(312)546-8529 ' 

83-20-51 

1173 VW Karmann Ghia, 
many new parts, $1000/of- 
fer. 

(312)356-8326 

83-19-80 

197$ VW Bug, fuel in- 
jected, good condition, 
$1300. 

(815)385-8189 
-83-19-91- 



1914 PLYMOUTH Horizon, 
4 door hatchback, 2.2 
engine 5 speed, rear win- 
dow defroster, very clean, 
one owner $3095. Make of- 
fer. 

(312)356-3135 

after 5 p.m. 

; — _83-19-99 

19M CADILLAC Coupe 
DeVille. Loaded, under 
22,000 original miles, 1 
owner, excellent 

mechanical and interior 
condition, slight body 
damage to front bumper 
and passengers fender and 
door. Reason for selling, 
settling an estate. 

(312)367-1901 
after 5 p.m. 
; ^3-19-117 

19IS CAMARO Z28. blue 
metal flake paint, tuned 

[tori Inaction, roar hatch 
ouvars, bra and bonnet, 5 
year unlimited mtlgpge 
warranty. T-iopv- and 
-Chapman alarm system, 
13.500 miles SI 5,000. - 
(312)546-5195 . 
afler6p.m. 
99-19-74 



1984 NISSAN Stanza, 1 
owner, deluxe model, air, 
automatic, stereo 
cassette, power brakes, 
steering, windows, locks 
and sunroof, garage kept, 
low miles, absolutely mint 
condition, $6395 or best 
offer. 

(312)356-6377 

83-20-78 

1969 CAMARO mint 
condition, must see to 
appreciate, $5,500 or 
make offer. 

(312)587-6581 

83-20-93 

19tl DATSUN 280ZX, good 
condition, best offer over 
$5,000. 

(312)356-2973 

83-20-92 

1977 FORD LTD wagon, 
AM/FM stereo, cruise, air 
conditioning. 

(312)244-3057 

83-20-90 

19(1 BUICK LaSabre. V6, 4 
door, one owner. 

(312)662-3887 
after 6 p.m. 

83-20-2 

1975 HORNET, new 
alternator, starter, 
solenoid, muffler, $175. 
(414)862-6231 

83-20-69 

1975 ,4x4 International 
Scout. Needs work. Best 
offer gets it. 

(312)857-7830 

83-20-7 

1980 MAZDA RX7, 5 
speed, BRA, AM/FM radio, 
sun roof, good condition, 
must sell, $3,990. 

(312)356-2650 
—83-20-66 

CADILLACS, Mercedes, 
Porsche, etc. Direct from 
Government. Seized in 
drug raids. Available your 
area. Save SthousandsS. 
(216)453-3000 
ext. A2053 

83-21-13 

1982 CHRYSLER LaBaron. 
" f*bwer steering, power 
brakes, cruise, air con- 
ditioning, vinyl top, rear 
window defogger, ex- 
cellent condition. 

(414)843-3174 

after 6 p.m. 

—83-20-27 



Antes FwStk ;? 

- ■• '.- >■;.- '-■;,:.. ir: 

|1979T-B1RD,$1500. 

(312)356-1072 

alter 5 p.m. 

83-20-74 







ArtM For Stlt 

" '-;.">-■•. ' . ■■■:■■■■■ '*' ■'■■'; 

1974 FORD Granada, 
door. Moke an offer. 
(312)244-3329 
83-20-34 







i 



SMART CAR Buyers. shop 
Lakeland Classified first. 
Turn your car into cosh the 
quick and easy way. 






iif ford's 

Inventory Reduction Sale 

Cars 

IN STOCK 
FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

% 

/ w A. P. R. Financing 

Largest Selection 
In Northern Lake County 

|*On Selected Models 



EXPERIENCE THE CLIFFORD DIFFERENCE 

Ask Salesman For Details 







CHRYSLER 



Plymouth 



CHRYSLER 
PLYMOUTH, INC 



61 N.MAIN 325 N.MILWAUKEE 
CRYSTAL LAKE ^ LIBERTYVILLE 
815-459-9000 312-367-0800 

unw-THMRS a.9 FRI. 9-6 SAT. 9-5 




I 



(day May 15, 1986 



Lakeland Newspapers 27A 




AiVftW;-, 



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CHICAGO 



' 




Ft&sn 



H&ve Been Buying 
ockenbaeh Since 

Hsalm Wm A Mmme On 



(Backfield Coach) 
JOHNNY ROLAND 

7 like to associate with win- 
ners in Ali aspects of my life. 
That's why I get my car from 
Rockenbach Chevrolet!" 





•» . 



JB 



CHICAGO 



BRAND NEW 





(Quarterback Coach) 

GREG LANDRY 

■ 7 know I can count on the ser- 
vice department at Rocken- 
bach Chevroiet. I wouldn't 
have it any other way. " 




v. -' 



BRAND NEW ^Bt 



CHICAGO 



'v'ff^B 



1986 
CHEVETTE 










1986 
S10 PICKUP 



$ 6161 



(Defensive Coordinator) 

VINCE TOBIN 

"Being new to the area, we 
needed to find a dealer that 
was reliable and 

respected. ...and, that's why we 
chose Rockenbach 

Chevrolet!" 



CHICAGO 



~ iff " 



y&h 



am^ 



-r^Li;^ 







SELECTION HAS NEVER BEEN GREATER 
PRICES HA VE NEVER BEEN BETTER! 



(Offensive Line Coach) 

"I Strive a Rockenbach 
Chevrolet because someone 
who's been around for 60 
Years has alot going for 
them!" 



nan 




'■ — • 



UNDER $8,000 



UNDER $6,000 UNDER $2,000; 



'84 FORD BRONCO 4x4 

V-6, 4 speed, air, cruise, tilt wheel, 
am-fm stereo, sunroof. 

'84 OLDS FIRENZA 4 DR. 

Automatic, 4 cylinder, air, tinted 
glass, stereo, rear defogger. 

'84 MAZDA 626 2 DR. 

4 cylinder, 5 speed, tilt, tinted glass, 
reclining buckets. 

'82 VOLVO DL 4 DR. 

4 cylinder, 4 speed, air, tinted glass, 
radials, am-fm stereo, cloth interior, 
rear defogger, sun roof, nice car! 

'82 PONTIAC TRANS AM 
V-8, automatic, cruise, air, tilt, am- 
fm cassette, Gauge Package, cloth 
interior, rear defogger, delay wipers, 
reclining buckets, nice car! 

'84 TOYOTA COROLLA SR5 

-4 cylinder, automatic, with over- 
drive, air, tinted glass, am-fm 
stereo, gauges, tachometer, rear 
defogger, intermittent wipers, 
cruise. 



•85 S10 PICKUP 

13,000 miles, dark 
Must seel 



blue metallic. 



'83 CHEVROLET CELEBRITY 4 OR. 

4 cylinder, automatic, air, tilt wheel, 
tinted glass, heavy duty battery. 
WW tires. 



'83 FORD MUSTANG 

4 cylinder, automatic, tinted glass, 
am-fm cassette, sunroof, rear 
louvres. 



'83 CHEVY MALIBU WAGON 

4 door, V-8, automatic, air, WW 
tires, am-fm, rear defogqer. 



'80 OLDS T0R0NAD0 2 DR. 

8 cylinder, automatic, power steer- 
ing, power brakes, power door 
locks, cruise, air, tilt wheel, tinted 
glass, am-1m stereo cassette, cloth 
interior, rear defogger, moon root, 
Landau top. Loaded! 



AIMOST 
ANY 



IS WORTH 

$1500 

AT ROCKENBACH 

CHEVROLET 

We Need Tour Trade-In!! 



'83 FORD FAIRMONT 

Automatic, air, cruise, tinted glass, 
stereo. 

'83 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 

4 cylinder, automatic, tinted glass, 
WW tires, cloth buckets, rear 

defogger. 

'82 CHEVROLET CELEBRITY 4 DR. 

6 cylinder, cruise, air, tinted glass, 
cloth interior, rear defogger, inter-' 
mittent wipers. ~"* 

»82 CHEVROLET MALIBU 

CLASSIC 4 DR. 

V-8, dlesel, automatic, cruise, air, 

lilt wheel, tint glass, rear defogger. 

'81 BUICK REGAL 2 DR. 

V-6, automatic, air, tilt wheel, tinted 
glass, cloth Interior, rear defogger. 

'81 DODGE OMNI 4 DR. 

4 cylinder, 4 speed, air, am-fm 6 
track, cloth Interior, sun roof, rear 
wiper, rear defogger.' 

'81 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 2 DR. 

V-6, automatic, cruise, air, Rally 
Wheels, cassette, Landau Roof. 

'84 CHEVROLET CHEVETTE 

4 cylinder, automatic, cloth Interior, 

bucket seats. 



'81 PONTIAC GRAND LEMANS 
WAGON 

Air, tilt, stereo, spilt seat. 

V8 t air, whRewal I tires, 52,000 milt 
nice shape 1 

'81 CHEVROLET CHEVETTE 

4 cylinder, dlesel, automatic, lime 
glass, am-fm cassette, cloth U 
terior, rear defogger. 

'81 DODGE ARIES K 

4 cylinder, automatic, air, tinte 
glass, am-fm cassette, re; 
defogger. 

'80 FORD FAIRMONT 2 DR. 

V-6, automatic, air, WW tires, am-fj 

C3SS6tt£? "" 

'80 CHEVROLET CHEVETTE 4 

4 cylinder, automatic, air, tiit-whee{ 
tinted glass, cloth, Interior, rea 
defogger. 

*78 AMC CONCORD WAGON 

6 cylinder, automatic, WW tires, ar 
fm, cloth Interior. 

78 FORD LTD II 

Automatic, air, power steer 

power brakes. 

77 FORD LTD II STATION WAGOr 

8 cylinder, automatic, air.'.bencr 
seat. 



& 




' ■ xiii 



9 





•-'. '..■ ".* . ■ . - i i.r-'.iv.v-.r- 

e Lake 



i 



L 



fP#??*- (3-I2) 223-8651 





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-- 




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S1NCE1926; 



28 A Lakeland Newspaper* 



Thursday May 15, 1986